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could it be my viscous coupling?


diesel dave
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hi all. over the last few days i,ve noticed a steering wheel wobble when cornering. doesn't do it when in a straight line.also the steering seems a little stiff (compared to my pajero). i took off the steering uj assy to check for any siezed joints, all ok,then i decided to try it with the steering damper off. now when i corner while under power i get a massive wobble , which continues unless i back off the throttle. it seems similar to cornering my old series 2a whilst in 4wd. i have'nt got loose wheels, and it isn,t a tracking or wheel balance problem. i presume it could be a worry with the viscous drive in the transfer box. is there any way of checking this,or is it possible to try it with the front prop removed. any ideas gratefully received. by the way it is a rrc 300tdi auto

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There's a post a bit further down the page that covers this, but I think there are two possible causes:

1. Swivel preload and or bearings.

2. Siezed v/c.

To check the v/c jack up one wheel with the vehicle in neutral (main gearbox obviously) wheels chocked and handbrake off. Grip the tyre at 3 and 9 o'clock and try and rotate the wheel. It is pretty hard to turn it - you will have to put some effort in, but it should turn slowly with a constant resistance. If it turns freely or not at all then the v/c is toast.

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There's a post a bit further down the page that covers this, but I think there are two possible causes:

1. Swivel preload and or bearings.

2. Siezed v/c.

To check the v/c jack up one wheel with the vehicle in neutral (main gearbox obviously) wheels chocked and handbrake off. Grip the tyre at 3 and 9 o'clock and try and rotate the wheel. It is pretty hard to turn it - you will have to put some effort in, but it should turn slowly with a constant resistance. If it turns freely or not at all then the v/c is toast.

many thanks for reply, will go and check now!

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:unsure: Could be the VC jack it up and try to turn it with the wheel brace or a bib bar. With effort it should turn, if it locks solid VC goosed. Not too bad a job to change, remove front prop, only 8 bolts on the housing, support the gearbox as you take one mount off with it and its off, new unit slots in and rebolt it all. Just done it on daughters rusty wreck took a morning.
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I presume you can test for faulty viscous lock by jacking 1 wheel and running engine in drive and wheel should turn, mine is not thats why im asking... lol ?

Had to read this three times to check that I am reading it right before shouting:

Please... No-o-o-o-o-o! :o

By running the engine while in drive with one corner jacked you are risking severe personal injury from a whole variety of causes. :ph34r:

The post higher up gives the method for testing the VC which does not involve running the engine:

To check the v/c jack up one wheel with the vehicle in neutral (main gearbox obviously) wheels chocked and handbrake off. Grip the tyre at 3 and 9 o'clock and try and rotate the wheel. It is pretty hard to turn it - you will have to put some effort in, but it should turn slowly with a constant resistance. If it turns freely or not at all then the v/c is toast.

Roger (TwoSheds)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Cheers guys....

No wheel wont turn, even jacked both front wheels up against a wall and they wont turn, back wheel spun on the rear on the deck !!

Is there a light that is suppose to come on, on the dash when diff locked

Feels ok on the road though, steering not heavy and dont seem to scrub tyres..

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No diff lock light because it's essentially permanently engaged. The viscous coupling just stiffens up and locks the diff as the prop shafts start to spin at different speeds. In normal road conditions the ratio of prop rotation speeds is insufficient to cause the coupling to be very stiff, but as one axle starts to spin the resistance of the coupling increases forcing both prop shafts to rotate together. That's my understanding, anyway :)

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