Jump to content

Fuel Tank Repairs


Tony Carter
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi:

I have sprung a petrol leak from the tank (it apears to be coming from between the underneath botom belly plate, or cover and the tank body) I guess it was caused by hammer vibration whilst removing the rear crossmember.

My question is, do I buy a new petrol tank, or can I realistically expect to repair the current one ? if so, with what ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steel tanks generally go on the join between the top & bottom halves.

Whilst the slosh sealants might work, it is usually best to replace the tank.

For tanks which have the pump inserted from the top, check to make sure the pickup tube reaches the bottom of the new tank. As to how I know that there can be differences...........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not a massive job to replace the tank and petrol is one of the fluids Land Rover seemed to manage to contain quite well. It isn't the best thing to have leaking from your vehicle :lol:.

Thanks for your help everyone: I will put a new Steel tank in. When putting in the new tank, I assume its normal to put the old fuel pump and sender unit back in, only with new gaskets? Are these readily available ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your help everyone: I will put a new Steel tank in. When putting in the new tank, I assume its normal to put the old fuel pump and sender unit back in, only with new gaskets? Are these readily available ?

When I replaced mine, I kept the old sender which didn't work properly afterwards possibly after being a bit shaken up when getting the old tank out. It can be replaced with the tank in situ. I replaced the pump as it had done about 100K miles which is about the failure point apparently. If you're near that, I'd recommend replacement of the pump as it's easier to deal with than when it's died in the middle of nowhere. It may be obvious, but get the correct pump, the injected engine pumps run at much higher pressure than the carburetteur ones

I can't see which Rangie you've got, but mine was an '89 classic which didn't have a fuel pump access panel in the boot floor, so I took the chance to cut one with the tank out which means I can now get the the pump without removing the tank. There was a good set of instructions with the measurements for cutting from www.rangie.com. I would also recommend replacing any pipes which are inaccessible when the tank's in place as a precaution. The tank on mine had not been removed since the car was built and the pipe work along the top of the tank was pretty knackered.

All the parts were easy to get hold of and relatively cheap.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I replaced mine, I kept the old sender which didn't work properly afterwards possibly after being a bit shaken up when getting the old tank out. It can be replaced with the tank in situ. I replaced the pump as it had done about 100K miles which is about the failure point apparently. If you're near that, I'd recommend replacement of the pump as it's easier to deal with than when it's died in the middle of nowhere. It may be obvious, but get the correct pump, the injected engine pumps run at much higher pressure than the carburetteur ones

I can't see which Rangie you've got, but mine was an '89 classic which didn't have a fuel pump access panel in the boot floor, so I took the chance to cut one with the tank out which means I can now get the the pump without removing the tank. There was a good set of instructions with the measurements for cutting from www.rangie.com. I would also recommend replacing any pipes which are inaccessible when the tank's in place as a precaution. The tank on mine had not been removed since the car was built and the pipe work along the top of the tank was pretty knackered.

All the parts were easy to get hold of and relatively cheap.

Mine is a classic 1988 3.5EFI. Your right about all the fuel pipework looking bad (its very bad) and again your right: there is no access hole in the boot floor should the fuel pump fail in the future.....

Without apearing dim, did you purchase replacement or patern parts for the fuel pipes, or did you have them made up (at a motor mart like brake pipes) , or make them yourself ?

Lastly: I have been offered a "cheap" plastic petrol tank from a vehicle being broken. Does anyone know if a plastic petrol tank will drop straight into my vehicle ?

Thanks in advance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mine is a classic 1988 3.5EFI. Your right about all the fuel pipework looking bad (its very bad) and again your right: there is no access hole in the boot floor should the fuel pump fail in the future.....

Without apearing dim, did you purchase replacement or patern parts for the fuel pipes, or did you have them made up (at a motor mart like brake pipes) , or make them yourself ?

Lastly: I have been offered a "cheap" plastic petrol tank from a vehicle being broken. Does anyone know if a plastic petrol tank will drop straight into my vehicle ?

Thanks in advance.

I got replacement parts, I think they were genuine Land Rover ones and not too pricey and it saved having to bend them to shape. I bought them from Dingocroft in High Wycombe (01494 448367) who posted them out.

I think, but I could be wrong that the plastic tanks are different, having the higher level filler (i.e. not just behind the rear wheel). The mountings may be different too. On the steel tank, you have two parts, the tank itself and the stone shield. The mounting bolts go through both, the plastic one may have straps to hold it on.

I strongly recommend cutting a hole in the boot floor when you've got the tank out, the article on www.rangie.com says that if you're brave enough, it can be done with the tank in-situ (I wasn't!), but at least now I can get to the pump. I cut a square hole and used a couple of bits of steel strip pop rivetted to the floor to hold the cut out in place. It now just drops into place from above and some gaffer tape seals the gaps. Not elegant, but it works. If you're flash you could cut a circular hole.

Note that with the EFi, you have the multi-vent tank with four small venting hoses near the filler pipe. Earlier carb. Rangies have the single vent tank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The early EFi do not have the multivent tank (mine doesn't & is a 1986 EFi). Be sure to check what is actually on your car before ordering a replacement.

I stand corrected. It may be the '89 model year when the change over happened. I initially bought the wrong one from an LR specialist based on the chassis number which indicated the single vent tank, but mine has the multi-vent tank. At least they swapped it for the correct one in the end

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy