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what can i do about aliminium corrosion


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Ive been fretting over how to fix the aliminium thats been turining into dust on me bodywork. The most worrying parts are on the rear body. The main parts being where the fixings connect from the chassis to the body. The only thing I can think of is cut it off and stick a new bit on as a patch. Anyone know if i can weld aliminium with a single phase gas mig welder, can i just buy aliminium wire or is it impossible?

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aluminium is a good thing, and actually protects itsself,

when aluminium reacts with water, it creates white power, aluminium oxide which actually forms a protective coating over the good aluminium, so if i were you, id just leave it. or paint it.

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Ive been fretting over how to fix the aliminium thats been turining into dust on me bodywork. The most worrying parts are on the rear body. The main parts being where the fixings connect from the chassis to the body. The only thing I can think of is cut it off and stick a new bit on as a patch. Anyone know if i can weld aliminium with a single phase gas mig welder, can i just buy aliminium wire or is it impossible?

Frost.co.uk do a kit for welding ally and it's easy.

http://www.frost.co.uk/productList.asp?cat...rostCat=Welding

item W150

All you need is a butain blow lamp (blow torch) . I've welded all sorts with it and it's a good strong weld, follow the instructions and be patient and you WILL make a good job. There is enough in the kit to weld quite a bit so it's relatively cheap.

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aluminium is a good thing, and actually protects itsself,

when aluminium reacts with water, it creates white power, aluminium oxide which actually forms a protective coating over the good aluminium, so if i were you, id just leave it. or paint it.

Not true for galvanic corrosion. I have seen Rover panels that were completely rotted off from where they were touching the steel.

Replace the corroded spots, and put rubber or something to limit contact between the different metals.

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You can mig aluminium. I've done it.

The name of the game with galvanic corrosion is isolation. you need to keep disimilar metals seperate. there are plenty of products out there to do this, from rubber/nylon/etc washers and sleeves, to isolating jointing compounds, as used on industrial structures, and aero-nautical stuff, i believe.

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To weld LR alloy with a mig I use a 1mm nozzle (for gasless) as the alloy apparently expands rapidly and may jam a 0.8mm one. Some people recommend a teflon torch tube liner but I was too mean to buy one and found that my ordinary one seems OK. You will need argon gas - NOT a mix with anything else - and as you know the cheap small cylinders always seem to leak from their co-called regulators.

A stainless steel wire brush is recommended for cleaning (I got one - not sure it made any difference).

The welding is not easy - as you can't see what is happening very well - as it doesn't glow red - and the metal tends to sag and drop. Some people recommend using heat sinks like lumps of brass to help.

With some practice you'll produce a reasonable job but don't think you'll be able to do beautiful butt welds after a couple of minutes.

You could think about countersunk pop type rivets. There are some which are supposed to be nearly invisible as made by Cherrymax - generally an aerospace product.

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The welding is not easy - as you can't see what is happening very well - as it doesn't glow red - and the metal tends to sag and drop. Some people recommend using heat sinks like lumps of brass to help.

With some practice you'll produce a reasonable job but don't think you'll be able to do beautiful butt welds after a couple of minutes..

I think you should try the 'Frost' welding rods as mentioned earlier further up. I have made professional welds with them and it is easy. The weld is very strong and you can easily see the weld metal flowing into the job, ideal for filling in missing bits of bodywork or welding ally brackets on.

You can even repair broken bellhousings and manifolds with them.

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I think you should try the 'Frost' welding rods as mentioned earlier further up. I have made professional welds with them and it is easy. The weld is very strong and you can easily see the weld metal flowing into the job, ideal for filling in missing bits of bodywork or welding ally brackets on.

You can even repair broken bellhousings and manifolds with them.

I had a look at the frost rods and I think thats the way to go. Ive only got about four hours welding experience so Im sorta learning as I go (arent we all). I read that you can tell when aliminium is at the correct temperaturre if you spray oil or lubricant on the area, when it evaporates you know the aliminium is ready to weld. If it burns then the temp is too high.

Im probably preaching to the choir here though on that titbit of advice :rolleyes: .

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I had a look at the frost rods and I think thats the way to go. Ive only got about four hours welding experience so Im sorta learning as I go (arent we all). I read that you can tell when aliminium is at the correct temperaturre if you spray oil or lubricant on the area, when it evaporates you know the aliminium is ready to weld. If it burns then the temp is too high.

Im probably preaching to the choir here though on that titbit of advice :rolleyes: .

Those rods will melt on the heated ally repair patch or whatever when the temp is right and not before so you just keep the rod out of the flame and when it melts on to hot workpiece you are ready. Easy :)

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