Jump to content

FilterMag


The Badger
 Share

Recommended Posts

Assuming you're talking about a magnet on your oil filter, no reason for it to be anything other than a good thing for your engine. Old PC hard drives yield *very* strong neodynium magnets if you dismantle them, which is the cheapskate option.

If you're talking about the magic magnets you clip on your fuel line, oil line, water pipes, mobile phone, TV, household pets, children with allergies, etc. and magically cure everything from limescale to cancer, then no, they're pure arse gravy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote from site:

"RA Series is engineered for the demanding needs of large dielsel trucks, racing or heavy duty applications. "

Only a typo with the spelling of diesel ii know but i'm a sceptic on this one.

The oil is meant to keep carp in suspension which is why it turns black.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not really worth it, if you are serious about filtration you are better off installing a by-pass filter like the centrifuge on the TD5 to trap everything. Trapping microscopic ferrous particles is fine, but what about the aluminium, soot, etc that combined together really cause wear issues.

The large truck operators I know that go 100,000km on an oil change don't use magnets, they use by-pass filtration with used oil analysis to ascertain condemnation limits and generally soot levels and tbn (total base number) determine when to dump.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not really worth it, if you are serious about filtration you are better off installing a by-pass filter like the centrifuge on the TD5 to trap everything. Trapping microscopic ferrous particles is fine, but what about the aluminium, soot, etc that combined together really cause wear issues.

The large truck operators I know that go 100,000km on an oil change don't use magnets, they use by-pass filtration with used oil analysis to ascertain condemnation limits and generally soot levels and tbn (total base number) determine when to dump.

Unfortunately I don't have facilities to do oil analysis and I suspect that if I did then my poor old engine would be asking for very frequent oil changes :huh: .. Also, having seen the carp that has collected on the various magnetic sump/drain plugs that I have used over the years, I think that it probably is worth a try.

IMHO it can't do any harm and may well do a lot of good, particularly (heh heh) for 'older' engines. My only reservation is whether they will stay in place on a rufty-tufty Land Rover :D

Personally, (being a cheap-skate) this evening I will be mainly extracting magnets from a couple of old PCs (thanks FF) and sticking them on my filter with whatever comes to hand... ;) Hmmm.. I think I'll do it to the Honda too!

Roger

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought a pair of the Filtermags and was amazed at the contents after the first oil change!

30,000km ago I wore out a single cam shaft lobe and despite flushing the engine through three times to remove the metalic particles it would seem that some microscopic particles of steel dust remained inside the engine. The filter mag did exactly what it's designed to do and helped remove them from the system.

I'm not so sure that flat magnets would have such good results as the concaved ones though....the surface area of the flat magnet to the filter would be much less and probably not as effective. (but probably better then having no magent fitted at all!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why not just change the oil more regularly........ :ph34r:

The way I see it, regardless of how often you change the oil, any help you give the filter can only be a good thing. The filter is only a fine bit of mesh at the end of the day, so a magnet that grabs any metallic particles out of the oil, regardless of size, is going to be keeping the filter cleaner for longer. There's also the fact that filters have a bypass valve, so if they're blocked or restricted a proportion of oil will just bypass the element entirely :blink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Personally, (being a cheap-skate) this evening I will be mainly extracting magnets from a couple of old PCs (thanks FF) and sticking them on my filter with whatever comes to hand... ;) Hmmm.. I think I'll do it to the Honda too!

Hopefully, the nail gun is not the nearest thing to hand! ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unfortunately I don't have facilities to do oil analysis and I suspect that if I did then my poor old engine would be asking for very frequent oil changes :huh: .. Also, having seen the carp that has collected on the various magnetic sump/drain plugs that I have used over the years, I think that it probably is worth a try.

IMHO it can't do any harm and may well do a lot of good, particularly (heh heh) for 'older' engines. My only reservation is whether they will stay in place on a rufty-tufty Land Rover :D

Personally, (being a cheap-skate) this evening I will be mainly extracting magnets from a couple of old PCs (thanks FF) and sticking them on my filter with whatever comes to hand... ;) Hmmm.. I think I'll do it to the Honda too!

Roger

Cheap oil analysis

http://forums.lr4x4.com/index.php?showtopi...st=0#entry12773

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not so sure that flat magnets would have such good results as the concaved ones though....the surface area of the flat magnet to the filter would be much less and probably not as effective. (but probably better then having no magnet fitted at all!)

Easy. Use LR tool #1 on the side of the filter and then it is flat!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use ex PC HDD magnets on diffs [curved ones around the drain plug], boxes, sump and oil filter. Free, and can't do any harm. Neodymium magnet from HDDs are usually glued to a plate, and are very brittle so take care removing them from the plate as they must be removed for max magnetism. They're usually curved so I actually used real money to get 10 rectangular ones [£1.20] from eblag. Magnets [fitted vertically: same magnets, same configuration as a filter mag] + duct tape to cover = Heath Robinson filtermag.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As ChrisM says, HDD magnets are often curved but I've also found strip magnets ~5mm wide by ~2mm thick by ~20mm long, removing them is tricky as they are often bonded to something and are very brittle (and when prised off they will make a dive for the nearest ferrous component!). Bigger, older HD's such as those found in (for example) servers found in skips :unsure: yield bigger magnets than domestic versions.

eBlag is good for a variety of shapes & sizes if you can't be bothered. I was dismantling HDD's anyway for some other reason that escapes me now (the platters make good drinks coasters too actually... :ph34r: )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy