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MogLite
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For the peeps in the UK

This is going to be the darkest weekend of the winter, the shortest day is early next week.

<Grabs coat>

We've almost got over the worst of the winter...........

Well, i am off to spain sometime next week to play with the boat ,, hopefully a little warmer !!! :)

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He's got you there Andy

which is why christians celebrate their day on the ancient pagan day of 25th december. this is the first day which you can see a difference in the length of the day.

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Hmm, sorry Andy, although the earliest sunset occurs a little before the solstice as you say, the latest sunrise occurs proportionally AFTER the solstice, making the shortest day ON the solstice (sort of the average of the two).

Have to wear your double-insulated rubber sailor's outfit for a bit longer I'm afraid...

Of course the earlier minimum sunset time does mean you get longer evenings a little sooner, which is good, but then you lose it again before the next winter solstice, so you don't get anything for free!

Al.

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I thought it was all to do with some geazer with a frigid mother and a star not some bunch of tree huggers round a bunch of stones in freezing wiltshire.

:o:P

they hijacked the pagan festival and decided that was when he was born. Have you noticed that 2000 yrs later they still cant work out what date he died. Easter keeps moving every year :)

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It's because of the tilt of the Earths axis of rotation relative to the sun.

If the sun is over the equator, the 'terminator' - that is the line between night and day over the planet's surface, not the metal politician with a Uzi 9mm and a dodgy German accent - is perpedicular (90 degrees) to the equator.

If the sun dips below the equator (by the nutation of the Earths rotation axis - which is where our seasons come from), the illuminated patch on the sphere of the planet no longer has an 'edge line' - the terminator again - that is perpendicular to the equator. Therefore, sunset occurs at different times for places at the same longitude (e.g. same time zone) for any time of year other than the equinoxes (equini?!?).

So you (maybe) can envisage that the sunrise and sunset times kind of slip past each other - the difference becoming greatest at a solstice, and zero at an equinox.

Hope that clears it up a bit? :huh:

Al. :)

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It's because of the tilt of the Earths axis of rotation relative to the sun.

If the sun is over the equator, the 'terminator' - that is the line between night and day over the planet's surface, not the metal politician with a Uzi 9mm and a dodgy German accent - is perpedicular (90 degrees) to the equator.

If the sun dips below the equator (by the nutation of the Earths rotation axis - which is where our seasons come from), the illuminated patch on the sphere of the planet no longer has an 'edge line' - the terminator again - that is perpendicular to the equator. Therefore, sunset occurs at different times for places at the same longitude (e.g. same time zone) for any time of year other than the equinoxes (equini?!?).

So you (maybe) can envisage that the sunrise and sunset times kind of slip past each other - the difference becoming greatest at a solstice, and zero at an equinox.

Hope that clears it up a bit? :huh:

Al. :)

How do you know all this usless carp :lol:

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It's because of the tilt of the Earths axis of rotation relative to the sun.

If the sun is over the equator, the 'terminator' - that is the line between night and day over the planet's surface, not the metal politician with a Uzi 9mm and a dodgy German accent - is perpedicular (90 degrees) to the equator.

If the sun dips below the equator (by the nutation of the Earths rotation axis - which is where our seasons come from), the illuminated patch on the sphere of the planet no longer has an 'edge line' - the terminator again - that is perpendicular to the equator. Therefore, sunset occurs at different times for places at the same longitude (e.g. same time zone) for any time of year other than the equinoxes (equini?!?).

So you (maybe) can envisage that the sunrise and sunset times kind of slip past each other - the difference becoming greatest at a solstice, and zero at an equinox.

Hope that clears it up a bit? :huh:

Al. :)

Al, You really really need to get a Television or go out more.

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Al, You really really need to get a Television or go out more.

Eh? You get to watch TV at work?!? Now that IS a good job! :blink:

Andy - I'll draw you a picture when you're in Paris, perhaps one of the ladies in the Moulin Rouge can lend you a pen...? ;)

Actually, this idea is growing on me - how long can you escape the Misses for...?! B) ...or maybe she'd like to join us? B) B) B)

Al.

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when you're in Paris, perhaps one of the ladies in the Moulin Rouge can lend you a pen...? ;)

Actually, this idea is growing on me - how long can you escape the Misses for...?! B) ...or maybe she'd like to join us? B) B) B)

Al.

Easy tiger this is a family forum

:lol::lol:

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