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Different tyre treads on same axle??


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How bad is it to have tyres of different treads on the same axle of a defender??

Several of our work vehicles (mostly used on road) have mixed tyres, with mixes such as SAT (or similar) on one wheel and a standard mud terrain on the other...

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The main issue would be a likely increase in your laundry bill if you need to do an emergency stop (especially on a wet road) due to the different braking characteristics of different tyres. You would be quite likely to disappear off to the left or right depending on which one grips better!

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This is being over-thought. The reason that it isn't illegal is that it makes very little difference. The only time that it makes any difference at all is in the microsecond between the tyre starting to lose grip, and it actually locking up. Brakes aren't balanced that perfectly anyway, and they would make much more difference. Add to that the huge lever arm that the rest of the vehicle (front to back which is anchored to the road by the other pair of wheels) creates, and there is no descernable difference between similar different patterns. There might be a difference between a slick and a mud tyre, but in general terms, no. Regarding the difference to the drivetrain wear, much more difference would be caused by only going around roundabouts one way - ie. no noticable difference.

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My understanding is that it it illegal to mix radial and crossply on the same axle but the tread pattern is not relevant only the method of manufacture. It might not be a particularly good idea but I don't think it's illegal

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My understanding is that it it illegal to mix radial and crossply on the same axle but the tread pattern is not relevant only the method of manufacture.

Correct - you can't mix crossply and radial on the same axle (although you can mix them on the same vehicle) similarly, you can't mix tyre sizes. Tread pattern makes little difference.

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Correct - you can't mix crossply and radial on the same axle (although you can mix them on the same vehicle) similarly, you can't mix tyre sizes. Tread pattern makes little difference.

yay I got something right for a change :)

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Correct - you can't mix crossply and radial on the same axle (although you can mix them on the same vehicle) similarly, you can't mix tyre sizes. Tread pattern makes little difference.

If thats still the case in the UK good.

But certainly for France, Germany & Italy - you must have tyre of the same manufactuer & type on the axel.

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This is being over-thought. The reason that it isn't illegal is that it makes very little difference. The only time that it makes any difference at all is in the microsecond between the tyre starting to lose grip, and it actually locking up. Brakes aren't balanced that perfectly anyway, and they would make much more difference. Add to that the huge lever arm that the rest of the vehicle (front to back which is anchored to the road by the other pair of wheels) creates, and there is no descernable difference between similar different patterns. There might be a difference between a slick and a mud tyre, but in general terms, no. Regarding the difference to the drivetrain wear, much more difference would be caused by only going around roundabouts one way - ie. no noticable difference.

i.e. the microsecond between having a crash and not having a crash :)

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