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Urgent brake shoe help required


Ryan
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Can anyone tell me if my brake shoes are the the correct way around. I thought I got it right the other day, but I have loads of travel in the brake pedal and the adjusters don't seem to what to do anything.

Below is the picture of the passenger side:

gallery_1731_595_25501.jpg

The rear most shoe has the bigger space after friction material at the top:

gallery_1731_595_32180.jpg

The adjuster on the front most shoe hardly even tickles the adjuster pin thing.

Help please 'cos it's getting dark out and I need the Defender for work at 6.30am tomorrow!

Edited to add: I have notice that the adjuster pin thing is closer to the friction material on the front most pad than the one on the rearmost, if that makes a difference...

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I have just whipped the driver's side drum off and the configuration is the complete opposite - the front-most shoe has most of the friction material at the bottom and the rear-most shoe has most of the friction material at the top.

Help...!

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Wish I could help, my only guess by dumb reasoning is you've got them upside-down, as the bit with no friction material should (if my logic is correct) go at the fixed end, not the cylinder end, as that bit will never be pushed out to contact the drum, whereas the other (cylinder) end will be. Assuming there's a fixed end on there and not two cylinders :unsure:

Or have I just confused the whole thing totally? :ph34r:

If you get really peed off, call me and I'll bring the spanners and hob-nobs.

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I have just whipped the driver's side drum off and the configuration is the complete opposite - the front-most shoe has most of the friction material at the bottom and the rear-most shoe has most of the friction material at the top.

Help...!

check the silver coloured blip/peg is locating with and adjusting with the adjusters. It looks like the peg is facing outwards on both shoes?

unless it protrudes the same on both sides of the shoe(can't remember).

I got sold 90 shoes which didn't fit at all, so you have the right shoes. Just make sure they have been fitted as two matching pairs e.g 1 of each on each side. Mine were taped together as 2 pairs. The pegs for the adjusters are the best clue I can give without seeing the job. Also make sure you have bled the rear brakes once done if the pedal is spongy. Only do this when you have the brakes back together though obviously. :rolleyes:

I took the opportunity to change my brake cylinders while I was at it as I had a leaking seal.

Pete

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Guest otchie1
I have just whipped the driver's side drum off and the configuration is the complete opposite - the front-most shoe has most of the friction material at the bottom and the rear-most shoe has most of the friction material at the top.

Help...!

Front & back aren't really important but leading shoe and trailing shoe are.

passenger side

friction material at top left and bottom right

driver side

friction material at top right and bottom left

Also, leading shoe friction material thickness may be thicker than trailling shoe.

HTH

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Is the 110 ex-utility or 'heavy duty' Ryan? Some drum braked 110s were fitted with slightly different rear brakes which are not compatible with 'standard' shoes. SimonR had this issue with his old (1986) 110 years ago, new shoes, apparently adjusted but very long peddle travel and no effective rear brakes. Once the correct brake shoes were fitted (Dunsfold Landrovers?) the brakes worked just fine. Needless to say, longer term a disc conversion is the solution to the fast wear rate when used off-road.

Cheers

Chris

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Unfortunately the advice came too late - I had to get out there and do something, or at least bodge it...

Wish I could help, my only guess by dumb reasoning is you've got them upside-down, as the bit with no friction material should (if my logic is correct) go at the fixed end, not the cylinder end, as that bit will never be pushed out to contact the drum, whereas the other (cylinder) end will be. Assuming there's a fixed end on there and not two cylinders :unsure:

Or have I just confused the whole thing totally? :ph34r:

If you get really peed off, call me and I'll bring the spanners and hob-nobs.

Cheers JU, there is only one way up as the cylinder ends and pivot ends are different.

check the silver coloured blip/peg is locating with and adjusting with the adjusters. It looks like the peg is facing outwards on both shoes?

unless it protrudes the same on both sides of the shoe(can't remember).

I got sold 90 shoes which didn't fit at all, so you have the right shoes. Just make sure they have been fitted as two matching pairs e.g 1 of each on each side. Mine were taped together as 2 pairs. The pegs for the adjusters are the best clue I can give without seeing the job. Also make sure you have bled the rear brakes once done if the pedal is spongy. Only do this when you have the brakes back together though obviously. :rolleyes:

I took the opportunity to change my brake cylinders while I was at it as I had a leaking seal.

Pete

Cheers Pete - the silver peg goes right through, I'd assume so they don't have to manufacture 4 separate shoes for each part number. The peg is closer to the friction material on one shoe per side which indicates that the adjusters are in slightly different positions. This means that the shoe with the peg that is closest to the hub has to go at the front, otherwise the adjuster doesn't come close.

