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WOODEN GARAGE


muddydisco
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I've got a wooden workshop.

Slab concrete floor, concrete blocks to about 3 feet all round, then 4x2 construction with featherboard on the walls and a chipboard / waterproof felt roof. In the process of being insulated and ply lined.

I'll post some pics of construction if you need. Are you thinking about biulding it yourself?

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I've got a wooden workshop.

Slab concrete floor, concrete blocks to about 3 feet all round, then 4x2 construction with featherboard on the walls and a chipboard / waterproof felt roof. In the process of being insulated and ply lined.

I'll post some pics of construction if you need. Are you thinking about biulding it yourself?

Yes thinking of building one photo's would be great help. I think with wood it,s warm and it's keeps the noise in.

cheers aaron

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I've got one 6.5m x 9m double with a workbench across one end. If I built it again I would line it properly as it is a bit draughty in the winter time - you can build garages here by just attaching cladding to the timber framing and that is how mine was done to save costs but I regret it now. Not sure what the building regulations are elsewhere though, you might not be able to use such a simple method of construction.

One more bit of advice. Don't use Hendersons roller doors under any circumstances - they are the most godawful overpriced under-specified pieces of cr&p I have ever come across.

The only disadvantage of wood is that you get paranoid when grinding etc with sparks flying everywhere....

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a block or brick wall will be warmer, and drier.

I dunno about that. Mine is concrete floor, blockwork walls timber rafters (plus steel I-beam) and a felt & tiled roof, and its utterly freezing in winter.

The problem is its got so much thermal inertia that it stays cold even as the day warms up in winter time, so I get to the point where I have to go and stand outside to 'warm' up (should be busier I guess...)!

None of mine is insulated, but a stove is now a priority.

If I was building one, I'd at least do a few courses of blockwork to fend off the aforementioned sparks, and to mount an I-beam on (even if its just two 'columns').

Al.

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I have a woodern garage

9m x 3.5 m with a pitched roof

Made it from recycled timber cut some old good guailty 8x2 joists x 20' long in half and then used 1" thick treated shiplap board for cladding and treated with sadolin with green bich roof sheets.

All standing on a trowled concrete slab

Can get damp but not wet in the winter - wish that I had lined it with building paper now always the case after as I think this would of stoped the dampness.

The shiplap cladding shrinks and expands alot but overall I'm very pleased and would recommend

Steve

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Mine's lke that Al, but 10 minutes with a cheapie fan heater and all is well again. (except for the concrete floor sucking all the heat out of you when you're lying on your back under the wagon :angry: ), but I suppose you don't have that problem as vapour must float around at a nice manageable height? :lol::lol::P

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Mine's lke that Al, but 10 minutes with a cheapie fan heater and all is well again. (except for the concrete floor sucking all the heat out of you when you're lying on your back under the wagon :angry: ), but I suppose you don't have that problem as vapour must float around at a nice manageable height? :lol::lol::P

Yeah I've got a fan heater, but as soon as you switch it off, the heat just disappears! I'm not overly keen on running a 2kw fan heater all day long. Ans as you say, even then the heat gets sucked right out of your feet - they're totally numb after an hour or so, and thats it for the rest of the day.

The other problem with running a heater is that once the vapour gets hot enough it tends to escape through the cracks around the doors etc. this can get pretty expensive if you've put a lot of money into vapour bling. :( Hence the empty garage... Ahem.

Al.

;)

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Yeah well - it doesn't! :( If you're not working directly in its 'path', it makes bugger all difference.

Hence the stove. A heater would come out of my tool / parts budget, and frankly there's just too much stuff I need for it to ever get bought.

I wonder about some of those radiant 'light' type heaters like you get outside pubs sometimes.

I guess if I was building i'd do some sprayfoam insulation - at least in the roof. the problem is you want strong walls that you can drill into / mounti things on / shower with sparks / throw angry spanners at etc, so covering with insulation is a PITA.

I guess there's nothing you can do for the floor...? Bury pipes way down low in the concrete?

Al.

:)

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I guess there's nothing you can do for the floor...? Bury pipes way down low in the concrete?

Al.

:)

Have a look here, modern electric heating systems may only build up the floor height

by 2-3".

We have similar system in all the flloors in the foundation level of the house. Upstairs we have foil

which works similary to your RWH and is foil based, about 2mm thick.

Lovely toasty floors, imagine being able to walk on tiled or concrete

floors in the winter with no socks or shoes, and have a nice warm feeling under

your feet. Lovely.

You would be able to use your best filipino safety flip-flops and not be cold.

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Looks nice - I'd love to be able to break out the ol' filipino Safety flip flops!

... but... How is that stuff gonna cope with a few tonnes of tools...? How deep would it have to be to hold up a decent sized milling machine? And, when all is said and done, would the milling machine genuinely appreciate having a warm bottom?

Hmm. Nice idea though. Al. :)

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Al,

sorry to go all traditional on you, but making some duck boarding in those areas that you do a lot of standing in will make a world of difference - In front of the bench / Lathe / Mill etc. I made some out of gravel board - 1" thick by 6" wide so well strong enough when made up into boards, and as yet I havn't managed to set them alight with the welder or grinder - They have a few marks on them from when I was using my makeshift forge, but only a little charred...

In terms of lying under your truck, big sheets of cardboard or old carpet work very well as insulators - Our HP servers at work were delivered in big, high quality cardboard boxes, and they are also surprisingly resistant to setting on fire with the welder (I managed to set myself on fire, but not the card I was lying on..).

All tried and tested, and low cost...

Cheers

Mark

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you could always line a timber shed with plasterboard if you want a bit of fire resistance?

we put freebie suspended ceiling in and it made a massive difference to the warmth of the place, run the fireplace and its T shirt warm even in the depths of winter :)

I always found space heaters create huge amounts of condensation :(

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We're too poor to afford fancy heating or insulation so we just wear more clothes. Except dirtydiesel who is protected by his wookie beard and survives in a T-shirt :huh:

Quite how heat dissapears through your boots is beyond me. Are you wearing moccasins or something? Try Riggers, they contain actual sheep to keep your feet toasty

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Yeah, I always wear nice fleecy lined rigger boots. I dunno, where the heat goes either. Following the advice above, I'll staple some cardboard to the soles. If I'm busy (shut it, fridge) I end up sweating in a t-shirt on my top half, and totally numb from about the knees down, by the end of the day! Maybe its me...

>"In terms of lying under your truck..." - My what?

Al. :)

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Underfloor heating can be easy and cheap if you are laying the floor yourself.

Use a single hose attached to a solar collector (black painted secondhand radiators in a glass case) if you can get it lower than the floor it will self flow as well meaning you don't need to pump it. Insulate it well enough and it will keep its heat.

There are some websites detailing DIY solar somewhere, I will have a look...

Edited to add:

DIY solar

and

More stuff

Will :)

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Al - I have a bit of surplus carpet here (it's from a cruise liner) if you want, it's exactly the size of the back of a transit van so probably fit nicely under your truck-shaped-space :P

Like the DIY solar idea, to steal an idea from Twizzle he's done similar but mounted an old household rad behind the wood burner to soak up heat headed for the wall and transport it elsewhere, a very clever setup.

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