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Found series 1 LWB


twizzle
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Found another one

You obviously have a natural talent - maybe you could make money at this?

Both of them look adorable in different ways, but the old truck in the field gets my vote. Who on here wouldn't love to get that in a nice warm workshop with a nice fat bankroll and a few months sabbatical?

:) :) :)

TS

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name='TwoSheds' date='May 19 2007, 04:00 PM' post='149236']

Who on here wouldn't love to get that in a nice warm workshop with a nice fat bankroll and a few months sabbatical?

:) :) :)

TS

Me, I wouldn't, not unless you let me do the aforementioned 6x6 conversion. They are certainly aesthetically pleasing to the eye, but in standard form they were a truly horrible, cramped, rattly, unmanouverable and underpowered vehicle to drive.

Bill.

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I know what you mean Bill - a tasteful 6x6 would be nice...

I must admit that the thought of that bodywork hiding a V8, coils and discs has crossed my mind - and at one time that would have been my only thought... But I am beginning to look at these things in a different light. Perhaps it's a 'senior' thing.

I do like the 6x6 idea, but if you were to keep the rest of it fairly original then (even restored to a high standard) it would still be a "cramped, rattly, unmanouverable and underpowered vehicle to drive" (although I can't bring myself to describe it as "horrible" ;)

I guess I just have the equivalent of beer-goggles on when I look at S1's :D

TwoSheds

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Thing is, in the current times, with all the other superior, improvements in 4x4 development, the S1's like this are more of a classic curiousity, as much as a useable vehicle.

I think that the appeal has to be the aesthetics, as with any old classic car, its the heartstring pull that is the appeal.

They just make you go misty eyed.

And yes, bill, i agree that they are not great when looked at with cold facts, but hey, with one of these you just gotta kick back and accept a different pace of life.

Thats my tupence anyhow.

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I know what you mean Bill - a tasteful 6x6 would be nice...

I must admit that the thought of that bodywork hiding a V8, coils and discs has crossed my mind - and at one time that would have been my only thought... But I am beginning to look at these things in a different light. Perhaps it's a 'senior' thing.

I do like the 6x6 idea, but if you were to keep the rest of it fairly original then (even restored to a high standard) it would still be a "cramped, rattly, unmanouverable and underpowered vehicle to drive" (although I can't bring myself to describe it as "horrible" ;)

I guess I just have the equivalent of beer-goggles on when I look at S1's :D

TwoSheds

I have the same twisted sense of aesthetics as yourself TS. Even the absurd and crazy mismatched panel lines of the station wagon appeal to me. But having once covered over 1500 miles, only stopping to refuel in one of those rattletraps, I have no problem with using the ''H'' word.

Bill.

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My first ride in a Landrover was a SI ragtop when I was in the Scouts, late '50s, early '60s. It was somewhere in the Lake District, p*****g down with rain and God knows how many of us were crammed in the back. It was exciting at the time but now I'm in my own late 50s I think it's the last vehicle I'd want to drive. I borrowed one a few years ago and wasn't sorry to return it!

My own view on Classic cars (having owned quite few) is that anything over 50 years old should be kept as standard as possible, any mods being easily reversible (anyone who retains trafficators instead of fitting flashers wants sectioning).

I've extensively updated my SIII 88, but kept the original appearance, all Landrovers have an aesthetic appeal to me.

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My first ride in a Landrover was a SI ragtop when I was in the Scouts, late '50s, early '60s. It was somewhere in the Lake District, p*****g down with rain and God knows how many of us were crammed in the back. It was exciting at the time but now I'm in my own late 50s I think it's the last vehicle I'd want to drive. I borrowed one a few years ago and wasn't sorry to return it!

My own view on Classic cars (having owned quite few) is that anything over 50 years old should be kept as standard as possible, any mods being easily reversible (anyone who retains trafficators instead of fitting flashers wants sectioning).

I've extensively updated my SIII 88, but kept the original appearance, all Landrovers have an aesthetic appeal to me.

Us in the Vincent HRD world have the same attitude, all the long distance people have fitted fully sprung subframes for luggage, as well as disc brake conversions, digital ignition systems, mikuni/amal concentric mk II carburettors et cetera et cetera. However if any of the owners ever wanted to return their bikes back to standard as of 1946-55, all they'd have to do is un-bolt the bits and bolt standard items back on :)

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  • 2 weeks later...
Try Richards Chassis or Designa Chassis, both in Doncaster.
IIRC Marsland are making S1 LWB chassis.

I emailed all the above companies about 3 months ago, looking for a 107" pickup chassis, they all replied saying sorry, we dont make them. (including designa chassis)

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At £2300 plus delivery :blink:

"NOW TAKING ORDERS FOR 107" STATION WAGON CHASSIS"

The station waggon chassis is very different from the pickup chassis on series 1's, i admit it could be made to fit a pickup, but it would never be right.

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"NOW TAKING ORDERS FOR 107" STATION WAGON CHASSIS"

The station waggon chassis is very different from the pickup chassis on series 1's, i admit it could be made to fit a pickup, but it would never be right.

I've never really looked closely at a series 1 station wagon chassis, but aren't they more or less identical to series 2 chassis, in that the rails dogleg down just forward of the rear bump stops in order to provide a low foot panel for the rear seat passengers?

Bill.

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  • 1 month later...
I've never really looked closely at a series 1 station wagon chassis, but aren't they more or less identical to series 2 chassis, in that the rails dogleg down just forward of the rear bump stops in order to provide a low foot panel for the rear seat passengers?

Bill.

Yes Bill, spot on that man. Also the rear crossmember is completely different. You could make up a support structure similar to what the later series pick ups have, and cut the rear crossmember off a brand new chassis ( :blink: ) but i have 2 problems with that....

1. I would like to do a decent job of the rebuild, and it not be a botch job

2. £2300 plus delivery, just to cut it about?? The correct type pick up chassis (when they were available a while bk) were £1500 - £1800

Im jus going to bide my time i think. Ive already resigned myself to the vehicle being my retirement project (im 22!) so im in no hurry, if a chassis came up i would be interested, but till then, she will stay where she is....

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