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Vacuum Line one-way valve


RPR
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This is just plain stupid. For the life of me, I cannot seem to convince myself one way or another. The vacuum line from my manifold out to my remote servo has a one-way valve. What I cannot onvince myself of is that the one way valve should allow flow from the servo to the manifold, i.e. vacuum. This makes perfect sense, but then.....

Can someone please confirm? Abuse deserved and accepted....

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You see what I mean??? Let me try again. Am I correct that the valve should be set up such that the vacuum created in the manifold is "pulling" air from the servo to the manifold, i.e. flow from servo to manifold rather than from manifold to servo..... :blink:

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Shouldn't it be from the manifold to the servo, my servo has a one way [non-return] valve on it which is connected to the vacuum pump. so the pump [vacuum] sucks the servo diaphragm.

RPR, I wonder will this help?

from the WWW somewhere :)

"The automobile engine produces vacuum as a by-product of normal operation and is freely available for use in powering accessories such as the power brake booster. Vacuum enters the booster through a check valve on the booster. The check valve is connected to the engine with a rubber hose and acts as a one-way valve that allows vacuum to enter the booster but does not let it escape. The booster is an empty shell that is divided into two chambers by a rubber diaphragm. There is a valve in the diaphragm that remains open while your foot is off the brake pedal so that vacuum is allowed to fill both chambers. When you step on the brake pedal, the valve in the diaphragm closes, separating the two chambers and another valve opens to allow air in the chamber on the brake pedal side. This is what provides the power assist. "

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well this is confusing since you are discussing the flow of vacuum.

someone will correct me but the vacuum (i.e. lack of air in the manifold) varies according to engine rpm load etc.

the valve is so fitted so that once the air is sucked out of the servo, i.e. it has vacuum in it, when the vacuum in the manifold decreases i.e. more air in it, this air does not get into the servo to reduce the vacuum.

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well this is confusing since you are discussing the flow of vacuum.

someone will correct me but the vacuum (i.e. lack of air in the manifold) varies according to engine rpm load etc.

the valve is so fitted so that once the air is sucked out of the servo, i.e. it has vacuum in it, when the vacuum in the manifold decreases i.e. more air in it, this air does not get into the servo to reduce the vacuum.

Thanks. This is actually a very clear explanation. My blond moment is over...

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Well, on the coldest night of the year so far (derision from the Canucks neither requested nor welcome) -9* nubbins here decides to put the servo line in so I can get it to pass inspection before heading off road this weekend (rethinking unless a heatwave is on the way!!!). Despite the loss of vast quantities of skin and potentially one ear to frostbite, I was successful. Bloody hell it makes a difference to the braking!!! :o

I have no idea what application the remote servo I have was intended for. It's fairly large! Anyway, with 11" twin leading shoes all round on the Volvo axles, it stops fairly sharpish!!!! It's pulling a bit left but I'm hoping it will pass inspection. The charming thing here is that the MOT is done by private garages and if you know the chap, he can tell you whether it will pass or not so that you don't get a quick deadline for redress and a fine if you can't meet it...

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Bloody hell it makes a difference to the braking!!! :o

well done!

Yes, the servo makes a big difference and is very noticeble if you should be lazy like me and roll your down the drive instead of driving it., then you press the brake to find that nothing happens and it takes a few milliseconds for that to register, hopefully before you roll one of your cars into another! :o

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