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RR P38 EAS valve


Les Henson
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This thread is the replacement of the EAS main valve on a Range Rover P38 4.0ES.

Syptoms are the vehicle settling on it's bump stops overnight, the pump continuously running with no effect on the ride height or if the valve leak is slight - then intermittant suspension control.

The air pressure in the system is considerable, so great care should be taken when both venting the entire system, and working on the pipework associated with it. However, the work itself is straight forward and relatively easy - no special tools are required - 8, 11, 12, 24mm spanners, pliers, 4mm allen key, some spit, a fine screwdriver, and a wide blade screwdriver are all that's required.

Park the vehicle on a level surface, lower the suspension, apply the handbrake, jack up the drivers side of the vehicle and support on axle stands. On this model the reciever is on the drivers side underneath - level with the passenger seat.

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The reciever has a vent/drain plug. You must release the remaining air pressure in it in a controlled way. The plug is 24mm. Carefully undo the plug until you hear air hissing out through the slack thread. Once this happens - leave the tank to leak away until the plug feels loose in it's thread and there is no more air escaping.

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The plug has a rubber O-ring to help seal it. You must remove the plug entirely once it's safe to do so in order to inspect the O-ring for damage. If it looks ok, then apply a small amount of grease to it and then put it back in.

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Once the plug is re-fitted, lower the vehicle back down and open the bonnet. The EAS system is contained within it's own housing - in this case the passenger side inner wing.

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Remove the cover and the pump, solenoids, and valve block are inside.

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Pump out first - squeeze the plug connector so that it comes off inside the housing, then unplug the pump.

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The pump is held in place by 3 x m8 nyloc nuts and washers -two towards the front, and one at the rear.

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The pump will lift up a small amount and will then allow access to the oulet pipe. The male thread is 11mm, and the outer pipe nut is 12mm. Hold the male fitting still and undo the pipe nut.

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The pump can now be lifted clear of the housing.

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The valve block/solenoid assembly is now clearly visible - try not to damage it, new ones are £700! :o .

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The whole assembly comes out as a single unit as follws:-

Unplug-

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Also the third multiplug in the same way as the first-

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Remove both these 8mm head bolts -

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Third one at the back of the EAS housing-

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The assembly can now be moved towards the inner wing a small amount and allow access to the pipe fittings and filter.

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The brass pipe fittings have to be pushed into the housing and then the pipe can be pulled out. The pipes should stay in their positions, but make a note - just to be sure where they go when you reconnect them to the valve block.

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The four numbered pipes shown here will still have residual pressure inside them (they go to each corner of the vehicle). As you pull each pipe out - there will be a hiss as the pressure is released.

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The air filter will unscrew by hand - take care not to crush or otherwise damage it.

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Last pipe - supply to the reservoir. Remove it the same way as the others.

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Remove the cable clamp from the rear.

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The valve block/solenoid assembly can now be lifted out of the housing.

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With a 12mm spanner, remove the short blue pipe.

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2x4mm hex bolts either side of the control unit - note the brackets either end and their locations. Remove all 4 bolts.

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With the control unit out of the way - you can now see the valve housing.

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The repair kit - part number STC1803. Not a lot for almost £40.

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Undo the 4 bolts and the valve housing will come away from the valve block. There is a spring in the valve block - take care not to lose it.

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The valve housing - carefully pick the valve and O-ring out with a small screwdriver.

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The damaged valve-

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Assemble the new valve like this-

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Lick the edge of the new valve assembly and carefully press it in the housing - taking care not to damage it. Use your nails (if you have any!)

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Then the new O-ring-

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Carefully fit the valve housing back onto the valve block - making sure that the spring fits in the centre of the valve-

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Fit the new bolts/washers and tighten progressively. These bolts are already coated with thread lock and don't need to be very tight.

Reassemble in the exact reversal of how you just took it all apart - push the pipes in as far as they will go and then tug each one backwards to make sure it's locked in place. The other pipe fittings are brass and once again are not very tight. The threads are fine and can easily be stripped. Once all is back together, start the engine and allow it to idle. If you place your hand on the pump you can feel it running. Recharging the system takes about 20-minutes, and once the pump stops, go through the various ride height settings to make sure everything is ok.

That's it - your bum is safe :D

Thanks to Mr Beaumont for some advice on how to do this job - cheques in the post etc etc :D .

Les.

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No tech post by Les is correct without at least one smart arse comment from the forum, so here goes ;);););)

While you have the valve block out I would recommend also replacing the small O rings in each valve block outlet. The are inside the push on fittings that the airspring pipes connect on to.

Cheers

Steve :):)

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  • 1 year later...

The answer to this question is made more complicated by the fact that two different tanks are used, and the drain plugs are of different sizes. When doing a Pressure Test via the Drain plug (the standard Workshop Manual procedure).

Up to VIN TA340460 the tank is ANR3645, use Service tool Adapter LRT-60-001.

From VIN TA340461 the tank is ANR5135, use Service tool Adapter LRT-60-001 with adapter LRT-60-006.

Note that the tanks on the Classic are different numbers again,

Up to VIN SA654292 the tank is NTC9825 (this tank contains a Pressure Switch port), use Service tool Adapter LRT-60-001.

From VIN SA654293 the tank is ANR3754 (no Pressure Switch port), use Service tool Adapter LRT-60-001 with adapter LRT-60-006.

The thread sizes are not specified in the documentation I have.

I haven't tried looking for the specifications of the Service Tools, nor have I tried looking in Microcat for the Drain Plugs to see if the thread is given in the description.

Note that these are not plain plugs, they have a groove cut down most of the threads, so that when loosened a couple of turns the pressure is released in a gradual manner, to minimise the risk of the plug being ejected with 100 psi+ behind it.

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  • 4 weeks later...
The answer to this question is made more complicated by the fact that two different tanks are used, and the drain plugs are of different sizes. When doing a Pressure Test via the Drain plug (the standard Workshop Manual procedure).

Up to VIN TA340460 the tank is ANR3645, use Service tool Adapter LRT-60-001.

From VIN TA340461 the tank is ANR5135, use Service tool Adapter LRT-60-001 with adapter LRT-60-006.

Note that the tanks on the Classic are different numbers again,

Up to VIN SA654292 the tank is NTC9825 (this tank contains a Pressure Switch port), use Service tool Adapter LRT-60-001.

From VIN SA654293 the tank is ANR3754 (no Pressure Switch port), use Service tool Adapter LRT-60-001 with adapter LRT-60-006.

The thread sizes are not specified in the documentation I have.

I haven't tried looking for the specifications of the Service Tools, nor have I tried looking in Microcat for the Drain Plugs to see if the thread is given in the description.

Note that these are not plain plugs, they have a groove cut down most of the threads, so that when loosened a couple of turns the pressure is released in a gradual manner, to minimise the risk of the plug being ejected with 100 psi+ behind it.

Thank you David for this complete answer.

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  • 2 years later...

Thanks for that :) The kit I used was genuine, so understandably expensive. I'm not sure that the bolts need replacing, as they are not overly tight anyway, but there you go. Nice to see people use these threads and appreciate them. Sadly, appreciative comments on the help from the tech archive is an increasingly rare thing.

Les :)

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