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How to clean big bits of engine


FridgeFreezer

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Maybe jumping the gun a bit but I'm thinking about building the engine up for the 109.

The main thing I need to do is get things like heads cleaned, as they've been in a dusty workshop for too long. I have a mate who can sand blast and acid dip things, but I don't really want to have to keep asking him to cart bits of engine to his works and back if I can do a decent job at home.

Unfortunately I don't have a dishwasher available - no mains water at the workshop and my dishwasher isn't big enough.

So, any suggestions?

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Ah kay, first thing, DON'T SAND BLAST ENGINE PARTS, ok, now that's out the way, the reason.

Because the engine parts are castings and alloy, the beads of grit get lightly impregnated into the castings, and when you run the engine the luvly clensing oil removes the bits from the inside of the casings, takes them for a jolly ride around your engine and swiftly destroys your bearings, camshafts et cetera.

If you don't mind spending a bit of time and lugging the bits home, certain anti-rust stuff like Jenolite (liquid stuff, not the jelly) does wonders for aluminium castings. My boss has a tub of the stuff, drops his engine bits into it, leaves it for a day or two and then hoses them down. It lifts the crud out of the pours of the alloy and also helps to kill any rust in the ferrous bits

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what stuff do you want to clean? oil/grease/burnt on oil/carbon?

petrol/paraffin/white spirit/gunk and a toothbrush or larger brush will move oil/grease.

For burnt on carbon/grease/oil, oven cleaner will shift most of that (As used in on my v8 sump).

Also caustic soda is supposed to be good for shifting carbon but is not nice on ali (I have not used that). (this is the stuff that dishwashers use)

You will get various degrees of success.

There is nasty degreaser stuff that is meant to be the bees knees, metasoak; comapny in midlands sells this; never got tound to buying and using this stuff.

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Domestic wheelie bin, or Commercial wheelie bin for really big stuff. A packet of washing powder, and a pressure washer. Work out your own soak, wash, rinse cycle(s).

That's for the initial clean of crud that would otherwise come off on your hands, although a good soak in washing powder solution is a good deep clean as well.

The 'Jenolite bath' approach is also excellent, especially for steel parts, but you will have a substantial financial investment tied up in a container big enough to drown a cylinder head in.

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Jenolite is like "Kurust" isn't it? If so I am given to believe that it is just phosphoric acid, the same stuff they put in Coke - and also the same stuff, I understand, that is used to clean milking parlours and equipment. It can be bought cheap in large quantitys from farm suppliers. Large enough amounts to bath a head in anyway.

Chris

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Jenolite is like "Kurust" isn't it? If so I am given to believe that it is just phosphoric acid, the same stuff they put in Coke - and also the same stuff, I understand, that is used to clean milking parlours and equipment. It can be bought cheap in large quantitys from farm suppliers. Large enough amounts to bath a head in anyway.

Chris

Hmm, maybe a few litres of value brand coke from your local supermarket could be a cheap and effective option?

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