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Grease is the word...


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Hi,

I'm in the process of rebuilding my truck (1989 F reg 90 TC with Disco 200Tdi transplant and 1990RRC Axles)

I've stripped all the axles apart and rebuilt all the hubs with new bearings, seals etc etc. All repainted and blingy looking!

Before I refitted the rear hubs I'd ran out of grease so popped along to my local factors for some more. Whilst I was in there, alongside the 'standard' lithium grease, they had some grey stuff with Molybdenum in. The label said it was for CVs and high peformance/load applications but was also excellent for wheel bearings. Plus it was more expensive so I figured it must be better lol!

Naturally I bought it :rolleyes: and rebuilt the hubs with it but now they seem quite hard to move. I haven't overtightened the hub nuts, it's just the drag of the grease. Is this anything to worry about? The only thing that's putting me off is that it says on the tub 'Don't overpack the bearings'. What does this mean?! Of course, I've packed the bearings by brushing grese onto em and speinning em by hand to make sure it's all got in there. Is this 'overpacking'?

Everything is new so will it ease up as they start working? Or am I best to take them all apart, clean them and use the cheap stuff?

And finally, why can't it ever be easy?! :lol:

TYIA

Simon

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If you have over packed the bearings the centifrugal force will force out the majority of the grease past the seals.

However, if you seriously over packed the bearings you risk causing damage.

Are the two greases compatible? Is it possible they may react with each other.

As far as i remember Molybdenum is a fantastic conductor for magnetism. Just a bit of trivia for you.

But i have used it in the past for rebuilding C.V. joints and it was fine.

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Molybdenium Disulphide grease is cv grease (dark grey and failry runny in comparison to LM/HM grease)

JCB blue grease is the best that I've come across for bearings - it's very sticky and designed to work in very harsh environments. A bearing cavity should never be fully packed with grease - I would go no further than 2/3 full.

Les.

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Hi,

I'm in the process of rebuilding my truck (1989 F reg 90 TC with Disco 200Tdi transplant and 1990RRC Axles)

I've stripped all the axles apart and rebuilt all the hubs with new bearings, seals etc etc. All repainted and blingy looking!

Before I refitted the rear hubs I'd ran out of grease so popped along to my local factors for some more. Whilst I was in there, alongside the 'standard' lithium grease, they had some grey stuff with Molybdenum in. The label said it was for CVs and high peformance/load applications but was also excellent for wheel bearings. Plus it was more expensive so I figured it must be better lol!

Naturally I bought it :rolleyes: and rebuilt the hubs with it but now they seem quite hard to move. I haven't overtightened the hub nuts, it's just the drag of the grease. Is this anything to worry about? The only thing that's putting me off is that it says on the tub 'Don't overpack the bearings'. What does this mean?! Of course, I've packed the bearings by brushing grese onto em and speinning em by hand to make sure it's all got in there. Is this 'overpacking'?

Everything is new so will it ease up as they start working? Or am I best to take them all apart, clean them and use the cheap stuff?

And finally, why can't it ever be easy?! :lol:

TYIA

Simon

I had the same thoughts as you did when it came to grease. Used the moly grease for CV joints on the wheel bearings having the belief it would be a better grease for them. However, as time went by the grease got very liquidy, so much so that it seeped past the oil seals and only the brake disc! :( DOH!! I only noticed because she would pull to one side under braking. The workshop manual recommends Castrol LM as one of the bearing greases IIRC, ive stuck to that and it seems ok. I think i read somewhere that Moly grease is only designed for 'sliding' applications such as CV joints, gearbox input shaft to clutch plate spline etc, and not for 'rotational' applications i.e. wheel bearings. Thats my 2p

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