Jump to content

Jack seals


hattymender

Recommended Posts

I've just had a 2 ton 'professional' trolley jack donated to my expanding collection. Nice long bed and good lift but it has a leak on the input piston. It sinks about 2" per hour. Looks like if you remove the link pins for the handle socket you can get at the nut that the piston shaft passes through. Anybody stripped one? Are they normally lip seals or is it a gland?

Rich

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've just had a 2 ton 'professional' trolley jack donated to my expanding collection. Nice long bed and good lift but it has a leak on the input piston. It sinks about 2" per hour. Looks like if you remove the link pins for the handle socket you can get at the nut that the piston shaft passes through. Anybody stripped one? Are they normally lip seals or is it a gland?

Rich

I guess it depends on the make. My SIP one is a lip seal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IIRC they are quite easy to take apart - a bit like a brake cylinder. I think the seals may be similar. You should be able to get a repair kit direct from the maker if you know who that is :)

Failing that, do a search on Yell.com for hydraulic engineers - there should be someone near you. Anyone that refurbs hydraulic cylinders should be able to help.

However, if it is losing height over a couple of hours, it may just need bleeding and some new hydraulic fluid. Thinking back to when I used to load test trolley jacks (a long long time ago) - make sure the jack is lowered, tighten the release screw, prise off the fluid filler cap, take a firm grasp of the lifting cup, and pull the lifting arm up to it's full height and push it back down (be careful, there is likely to be resistance from the spring) four or five times. Make sure the fluid level is ok and put the filler cap back on. Hopefully it will now be ok.

Edited to add: I'm sure that is the right proceedure :unsure: - if not, the only differential will be having the release screw undone - but try the above first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have two of these jacks which need servicing

one is ok and drops a little but the other one is quit bad and drops in minutes.

Ryan is that a volunteer to fix mine and then post the pic's on here :lol:;)

I've never actually (cough) taken one apart. I only saw it being done...a long long time ago. I worked for Halfrauds for almost 10 years and spent 3 of them working in the Quality Department (yes they did have one :P - don't know if they do now, I left before they weresold off by Boots). One of my jobs in the last year or two, was batch testing the then new Halfords Trolley Jacks (the yellow and black jobbies). The engineer that ended up with the responsibility of the jacks, and the person that wrote the test procedure, was a hydraulics engineer of many years and used to own a company that supplied Halfords many many moons ago with Halfords brand jacks (I think they were silver). It was he who showed me how to bleed the cylinder, and took a couple apart in front of me. That is the limit of my techical ability :lol:

he can do a write up for the tech archive! :ph34r:

See above :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy