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Rear diff pinion angle


Pete Attryde
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Afternoon all,

Whilst reading another thread on here some where I came across a suggestion of Billvansnorkel's for correcting the diff pinion angle by fitting the triangular metal plate for the rear radius arm to chassis bushes in front of the chassis mount rather than behind it. As my disco has a 2" lift the pinion to prop angle was noticeably odd (plus I was getting a vibration from the rear under some conditions) I thought I would give this a go. Half an hour with the spanners all changed around and the pinion sits at a much better angle, However the one side effect I have noticed is that the wheels now sit quite a bit closer to the front edge of the wheel arch.

With 255/65/16 AT's I have fitted at the moment this is not causing any problems however I intend in the near future to change over to a set of 235/85/16 MT's which are going to be about 75mm larger diameter and therefore put the tyre within about 15mm of the wheel arch which is going to be to close. I dont really want to have to modify the front of the rear arch to much as it's a 5 door. So feel I will have to put the radius arm bush back to it's original position and then correct the pinion angle at the a-frame.

So what is available to achieve this? Ideally I would like to use a standard type (although wide angle) ball joint but it would need to sit something like 10mm further towards the rear of the car to tip the diff nose upwards. I have seen THIS from QT but it seems expensive and use's a rosejoint which I would like to avoid as this a daily driver.

Any and all suggestions are welcome :huh:

Pete.

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Sadly, there are relatively few options I'm afraid.

The best suggestion I can offer is fabricating your own mounting for the standard ball joint.

I think you are better off trimming the wheel arches a bit.

Si

Afternoon all,

Whilst reading another thread on here some where I came across a suggestion of Billvansnorkel's for correcting the diff pinion angle by fitting the triangular metal plate for the rear radius arm to chassis bushes in front of the chassis mount rather than behind it. As my disco has a 2" lift the pinion to prop angle was noticeably odd (plus I was getting a vibration from the rear under some conditions) I thought I would give this a go. Half an hour with the spanners all changed around and the pinion sits at a much better angle, However the one side effect I have noticed is that the wheels now sit quite a bit closer to the front edge of the wheel arch.

With 255/65/16 AT's I have fitted at the moment this is not causing any problems however I intend in the near future to change over to a set of 235/85/16 MT's which are going to be about 75mm larger diameter and therefore put the tyre within about 15mm of the wheel arch which is going to be to close. I dont really want to have to modify the front of the rear arch to much as it's a 5 door. So feel I will have to put the radius arm bush back to it's original position and then correct the pinion angle at the a-frame.

So what is available to achieve this? Ideally I would like to use a standard type (although wide angle) ball joint but it would need to sit something like 10mm further towards the rear of the car to tip the diff nose upwards. I have seen THIS from QT but it seems expensive and use's a rosejoint which I would like to avoid as this a daily driver.

Any and all suggestions are welcome :huh:

Pete.

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Sadly, there are relatively few options I'm afraid.

The best suggestion I can offer is fabricating your own mounting for the standard ball joint.

I think you are better off trimming the wheel arches a bit.

Si

Afternoon all,

Whilst reading another thread on here some where I came across a suggestion of Billvansnorkel's for correcting the diff pinion angle by fitting the triangular metal plate for the rear radius arm to chassis bushes in front of the chassis mount rather than behind it. As my disco has a 2" lift the pinion to prop angle was noticeably odd (plus I was getting a vibration from the rear under some conditions) I thought I would give this a go. Half an hour with the spanners all changed around and the pinion sits at a much better angle, However the one side effect I have noticed is that the wheels now sit quite a bit closer to the front edge of the wheel arch.

With 255/65/16 AT's I have fitted at the moment this is not causing any problems however I intend in the near future to change over to a set of 235/85/16 MT's which are going to be about 75mm larger diameter and therefore put the tyre within about 15mm of the wheel arch which is going to be to close. I dont really want to have to modify the front of the rear arch to much as it's a 5 door. So feel I will have to put the radius arm bush back to it's original position and then correct the pinion angle at the a-frame.

So what is available to achieve this? Ideally I would like to use a standard type (although wide angle) ball joint but it would need to sit something like 10mm further towards the rear of the car to tip the diff nose upwards. I have seen THIS from QT but it seems expensive and use's a rosejoint which I would like to avoid as this a daily driver.

Any and all suggestions are welcome :huh:

Pete.

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Cheers Simon,

I had a feeling that was going to be the case and I don't have the facilities to make a mount of my own.

Pete.

editted to ad the following,

Does anyone have a spare balljoint mount that I could have to use a I may be able to get one made for me and having one as a pattern would aid the process.

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