Front & back aren't really important but leading shoe and trailing shoe are.

passenger side

friction material at top left and bottom right

driver side

friction material at top right and bottom left

Also, leading shoe friction material thickness may be thicker than trailling shoe.

In the end I removed the passenger side, after sticking my thumb nail through my thumb through liberal use of a screwdriver :angry: , swapped them around and reattached. It is now adjusting as it should. This means that the friction material is completely the opposite way around as per otchie1's post...go figure <_<

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Guest otchie1
In the end I removed the passenger side, after sticking my thumb nail through my thumb through liberal use of a screwdriver :angry: , swapped them around and reattached. It is now adjusting as it should. This means that the friction material is completely the opposite way around as per otchie1's post...go figure <_<

If it works then leave it but it's 'wrong'. Drums utilise self-wrapping and only the actuating edge of the shoe actually touches the drum - hence the long strip with no friction material on it 'cos it would never do anything. If the shoes are on nsr/osr reversed then you'll still stop but slightly less efficiently and never notice.

Of course, manufacturing reality is that it's cheaper to have just two unique shoes to make rather than four and to just put up with the supposed imperfection of using them on both sides so your shoes might be identical on both sides.

As it's only rear brakes I wouldn't worry too much about it - I was 6 months without any at the back end before now :rolleyes:

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The friction material should be at the top towards the front of the vehicle and on the bottom towards the rear, so that the material 'bites' into the drum when the wheel turns in a forward direction. An axle set of shoes comprises two pairs and are not 'handed' with regard to which side of the vehicle they go.

Les.

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  • 1 month later...

Sorry to resurrect this old chestnut, but I missed Chris G8MUD's reply on this thread. I was checking out Microcat last night and noticed the two different types of brake shoes - one not-so-heavy dty and one heavy duty.

Now, Microcat appears to show that apart from the shoes, all of the other components - drum, back plate, etc - are the same whether HD or not. Can someone tell me what the difference is in the shoes? Any pictures? I've got a set of what ever I didn't buy before (can't find the invoice so don't know what part number I had <_< ) on order and they should be in by tomorrow...but it would be nice to know what the actual difference is.

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standard 110 drum brake shoes should be RTC3418

HD are STC359 for rear axle 24S suffix B Defender110 over 3050kg & all Defender 130.

Thanks Ralph, but what's the physical difference? Are there bits in different places? Or is it a compound thing? I'd have to check re the axle suffix number - where is the serial stamped? Mine would fall into the "Defender 110 over 3050kg" category according to the vin plate and the MOT man (class 7).

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Just had a call from my local independent - the HD shoes are only available (at the moment) from Land Rover at about £140 a set :o - good job I was sitting down. Providing the current shoes actually carry on working, I think I'll hang on for a disk axle to swap for the current drum axle.

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Thanks Ralph, but what's the physical difference? Are there bits in different places? Or is it a compound thing? I'd have to check re the axle suffix number - where is the serial stamped? Mine would fall into the "Defender 110 over 3050kg" category according to the vin plate and the MOT man (class 7).

Sorry, don't know what if any difference between the 2 sets.

rear axle number is stamped into the rear face just above the horizontal weld line on the longest axle tube [right hand tube looking from rear] get your wire brush out.

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Just a long shot,

but if the brakes are working ok with the shoes fitted 'the wrong way round', is it possible that the axle has been stripped at some point and the left hand brake back plate put on the right hand end and vice versa? Assuming they are handed of course.

Regards,

Diff

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Just a long shot,

but if the brakes are working ok with the shoes fitted 'the wrong way round', is it possible that the axle has been stripped at some point and the left hand brake back plate put on the right hand end and vice versa? Assuming they are handed of course.

Regards,

Diff

It is possible. I know I haven't stripped anything, and I don't think Pux (previous owner) did. Possible the owner before that. Going by the fairly useless images on microcat, there does't appear to be anything where the plate mounts to the axle to suggest they are handed, so I suppose if the whole lot was stripped down (instead of one side at a time) and the plates were confused, it is entirely possible they went back on the wrong way around.

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  • 9 years later...

Just to clarify this situation as many current model shoes have the friction material evenly spaced on both the leading and trailing shoes.  The picture attached is some brand new Mintex shoes.  Note the friction material ends at the same place.  What you need to look for is the distance between the spring hole and the adjustment pin.  The distance is longer on the leading shoe and closer on the trailing shoe.  It is very obvious to spot once you know this tidbit.  The spring holes are always in the same location.  The adjusting pins are in different ones.  The adjuster will not work when placed in the wrong location.

leadtrail.jpg

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