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90 2.5 petrol & Weber carbs


gerard
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Hi all

I'm thinking of getting a new carb for my 2.5 petrol and have discovered that there are 2 different carbs listed.

Weber 32/34 DMTL 6/101 Weber part no: 2267007301

Weber 32/34 DMTL 7/101 2267013700

Any one any idea what the difference between these is?

I can find the 7/101 easy enough, but not the other.

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Not sure what the differences are but I've got two or three 2.5 carbs in the garage, none of which I now need as its got a TDi in it. One was bought new (about £200 I think!) to get it through the MOT and was only on there about 3 months before the engine change. Could be open to offers...

Richard

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According to the Haynes guide only the DMTL 1, 1/101 and 6/101 appear to be listed as an LR carbs, although it is possible that someone has misread the 1/101 as 7/101. I think the 32/34 DMTL was fitted to quite a few other cars. So far as I am aware the only important bit is how it is jetted and the jets are easily replaced.

post-491-1190695908_thumb.jpg

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land Rover have 2 parts listed early type ETC6350 to engine E/N 17H08822C and later ETC 7144 from engine E/N 17H08822C.

Weber on their list show the 2 http://www.webcon.co.uk/Downloads/Weber%20...ist%2012-05.pdf

Yet everything else indicates one as per the Haynes manual. :rolleyes:

Hence the confusion!

The later ones are more common and cheaper...hence my wondering what the difference really is?

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The differences are minor and if I couldn't get a genuine land rover 32/34 DMTL I'd fit one from any other car and just re-jet it ,these guys have all the bits ... Fast Road Cars

O.T.O.H. What's wrong with the one you have, a full weber service kit is only about £17 and there isn't much that actually wears out that isn't covered by the service kit (I think the only unfixable bit is wear in the throttle spindle that would mean re-bushing).

I used a service kit myself some years ago, not long after I got mine and it was pretty straight forward, I also have a replacement standing by (picked up from ebay for about £5). The only issues I have ever had have been with the jets becoming blocked, see thread here .. Help 2.5 petrol

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The solenoid seem to have packed up. When you switch the engine off, it still keeps going, or turning over.

The posts I had seen suggested the solenoids etc are expensive....a new carb seemed easier and less expensive...£110.

Hassle factor I guess.

Could be open to offers...

Richard how much would you be looking for?

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The solenoid seem to have packed up. When you switch the engine off, it still keeps going, or turning over.

I would have thought that with the ignition switched off there would be no power to the coil and hence no spark. This would imply compression ignition. I only ever had this once when the idle jet blocked, so to compensate and get me home I upped the idle speed by screwing out the cable adjuster for an idle of about 1.5-2k, when I came to stop the engine carried on for a while which puzzled me ... looking at the manual it looks as if the stop solenoid only works on the idle fuel circuit (i.e. when you switch off you usually come off the throttle) so with the increased idle the stop solenoid didn't work because the petrol was getting in via the primary circuit, could it be that you have the idle set too high.

Alternatively the stop solenoid is easily tested by unscrewing it and testing it with 12v or simply switching the ignition off and on.

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Thanks for the help and reply.

Having read a fair bit, I set the timing by ear and reduced the idle speed (my taco is bust...so by ear again!)

Got rid of the back fire on over-run and the engine stops now!

Checked with a timing light....no where near TDC but it works!

I looked at the number on my carb....6/100. Different again.

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Well....maybe I was too hasty! :rolleyes:

The backfiring is still there on over-run.

So I decided to start again. Set the dwell. Tried to get the idle at 600...not a chance. So I cleaned the carb & jets (one at a time so they went back where they came from). She idled like a dream. no lumpiness or coughs, just very smooth.

Set the timing to 16BTDC at 2000rpm as the manual says (vacuum disconnected).

Still back firing on the over-run and when you come to a stop the engine cuts out if the revs are at 600rpm, they need to be higher.

Could it be the mixture in the carb? Is there an easy way to set this w/o a gas meter?

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. :)

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Backfiring on the overrun is usually a sign of a retarded timing. Mine still pops ever so slightly, but I wanted the timing adjusted so that it is just backed off from pinking under a heavy load.

I always set mine by ear (I fitted a magnetronic module to replace the points and condenser), I did eventually win a nice snap-on strobe on ebay and out of curiosity I found it was timed at about 22BTDC @ 2000rpm with the vacuum advance disconnected. I put the extra advance down to the fact the green manual gives the settings for 2 star leaded petrol.

With respect to setting the idle mixture the following link gives some guidelines that could be used for the DMTL

Carb setup

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Thanks hairyone.

I've set the timing to 22BTDC @ 2000rpm with the vacuum advance disconnected. It is much much better.

I didn't realise about the 2 star.....seems along time ago!!!

I set the carb up as per instructions too.

Thanks so much for the help.

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  • 11 years later...

Hello, I would like to add that the carburetor 32/34 DMTL for Land Rover 90/110 Defender 2.5 Petrol ETC6350 to engine E/N 17H08822C and later ETC 7144 from engine E/N 17H08822C in general is very sensitive to pick up tiny particles in the idle jet which in turn causes above mentioned problems. The carb needs to be dismantled and properly blown out with pressure air in jets and channels. It will run as new afterwards. It’s a well constructed carb for fuel economy/power but not tolerant to dirt particles, that may enter via the air or fuel. Tiny particles that passes through the filters accumulate in the carb where they aggregates to large particles which finally reaches enough size to cause a blockage. The defender drives very well with this engine, far better than with diesel engine in my opinion, and fuel consumption for highway in 90km/h is 11.2 liter per 100 km. Make carburettor cleaning a routine maintainance. 

Edited by LandRoverSE
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