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k&n filter oil


pinny
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Use the proper stuff as its tiddle thin wouldnt recomend engine oil at all especially if you have an air flow meter or maf as the oil will upset the readings.

The proper oil lasts for years as you use very little when cleaning the filter.

Lynall

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I've got some you can have for free. Then you can save up for a rebore.

im beginning to agree with you when you clean it you can see through it it a good job it aint dusty around here at the moment im back on paper filter which at least has a filtering effect chris

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As an ex-Essex lad myself I don't remember it being very dusty around there unless there is a drought (which is the least of your problems at the moment). I made the mistake of thinking that with a Mantec snorkel and lots of re-oiling the filter would work. Luckily I took it off before I completely destroyed my bores (pictures available). I got by with a set of new KS rings and honing. That was at 100k miles, I now have 160k miles and the engine is ok, not perfect, but I am saving up for the inevitable rebore, in fact I have all the bits required in the garage ready :)

The silly thing is not long after I fitted the thing a T@y*ot% owner came up to me at a garage and told me that I should not use it. (I had a sticker on the side of the bonnet). As he owned a rice-burner I took no notice. :wacko:

I have kept the thng, dunno why, maybe I'll fit it to a lawn mower one of these days. I reckon it would make a good pre-cleaner upstream from a paper filter. But it would look a bit silly stuck on top of the snorkel. :o

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As an ex-Essex lad myself I don't remember it being very dusty around there unless there is a drought (which is the least of your problems at the moment). I made the mistake of thinking that with a Mantec snorkel and lots of re-oiling the filter would work. Luckily I took it off before I completely destroyed my bores (pictures available). I got by with a set of new KS rings and honing. That was at 100k miles, I now have 160k miles and the engine is ok, not perfect, but I am saving up for the inevitable rebore, in fact I have all the bits required in the garage ready :)

The silly thing is not long after I fitted the thing a T@y*ot% owner came up to me at a garage and told me that I should not use it. (I had a sticker on the side of the bonnet). As he owned a rice-burner I took no notice. :wacko:

I have kept the thng, dunno why, maybe I'll fit it to a lawn mower one of these days. I reckon it would make a good pre-cleaner upstream from a paper filter. But it would look a bit silly stuck on top of the snorkel. :o

this week ive been working in fields of cut wheat driving a jcb 3cx this has 2 air filters internal and external took it out today it must of weighed twice its weight full of chaff and dust i think if this was a kn it would pass through the mesh so i think ill stick to paper filters like you said cheaper than rebore etc chris

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Hi all... my two-bobs worth...

Note that filter oils typically are a very different formulation to lubricating oils. They go on as a liquid, but then become very tacky after coming in contact with air and the filter media, which minimises oil loss (incl through the MAF = poor running, etc), and promotes dirt capture and low restriction. I would recommend strongly against using anything but the recommended oil for a foam or cotton-type reusable filter for the reasons above. Also note how much (or little) you should use - a light covering is all that is required, usually. I am running a hand-me-down (thanks bro') K&N pod filter, but will change over to the factory air box and paper filter as soon as I can find the bits (I bought mine second hand with a foam pod fitted because of the LPG set-up).

I personally believe that a quality paper filter (esp as big as the factory one) will provide excellent dirt capture, whilst causing an insignificant level of flow restriction. Cheap to replace too, and you don't have to stuff around cleaning the buggers every 10k. IIRC K&N state that their filters capture "99%" of the dirt that a paper element would.

If you really believe the factory set-up is restrictive, get an accurate calibrated vacuum gauge and plumb it into the intake just after the filter (but before MAF, etc) and go out and redline your engine at WOT. If the gauge shows that you are pulling a significant vacuum (remember that 1kPa = approx 1% power/torque loss), and you often drive under these conditions, then a change may be warranted. otherwise, I'd argue that LR spent many millions of pounds developing and validating the system in all sorts of conditions and it's probably reasonably optimised...

Having said the above, a friend of mine always fits K&Ns and has found that they won't pass water. He found this out during a river crossing that went a bit awry in his XJ Jeep. His intake sucked water, the filter got wet, the engine stopped... but there was no water downstream of the filter element, and therefore no engine damage was done. He gave it a tap, let it dry on top of the engine while he had a cuppa, and then drove off. I haven't tried it myself, and don't plan to... The problem with paper filters is they go soggy when wet and implode = water gets through and engine goes bang. But then again, there are always snorkels...

I don't have the link with me, but a guy did a comparison of paper vs cotton vs foam, etc on his MX-5 and posted the results on the web. He was based in Western Australia, but that's about all I can recall. I'll see if I can find it and post the link for those interested. Long story short, he found that the paper element was the most effective at cleaning the air.

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I don't have the link with me, but a guy did a comparison of paper vs cotton vs foam, etc on his MX-5 and posted the results on the web. He was based in Western Australia, but that's about all I can recall. I'll see if I can find it and post the link for those interested. Long story short, he found that the paper element was the most effective at cleaning the air.

Found it... http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/

Click on the "Air Filtration Test" tab on the left.

Some interesting stuff on oils, too...

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Seems that hotwire MAF's really don't like filter oil, I can understand why. I'm using an ITG filter at the moment simply because someone gave it to me :D but I am not convinced about it's filtration properties and may well go back to paper.

I can understand running a cleanable one in very poor conditions where you could clean it every day without deterioration. I may well "demote" the ITG to off-roading duties and use paper for long haul / everyday.

One question - when you re-oil a K&N, where does all the dirty oil end up? If we have established that the filter material is not fine enough to catch dirt on its own, when you coat it with oil what's to stop the dirt going through to the inside and then being ingested, with some oil, into the engine? :huh:

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I don't drive through much deep powdery sand in the UK so I have no need to use paper filters when racing.

I use oil filters in my racer and also my road cars...

I notice a marked improvment when using a good quality air filter when competing.

ITG and K&N I have never tried the Green ones.

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You can buy industrial filter oil that works in the same way as the K&N stuff. We use it on our machines at work.

As for using free flow filters on cars etc...bin em unless you want to shorten the life of your engine.

Yes...the K&N's will give better performance due to the free flow effect that the bigger gauze offers...but having used them in a few engines here I soon went back to paper filters after I'd opened up a few V8's running ree flow airfilters.

The sludge I found in the sump and vallies was like a fine silt.

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Round here you don't have to go off-road to get a lot of dust in your filter, just drive to work and back on tarmac! As it hardly ever rains for 6 months of the year it gets dusty even if you don't really notice. For example, we find the change intervals for a TD5 paper air filter to be too long. I think LR recommends 20k kilometers. At that distance the filter gets so clogged it gets half sucked into the intake and then the filtration is zero. We change the filters on every 10k (6k miles) service. Some of the old Classic RR flat paper filters had wire reinforcement to stop the filter collapsing, but the more modern Disco I tdi and V8 filters and the Disco II filters have no reinforcement. These are Cooper filters.

One must remember that a turbo diesel running at one bar is actually using the same amount of air as a 5 litre N/A diesel, so the 300tdi and especially the TD5 use more air than the V8.

Brian has a 6.2l GM V8 diesel with two HUGE Donaldson air filters fitted, both are about the equivalent of two 300tdi round filters. This is in a Disco I. So that's really what you need, bloody huge filters if you can fit them in.

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