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Funny noises that really shouldn't be there


BiggerBaloo
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I've only had my Disco a matter of days, but after getting bored of tarmac already, I ventured up to Langdale Quest to take on the Alpine Adventure with Typsey. I'm extremely impressed with the LR, and it's capabilities. But all the way home, it has been making funny noises. I took it steady, and don't recall any places in particular where I could of done any major damage. I can only liken the sound to that of a knackered wheel bearing on full lock in a normal car. Typsey suggests it could be a UJ, which does almost seem logical. The thing that's confusing me is that it only appears to be noisy while accelerating, especially if turning (like coming from a round about). It wasn't making any unusual noises on the way to Langdale.

I just thought I'd put it to the pros to see what you think before I start spending money I haven't got again ;)

Thanks in advance for any help and suggestions

Martin

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I've just checked all the wheel nuts and they all appear to have been tight. The dislocated spring sounds like something I could easily investigate. It doesn't sound like a CV joint to me, like I said, it does sound like wheel bearing (metal on metal grinding) but would it suddenly go?

Thanks

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check for stones etc jammed in a brake caliper and rubbing on the disc

lost count of the number of "wheel bearings" that have turned up at the garage that have just needed some attention to a rock in the caliper :)

Yeah, there was a pebble stuck in the calliper, but that was vreating a more constant scraping noise while moving. Easily rectified, but the funny noises are still there unfortunately. It almost sounds like the engine is struggling, if I floor it it's a lot louder, and then if I ease off the pedal it goes a lot qiueter. I'm starting to think it must be engine related but I'm stuck! :(

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I've had the disco up on ramps today at a mate's garage. The only thing I can see at fault is a rubber donut type thing between the prop shaft and rear diff. It's shredded to bits but some how still still holding together what it should be. I've stopped using the disco (I have a minibus to get me by for now) until I fix it. I'm going to go to the land rover main dealer asap, but don't really know what to ask for. How do I find out part numbers etc?

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I've had the disco up on ramps today at a mate's garage. The only thing I can see at fault is a rubber donut type thing between the prop shaft and rear diff. It's shredded to bits but some how still still holding together what it should be. I've stopped using the disco (I have a minibus to get me by for now) until I fix it. I'm going to go to the land rover main dealer asap, but don't really know what to ask for. How do I find out part numbers etc?

You need p/no TVF100010 and you will probably find cheaper ones around than Genuine.

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q...earch&meta= brings up lots of returns from Google

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You need p/no TVF100010 and you will probably find cheaper ones around than Genuine.

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q...earch&meta= brings up lots of returns from Google

Nice one, thanks a lot. I went into Land Rover today and tried to explain what it was and got nowhere. I really appreciate the help, but how do I find out the part numbers my self, just for future reference? or can't I?

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Get a parts catalogue, or a "freed" copy of Microcat which can be downloaded from the net in various places I think ;)

Hard copy catalogue is best if you can find one.

Often you can type a description of the part into Google and it will come up with some returns which have part numbers in them but of course no guarantee they are correct!!! Posting a question on here is usually a good way - there are some folks like Western who carry a laptop round at all times with a copy of EPC on it :)

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Personally I'd get a normal prop flange and prop and do away with the donut.

I don't mean to sound like a complete muppet, but can someone tell me exactly what I would need to buy to do that. I want to get back on the road as soon as possible cos I've nearly sold my alternative transport, but I do plan on keeping the Disco as long as possible so am definately up for making it better than standard. I'm fairly competent and have most common tools associated with mechanics (except a welder which I won't need for a while I hope), so I reckon I could put it together properly if I had all the bits.

I'll most likely just get everything I need from devon 4x4, Paddock spares or Land Rover ,main dealers or whatever you guy's recommend ;)

Cheers

Martin

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Hi Martin,

I did this upgrade myself just a week ago (after I sort of blew up my rear diff a bit :ph34r: - refer recent thread). Have a look at the attached screen grabs from EPC for (hopefully) the info you need. You've got the later-type flex-coupling (aka rubber-donut, duroid-coupling, etc). The images show both the UJ-type and the flex-type. The UJ-type has four bolts for mounting, flex has three. Changing from one to the other involves changing the rear driveshaft (propshaft) and also the matching diff companion flange. Tech archives have much info on this (and other threads - suggest you do a quick search). The diff flange is a tight bugger to undo - again a search of the forum will give good advice on tips and tricks. Apart from that it's plug&play and well within the ability of the vaguely spanner literate. :)

I had been chewing through the flex couplings yearly or less :( , and took the opportunity of the diff replacement to upgrade to the earlier UJ set-up. I can report no untoward issues in making this change, except a barely more noticeable clunk/thump when engaging gear or transitioning from drive-coast-drive. No change to driveline running smoothness as the rear diff is well located with very good geometry. I gave the new set-up a thorough "evaluation" over nearly a thousand kms of everything from smooth highway to mountainous axle twisting fun just yesterday, which it passed with flying colours. I can certainly recommend this set-up - well worth the cost/hassle and only requires a dob of grease every now and then. :)

The background on why LR went to the flex joint was to cushion driveline shock, esp. during gear-changes or throttle tip-in/out, etc. It is a less durable joint overall (esp. when the axle is heavily articulated and/or the suspension has been lifted), but it does give a slight improvement to refinement, which is why they made the change. Note that I've heard that it's a really good idea to replace the centre pin on flex-coupled joints if there's any significant wear marks/corrosion/etc as these can accelerate failure dramatically. But, of course, that's only if you stay with that set-up.

The four UJ mounting bolts should be torqued to 47Nm (35 ft.lbs) at each end, the pinion flange to 130Nm (96 ft.lbs). (Flex bolts to 78Nm (58 ft.lbs) for reference). Do the pinion seal at the same time.

Best of luck :)

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