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6 Inch Lift And Leaning A lot


benbenukuk
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What is the actual relevance of a 6" lift...? Are you running huge rubber....?

We lifted a friends 110 6" just for a day to get 40" rubber underneath just on the standard axles.... Can you not give a body lift for some of the clearance you require, portals or anything along these lines....

What's the spec of your rangie......???

post-4890-1219175995_thumb.jpg

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What is the actual relevance of a 6" lift...? Are you running huge rubber....?

We lifted a friends 110 6" just for a day to get 40" rubber underneath just on the standard axles.... Can you not give a body lift for some of the clearance you require, portals or anything along these lines....

What's the spec of your rangie......???

post-4890-1219175995_thumb.jpg

The main reason is the 35/12.50R15 BFG Muds but I find it also helps with keeping the water out due to the extra few inches, This is the breakdown of the lift +2 inch spring +2 inch spring spacers and a +2 inch body lift, Ben

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^^^

What they have all said, 6" lift will make it handle on the road like a drunk piggy on roller skates,you do not need anywhere near that much lift for 35" tyres. On my 90 as a contrast I have NO lift 34" tyres and +5 shocks all around, even then with soft springs the handling is "Interesting".

Reduce the lift and it won't wallow about so much

Nige

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The main reason is the 35/12.50R15 BFG Muds but I find it also helps with keeping the water out due to the extra few inches, This is the breakdown of the lift +2 inch spring +2 inch spring spacers and a +2 inch body lift, Ben

I would at least start by getting rid of the spacers, you must have plenty of clearance for the arches.... If not can you trim the arches and fit bigger bump stops.... Fitting longer shocks will give you extra droop to compensate. What radius arms and trailling arms etc are you running.... Got any pictures...?

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I would at least start by getting rid of the spacers, you must have plenty of clearance for the arches.... If not can you trim the arches and fit bigger bump stops.... Fitting longer shocks will give you extra droop to compensate. What radius arms and trailling arms etc are you running.... Got any pictures...?

The radius arms, Trailling arms panhard rod etc are std, will this make a difference? here are some pics, cheers. Ben

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100_0789.jpg

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100_0688.jpg

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Fitting longer shocks will give you extra droop to compensate.

But you can conside the springs to act as a fulcrum, the wheels are outside the springs, so if the springs remain the same but longer dampers are fitted then as the wheel on one side drops further, the wheel on the opposite side will move up closer to the wheel arch. The more you extend the dampers, then the more you will have to extend the bumpstops if you don't want the wheels to raise any further up on articulation.

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I'm running a similar lift on my Discovery, but it looks a darn sight higher than your rangie. However I'm running 37" tyres and only getting very slight rubbing at full stuff. By that rationel you should be able to come down 1" on the lift and get no rubbing.

The suspension lift doesn't give you more wheel clearance because it doesn't stop up travel. You could add +2" bump stops and reduce the lift by probably 2" and still have clearance.

The main thing is you need to decide what you want. My Discovery rolls like hell off road and occaissionaly falls over, but that's the balance I have for running 37" tyres (and more importantly the lift to accomodate them) that will get me through ruts and mud far better than smaller tyres. Like all things 4x4 you make you choice and you live with the compromise :lol:

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Maby the best thing would be for a cage?

Maybe the best thing would be to not roll it :ph34r:

As Nige said, it's all a compromise - you can't have soft flexy suspension and rock solid handling, you can't have big lift and keep a low CoG. You can, however, come to some calculated compromises with a bit of thought. With a bit of effort you can come to some very good compromises.

I'd ditch the body lift, IMHO they're the least useful sort of lift. The higher your seat is, the worse side angles will feel.

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Maby the best thing would be for a cage?

My Disco's got a cage, doesn't stop it falling over though, in fact it makes it fall over more often as I don't worry so much :(

I disagree with Fridge though (for about the first time ever) as the body lift doen't raise the CoG as much as the same height suspension lift. I think you'd be better of ditching the spring spacers and keep the body lift and therefore lower it 2".

Oh, and drive with caution on side slopes :ph34r:

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I disagree with Fridge though (for about the first time ever) as the body lift doen't raise the CoG as much as the same height suspension lift. I think you'd be better of ditching the spring spacers and keep the body lift and therefore lower it 2".

That's the reason I went for a 2" body lift instead of 2" spacers because you raise the body away from the wheels but the suspension isn't higher so it shouldn't wallow as much.

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  • 2 weeks later...
this was used in the 70-80s i think on a defender...

no comprimise suspension from the aussies

http://www.kinetic.au.com/x.html

i want to make it for my rangiebob

Firstly I would always consider cost as a compromise

Secondly I spent a while mulling over a full dydraulic setup and cross linkinking it. One potential problem with a passive system like that is on a very steep climb were the vehicle is at a bit of an angle so the most of the weight is acting on one rear corner. The senario I envisage is that without some stiffness the loaded wheel could completely compress and the opposite unloded wheel just lift off the ground causing the whole vehicle to pitch backwards. If that setup was combined with very long travel suspension, minimum stiffness and no form of lock out then I can see leading to some brown trouser situations.

Another other point to bear in mind it that maintianing equal weight on all 4 tyres will only give you the same traction benefit as a locked diff if the ground under all 4 tyres is the same. If 3 tyres are on good firm dry ground and another is in sloppy mud then without some form traction aid such as locked/limited slip diffs or ETC then you still won't generate much traction.

As suspension systems go a cross linked hydraulic system has a lot to offer over more coventional systems, but its still has its disadvantages.

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on the kinetic system if the rear right wheel is compressed then so is the left front...

this is where the system gets its stability on and off road and that is why is also has such articulation... if you study the pipe layout and the rest of the website you will se what i mean...

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on the kinetic system if the rear right wheel is compressed then so is the left front...

By that logic the moment the center of cravity acting sufficiently towards one corner of the vehicle (hence my example above) then it just fully compress that corner whilst lifitng the opposite tyre off the ground. This can in turn cause the center of gravity to move further from the center of the veichle (assuming the CofG is above the roll axis) making it less stable and more likely to roll over.

this is where the system gets its stability on and off road and that is why is also has such articulation... if you study the pipe layout and the rest of the website you will se what i mean...

I have studied that website several times in the past and assuming that picture is an acurate representaion of reality then there are several features to note.

The Hyrdraulic rams look like typical hydraulic rams were the piston haa different cross section on each isde due to the rod. This cause more fluid to be displaced from one side than the other. When the picture system is compressed the fluid has to go somewhere (basic principle of hydraulics that the fluid can't be compressed) and this is happening on both rams in the circuit such that the fluid from one can't be displaced into the other.

The second feature to note is connected into each line near the top of each hydraulic ram is what looks to be an accumulator. As the system ids compressed the excess fluid squeesed out of the rams moves into these accumulators. The accumulators are like springs, as the oil moves into the accumulators it compressed the gas inside the accumulator. These accumulators provide the basic sprung suspension at each corner of the vehicel as well as the roll stiff ness across oppoiste corners.

If relativerly soft accumulators were used then it would have a similare effect to fitting soft coil springs in the example in my post above.

PS. I do applogise if nobody can understand what I'm trying to say. Like a stereo typical engineer, communication is what I struggle with most.

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o right... now i understand why the accumulators are there :D thanks

and if you are going up a hill at 90 degree angle like you are taught to for atvs tha rear suspension would compress which on the kinetic system would lower the front suspension and fill the accumulators with hydro oil at the same time lowering the CoG making the vehicle hug the hill as it climbs

correct me if im wrong

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