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Toylander S1


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Has any ons made one of the toylanders from the plans (easyer to get the plans over to Aus than the whole Kit)

I want to make one for my son Josh . Thinking that as he is 7 months old now i could start it now and i might have it finished by the time he is 3 :rolleyes:

Just want to know how easy or hard it is to do from the plans

Here is the webb site Toylander

Ali

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My mate Tim bought a set of the series I plans and we set about building it from scratch in his house whilst the wife and kids were away on holiday.

Some of the parts he bought direct from Toylander, but the majority we made our selves.... the hardest part being the slightly curved bonnet which is made from aluminium. We used MDF for the main body work which turned out to be a good choice.

You needn't be an expert in wood working but some basic knowledge is required. Having the right tools is important too. Luckily...carpentry doesn't need as many tools as engineers or mechanics.

I saw an article in LRW mag a few years ago where they covered a build of a Toylander using chipboard! The entire project was a bodge from the beginning and I was surprised the author even allowed his name to be put into print. Tim saw the article and wrote into LRW with photos of his build which was absolutly superb compaired to the magazines featured car.

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My mate Tim bought a set of the series I plans and we set about building it from scratch in his house whilst the wife and kids were away on holiday.

Some of the parts he bought direct from Toylander, but the majority we made our selves.... the hardest part being the slightly curved bonnet which is made from aluminium. We used MDF for the main body work which turned out to be a good choice.

You needn't be an expert in wood working but some basic knowledge is required. Having the right tools is important too. Luckily...carpentry doesn't need as many tools as engineers or mechanics.

I saw an article in LRW mag a few years ago where they covered a build of a Toylander using chipboard! The entire project was a bodge from the beginning and I was surprised the author even allowed his name to be put into print. Tim saw the article and wrote into LRW with photos of his build which was absolutly superb compaired to the magazines featured car.

Yeah i was thinking of getting one or two things from them The bonnet being one of them . Plus hinges and other things like that . But depends on how dfficult it is for them to send to Australia. But i have a bit of time to make it . But will be restoring a real S1 at the same time :rolleyes:

Plus i was thinking of making out of Marine Ply as i thought it may be a bit more durable . But is this possible

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I'm no expert on wood working mate but MDF is probably nicer to work with than PLY. When it comes to smooth edges and making profiled panels then the MDF would win hands down.

The PLY can also be used but might need more use of fillers etc to get a good quality finish. Ply tends to splinter when you cut across the grain..MDF doesn't.

I'd say wait for someone who works with wood to come along and give their opinion.

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MDF is great stuff :) and when painted is as durable as needed I would have thought? It might need a little more thought when it comes to strong-points though..

IMHO it is much nicer/easier to work with too, but don't forget the dust suppression and/or face mask - it is bonded with some kind of nasty stuff* which you don't want doing any tomfoolery* in your lungs... :o

Rog

* Everything in the universe can be classified onto 'stuff' and 'tomfoolery'.

  • 'Stuff' is anything that has substance.
    'Tomfoolery' is anything that stuff does....

;)

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I'm no expert on wood working mate but MDF is probably nicer to work with than PLY. When it comes to smooth edges and making profiled panels then the MDF would win hands down.

The PLY can also be used but might need more use of fillers etc to get a good quality finish. Ply tends to splinter when you cut across the grain..MDF doesn't.

I'd say wait for someone who works with wood to come along and give their opinion.

I used to work with MDF/Ply every day before I got into Engineering... I've made some pretty huge models with both.

I's say build your Toylander out of MDF... It works realy easily, doesn't tear or splinter, is very stable and can be filled with car body filler. ;)

You need to seal the raw edges with an MDF primer, but painting on a liquid glue will work just aswell (do a web search for 'West Systems' boat building epoxy) there is a glue over here called 'Gorilla glue' which sticks MDF really well.

If you treat the soft edges, and paint it properly MDF will give you a brilliant finish.

You should wear a mask when machining/ sanding MDF, this is because the particles are very small, and will hang in the air for hours after you've finished working with it, NOT because it is bonded with formaldahide, although some of it used to be (now illegal)

You can buy waterproof MDF (green core) which might be a good choice?

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