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Removing tough lacquer from Aluminium


Geminidawn
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The job is to remove a tough old lacquer from an otherwise bare aluminium. The laquer is all yellow, stained, looks unattractive and is in need of refurbishing other than that it is sound, hard as nails and stuck in well. So what is the best way to remove the lacquer without causing any wear or damage to the Aluminium. I was thinking on a chemical strippers like Nitromors but dose anyone out there have a better idea?

Furthermore would using a chemical strippers cause problems when re-coating?

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Don't know if it's the same stuff, but new panels come with a semi-transparent coating on them which is actually an anti-oxidant. I tried to remove this stuff with paint stripper with no success. I was told that it was etch prime, but it isn't and paint adhesion is very poor. I had to key the entire surface with 800-grit wet/dry in the end.

This is what the new wings looked like when I got them:-

med_gallery_2_28_341254.jpg

I don't know if this is the same thing as you have, but it's the only 'yellow laquer' that I can think of that's on bare alloy.

Les.

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I don't know if this is the same thing as you have, but it's the only 'yellow laquer' that I can think of that's on bare alloy.

Les.

Aye, pretty much the same thing but this lacquer was to be the finished look, full gloss, etched into bare aluminium, solely to prevent oxidisation. I'm sure it looked great in it's day but after many years of exposure to UV the adhesion properties have remained but the clarity did not and now it looks yellow, stained and patchy and it really needs to be removed.

The new owner already tried mechanical means via wire cup brush but this just burnt the lacquer and caused more damage to the alloy.

I think Nitromors but this may as stated have no effect, some one else who knows a bit about the Auto restoration trade has even suggested blasting it with crushed Walnut shells :huh:

Maybe there are other less mainstream more successful methods.

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Cresylic acid, a by product of coal distillation will probably do it. This is the basis of many professional dips. Its a heavy oily brown liquid that smells stongly of creosote or phenyl. (Don't stick your nose near it, if it's the real thing you'll smell it from afar)

I don't have any idea where you may purchase it in UK, probably a chemical distributor, but be careful, it's nasty stuff and can only be removed with organic (carbon based) liquids, dieseline on your skin or thinners/turps to prepare parts for painting.

Use out in the open air, apply it as you would paint stripper.

Wear goggles or better still a visor and plastic apron at the very least, and wash off any splashes immediately!

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