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Rot free doors ?


nige90
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As I've so far failed in the mission to find the Holy Grail of 2nd hand

Landy parts, The Rustless Doors, I decided to repair the ones I have.

Locked myself in the garage for a while and made a couple of bottom

channel sections and bob's whatever.

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I did somthing similar with mine but nowhere near as tidy!!!

I used stainless steel box section and some stainless plate to repair mine!

2mm plate for the skin to fold around. 25 / 30mm box for the base and two lengts(300mm) of 20mm box pushed up into the remainder of the door frames.

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You can buy the repair section for series doors which works very well and is the easiest way to fix series doors.

You cant buy the correct pattern for defender doors as its a different profile. However the series one is near enough and I've repaired the defender doors on my truck using the series sections. When the door trims are on its pretty much indistinguishable from the correct part!

Jon

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Freight prices to Panama are very high, so I rebuilt my SIII door/window frames out of 1mm galvanized.

Test bend , next to old frame,

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Made a new handle box on the right side.

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New parts.

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Piece for the window frame

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Repaired door.

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Very nice work 88, I take it that with the moist , warm climate in Panama unprotected steel rusts pretty quickly ?

Given how well those rust in the moist, cold climate of the UK I would've though Galv would be the material of choice wherever it was available :lol: I still fancy having a go with extruded ali though.

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Very nice work 88, I take it that with the moist , warm climate in Panama unprotected steel rusts pretty quickly ?

Mo

Thank you, and yes, with the high humidity (80-90% in the rainy season) and living a couple miles from the ocean, bare steel does not last long. Galvanized is better, and I had it on hand. Aluminum would not rust, but I am using a stick welder.

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Thank you, and yes, with the high humidity (80-90% in the rainy season) and living a couple miles from the ocean, bare steel does not last long. Galvanized is better, and I had it on hand. Aluminum would not rust, but I am using a stick welder.

how do you work with such thin sheet with the stick welder?

i use a stick welder, but find that 1.6mm sticks on 1.6mm steel is about the limit, with the power wound down as far as it will go.

can you use thinner sticks or something to prevent blowing holes? even with 1.6 you have to go pretty fast to avoid blowing holes. maybe something is wrong with my technique.

what did you use for your bulkhead? i remember reading your thread on the lruk forum a few years ago, but i cant remember much really.

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how do you work with such thin sheet with the stick welder?

i use a stick welder, but find that 1.6mm sticks on 1.6mm steel is about the limit, with the power wound down as far as it will go.

can you use thinner sticks or something to prevent blowing holes? even with 1.6 you have to go pretty fast to avoid blowing holes. maybe something is wrong with my technique.

what did you use for your bulkhead? i remember reading your thread on the lruk forum a few years ago, but i cant remember much really.

I use 3/32" rod (smallest available in Aguadulce) and 40 or 60 amps. I make some holes, have you tried different angles? When welding heavier steel I weld left to right with the rod at about 45-60º, on the thin stuff I use 20-30º almost paralled to the piece. Checked the door frame metal, it is .050"- 1.25mm, I put backing pieces inside the corners of the door frames and plug welded the flat strips to the profile piece.

The bulkhead was .062" galvanized, and it has a few extra holes.

When welding thin, I usually practice awhile on some scrap.

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