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Crankshaft bolt


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I have to change the Timming belt,and first of all I read the manual then I read all the information in the forum about this,and I have seen theat all LR ownwers prefer to take off the crankshaft bolt with the method "briefly flick the ignition"--wich an good friend mechanic does not recomend.I also have a fear about breaking down the bolt...an if it happens so it is BIG problem.

What is your opinion about this method?

Did You also used this method? Did you had some problems?

thanks

P.S. I aslo dont have special tool LRT 12-180

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Make sure the socket is on the bolt nice and square and that the handle of the breaker bar is up against the underside of the chassis. The torque of the starter motor usually (but not always) then undoes the bolt. I've never have a bolt snap using this method.

Don't forget to remove the fuel shut-off solenoid wire.

Les.

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Its really easy to make a tool to do this. You need a strong length of iron about 2ft, so that you can cut out a semi circle at the end which fits around the crank bolt (after the pulley has been removed). You then drill out holes so you can bolt this length to the damper/where the pulley bolted on. Once bolted in place, one end of the bar tucks under the chassis rail - this stops the shaft turning as you undo the crank bolt - you do need a long breaker bar to get it undone though! Easy and quick tool to make - only need an angle grinder and a drill and it will be used time and time again and is useful for doing the bolt up tight as well...............

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I use the correct size socket/long braker bar & my brano winch handle [because it extends] chock all the wheels each side,low range,parkbrake on, in gear & just undo the bolt, yes it's very tight & takes a few tugs but I haven't been beaten by it yet.

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If its manual transmission just put it in 3rd or 4th gear and get someone to hold there foot on the brake, They will then usually come undone. I have had some that are so tight that the clutch slips before the bolt comes undone. In these situations and with most automatics (If there's not room to get the air wrench in) I very often use the flicking the starter method. As long as you have a well fitting socket on the bolt correctly and keep the bar against the chassis there is no problem with this method. Never had a problem doing it and If the bolt does brake it was going to anyway! As les says, Might be an idea to remove the Fuel solenoid lead incase reactions arn't as good as they could be tho I don't usually bother. It usually is just a very quick flick of the key. Sometimes helps if you have an assistant to steady the socket.

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Its really easy to make a tool to do this. You need a strong length of iron about 2ft, so that you can cut out a semi circle at the end which fits around the crank bolt (after the pulley has been removed). You then drill out holes so you can bolt this length to the damper/where the pulley bolted on. Once bolted in place, one end of the bar tucks under the chassis rail - this stops the shaft turning as you undo the crank bolt - you do need a long breaker bar to get it undone though! Easy and quick tool to make - only need an angle grinder and a drill and it will be used time and time again and is useful for doing the bolt up tight as well...............

I just don't anderstand how this home made tool looks..?

you say:"(after the pulley has been removed). "-but how I remove the pulley if first I have to remove the bolt????

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I just don't anderstand how this home made tool looks..?

you say:"(after the pulley has been removed). "-but how I remove the pulley if first I have to remove the bolt????

Its here in this picture. Its 21.5 inches from flat end to point. The circular cut out sits around the head of the crank bolt (one the pulley is removed as Les showed above). Two of the bolts that attach the pulley can then be used to attach the bar to the damper. The pointed end of the bar sits under the chassis rail (drivers side) and above the axle - therefore wedging against one or the other depending on whether or not you're undoing or doing up the bolt. Use a strong bar to construct it - weaker stuff will just bend.

post-12362-1235242747_thumb.jpg

I just looked at the tools out there to do this job and made my own version......

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Its here in this picture. Its 21.5 inches from flat end to point. The circular cut out sits around the head of the crank bolt (one the pulley is removed as Les showed above). Two of the bolts that attach the pulley can then be used to attach the bar to the damper. The pointed end of the bar sits under the chassis rail (drivers side) and above the axle - therefore wedging against one or the other depending on whether or not you're undoing or doing up the bolt. Use a strong bar to construct it - weaker stuff will just bend.

post-12362-1235242747_thumb.jpg

I just looked at the tools out there to do this job and made my own version......

thanks much, and as my car is LH driver I will put this tool under the chasis on passager side.

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  • 1 year later...

Its here in this picture. Its 21.5 inches from flat end to point. The circular cut out sits around the head of the crank bolt (one the pulley is removed as Les showed above). Two of the bolts that attach the pulley can then be used to attach the bar to the damper. The pointed end of the bar sits under the chassis rail (drivers side) and above the axle - therefore wedging against one or the other depending on whether or not you're undoing or doing up the bolt. Use a strong bar to construct it - weaker stuff will just bend.

post-12362-1235242747_thumb.jpg

I just looked at the tools out there to do this job and made my own version......

I'll have to make one of those, wish I'd seen it a few weeks back when I had the timing case of.

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You can also buy a very nice tool to do this pre made from Difflock.com.

I bought one to do a V8 auto crank bolt but can confirm it definately works for a 200tdi engine, never tried it on a 300tdi but if the crank pulley bolts are the same PCD then it should be fine.

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The tool is £72 and although i'm sure it is nicer than the one i made, a bar and twenty minutes with an angle grinder and drill is almost free! It sits nicely under the chassis rail or against the axle tube (protect with a block of wood) to lock itself so you can undo and more importantly tighten up to the correct torque. I just used the some old crank pulley bolts i had from another engine, but if you dont wish to use them, dont use cheap bolts to attach the tool to the crank pulley as i guess they are the weakpoint and may snap.

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"I have seen theat all LR ownwers prefer to take off the crankshaft bolt with the method "briefly flick the ignition"

No they don't!

I have always said that in my opinion it is best to use the correct crankshaft locking tool as not only does it allow you to remove the bolt in a controlled manner but it also allows you to torque the bolt up correctly on reassembly. How do you do that without the tool?

I bought my timing kit & locking tool from Difflock, excellent quality and good value.

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I lock the flywheel through the wading plug hole in the flywheel housing with a big old screwdriver. I wouldn't say that all Land Rover owners use the starter motor method, but a lot do. I've not heard of any injuries or damage as yet, but I guess it's possible.

Les.

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I made a flywheel locking tool using a bit of threaded bar, sharpened to a point (twice actually, I lost the first one). Insert the threaded bar into the wading plug hole and the sharpened point fits onto the flywheel recess. Cheap simple locking tool.....

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