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LPG explosion in a Rangey.


Les Henson
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Must admit its fear of this sort of thing that would make me nervous of LPG.

Why? For this to happen, as others have noted, it must have been a very dodgy conversion - done properly it should be safer than petrol. I wouldn't want to be near any car if the fuel ignited, but if I had to I'd rather it was LPG than petrol - LPG rarely explodes (it has to be pretty near the stoichiometric mix), unlike petrol vapour. Instead you get a fireball that burns inwards until the gas cloud is consumed - despite the article describing it as an explosion it sounds to me like that's what happened here (if it really was an explosion I can't imagine anyone could have jumped out in time). According to my father, who's a safety engineer in the oil industry, as long as you hold your breath and close your eyes as the flame front passes you you'll normally just lose some body hair and get a light 'sunburn'. Compare that to getting burning petrol on you...

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Why? For this to happen, as others have noted, it must have been a very dodgy conversion - done properly it should be safer than petrol.

Granted not the full "article" but thin on facts, rather sensationalist, oh of course it's the SUN, didn't notice till I saw the popup warning about viral emails with a pair of enormous knockers :rolleyes::blink:

It only takes a couple of botched installations to sour public opinion. Aproperly installed system, even if it leaked would have leaked outside through the double skinned pipe and sealed connection box.

What was the source of ignition, maybe the daughter having a fly drag while mother wasn't looking. That they didn't smell it inside the vehicle suggests to me that they have been inhaling it for a long period, LPG will deaden sensitivty to it like that.

Having experienced both liquid fires & gas flashes being in the marine & petroleum industry I will choose a gas flash over a liquid fire any day of the week.

Edited by Niall_CSK
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It only takes a couple of botched installations to sour public opinion. A properly installed system, even if it leaked would have leaked outside through the double skinned pipe and sealed connection box.

The French aren't allowed to install their own Lpg, as a result of incidents such as the guy who was flame cutting his tank to remove it from the car [possibly not properly emptied either], with obvious consequences. :o safety-consciousness must be cultural :rolleyes:

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From that second article it seems obvious that there was a serious fault with the installation/system. The fact the windscreen blew out and the doors were bent out by the explosion when the driver turned on the ignition key, means that the car must have been full of gas.

This suggests that the tank had no sealed vent to the outside at the very least. It also suggests that as well as no sealed vent to the outside, there must have been a considerable leak for there to have been enough gas in the Rangie for cumbustion to take place.

I would have thought that the inside of the Rangie must have absolutely stunk of raw LPG, and shouldn't have been started.

Sadly, as has been stated, this may be picked up and made a sensationalist story which will (wrongly) put people off LPG.

Diff

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Well the guy may have smelled gas, but to be fair, when you disconnect the nozzle there's a 'chuff' of gas which you smell if the wind is in the right direction. If a window or door is open when you disconnect, then it's possible the smell would go inside the vehicle. If the system was a DIY install, then it should have been inspected shouldn't it for Insurance purposes? I thought you needed a certificate of installation or something.

Les. :)

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If the system was a DIY install, then it should have been inspected shouldn't it for Insurance purposes? I thought you needed a certificate of installation or something.

Depends on the insurer - mine (NFU) require a certificate, but I'm told increasing numbers aren't bothering with them. There's nothing 'official' about the certificates anyway, although the LPGA would like you to think otherwise - they're just a trade body. That said, if you go for an LPGA certified garage you know they've at least had some training. If you do it yourself, I think it's only about £25 to get the vehicle checked and certified (that's at least a year out of date and may be trade price, though). Worth it for your own piece of mind, I'd have thought.

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Depends on the insurer - mine (NFU) require a certificate, but I'm told increasing numbers aren't bothering with them. There's nothing 'official' about the certificates anyway, although the LPGA would like you to think otherwise - they're just a trade body. That said, if you go for an LPGA certified garage you know they've at least had some training. If you do it yourself, I think it's only about £25 to get the vehicle checked and certified (that's at least a year out of date and may be trade price, though). Worth it for your own piece of mind, I'd have thought.

:lol: why does the Ladies Professional Golf Association [LPGA] care about propane installations? :lol:LPGA

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