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Les Henson
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I bought a couple of super bling screen washer pumps for catflap today and as they don't have the wattage on them or the packet I thought I'd best ask on a forum of immensly intelligent technical Land Rover egg-heads what fuse I should use for the pair if they are wired in series. Unfortunately I lost the url for that particular forum, so I'm bunging it on here instead :P

Anyone got any idea pleeeeeeeez? :D

Sorry about the carp joke.

Les. :)

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I bought a couple of super bling screen washer pumps for catflap today and as they don't have the wattage on them or the packet I thought I'd best ask on a forum of immensly intelligent technical Land Rover egg-heads what fuse I should use for the pair if they are wired in series. Unfortunately I lost the url for that particular forum, so I'm bunging it on here instead :P

Anyone got any idea pleeeeeeeez? :D

Sorry about the carp joke.

Les. :)

Why are you connecting them in series? That will only deliver 6v or so to each pump.

I wouldn't imagine they will draw more than 2 or 3 A each - so I would go with a 10 A fuse assuming you meant to say "parallel". If you do genuinly mean series then if they say draw 2.5A @ 12v, they will draw 1.25A total.

Si

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well, totally relient on no multimeters or anything, just a blade fuse holder, what you could do is wire the two up in parallel, fit a 1A fuse and switch it on, if it blows, fit a 2A, followed by 3A, 5A, 7.5A, 10A and if you get that far your into burning stuff territory.

Alternatively, if you got a multimeter capable of 10A, stick it "in-line" with the two items, set to 10A monitor, make sure you got the leads in the correct MM sockets, and see what current gets drawn. Add 25% and that'll do cushdy

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I bought a couple of super bling screen washer pumps for catflap today and as they don't have the wattage on them or the packet I thought I'd best ask on a forum of immensly intelligent technical Land Rover egg-heads what fuse I should use for the pair if they are wired in series. Unfortunately I lost the url for that particular forum, so I'm bunging it on here instead :P

Anyone got any idea pleeeeeeeez? :D

Sorry about the carp joke.

Les. :)

this might help my 110 has a 5amp fuse for the rear washer & a 12amp for the front wash, that fuse also powers the reverse lights.

see you do get sensible answers :D

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I bought a couple of super bling screen washer pumps for catflap today and as they don't have the wattage on them or the packet I thought I'd best ask on a forum of immensly intelligent technical Land Rover egg-heads what fuse I should use for the pair if they are wired in series. Unfortunately I lost the url for that particular forum, so I'm bunging it on here instead :P

Anyone got any idea pleeeeeeeez? :D

Sorry about the carp joke.

Les. :)

Rght Les! if you'd posted on LRA you'd have your answer by now! :angry:

First, unless catflap has a 24v system, or you've managed to get 6v pumps ( how? why?), don't wire them in series.

Fuses are there to protect your wiring ( stop it catching fire!), not the actual pump, so it doesn't matter that much what current the pump draws, as long as it's more than the fuse.

You need to make sure that your wire and switch have a higher rating than the fuse - e.g. 15 amp switch and wire, 10 amp (continous) fuse. If more current goes down the wires than the pump should use, then that's either caused by an already faulty pump, or by a short circuit through the wire insulation or connections to switch or wire.

If you have a multi meter, use the ammeter option to measure current through a single pump ( whilst pumping water, not dry - this will use more power) - double it for runnign two pumps and add at least 1/2 again for your fuse rating - double again would be best. Then up the rating on your wire and switch another 50%.

If your not sure about using the ammeter it will probably use the same ground (black) connection as when your doing volts, dwell etc, but there will be a another socket you need to use for the red wire (it may have something like "10A max" written next to it, like this).

MM010910445C.jpg

Use the meter wires in series with the pump i.e. making the connection between one of the pump connectors and your battery.

I doubt a washer will need more than 10A, but if you see the reading go over 10 or read ------ or another warning message, disconnect straight away!

Don't try this on a starter motor!

After you've finished measuring the current remember to move the red wire back to the normal socket before trying to check any voltages.

Iain

p.s. pics from machine mart - thanks www.machinemart.co.uk - It's a very good meter, I've had one for years, and it works very well!

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