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Bleeding brakes!!!


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Been trying to get my brakes to bleed for three days still not got a firm pedal. Its on the 90/range rover build i'm on with.

Calipers x 4 range rover. all shot blasted and overhauled, pistons all free

All new pipes, dual circuit plummed into T at swivel and then single pipe to Braided goodridge hoses to new pipe to master cylinder. All new at the rear, braided hoses, new pipe to 1983 90 distribution valve front outlet and then out of the side of the distribution valve to the primary outlet on master cylinder.

Replaced all seals in master cylinder today.

Been using a power bleeder aswell as good old fashioned wife pushing pedal.

Pedal movement goes to half way mark and can feel the primary circuit kicking in and pedal then goes hard. Pump the pedal three times and it goes hard about a third of the way (normal feeling pedal) a few seconds later and its down again.

Servo working makes things worse. Pedal really goes down.

I'm at a loss now, can't think of anything else to do. I've still got the pressure reducing valve from the range rover. Sould i replace the distribution valve with this?

Help please, its going to DVLA on monday and needs to have brakes for inspection.

Cheers

Max

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you have to do it in a certian order,

im not exactly sure but i have a feeling that it is

first: passenger side rear brake

second: driver side rear

third:passenger side front

last: driver side front

mikey

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Use a vacuum bleeder, so much better than anything else I have used. The trade use them, so if a mechanic saves time and gets a better job single handed, then it must be right..............

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old fashion and a little 'out there' i know but you could always try back bleeding them.

oil can and a piece of piping to fit over (tightly) the oil can nozzle and the brake nipple, and as stated before start l/h/r and pump brake fluid back upto the m/c tighten nipple and repeat process for other wheel stations, never come across a rover where i have needed to use this method but may help if you are struggling. use it on the 4ton dafs -the clutch system is a b*&ch to bleed and its the only method that works without the relavent sized pressure bleeder.

i would offer a hand but as your nearly the countries lenght away maybe there's someone on 'ere a little closer to you who would do the same if your struggling.

if you hold applied pressure does the pedal creep down?? would suggest seal failure in the m/c or possibly 1 of the calipers but if not then try tightening/checking all your connections you maybe sucking in air when you lift off the pedal.

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how about gravity bleeding- attached tubes to all nipples-into jam jars, open the nipples and have a cup of tea whilst occasionally topping up reservoir, and tapping the calipers, took me about 1 hr last week to flush through and requires only one person and no special kit- the reservoir is so much higher than the nipples that there is a good head of pressure.

your problem sounds more like a master cylinder seal tho.

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Hi, thanks for all the replies. I've now flushed 5 litres of fluid through the system whilst bleeding them. I've replaced the seals in the master cylinder also. There are no leaks. I cannot get the back brakes to work at all although fluid pumps from the bleed nipples on the rear callipers when bleeding. The pedal travels down to the secondary circuit plunger and then gets a good hard pedal. if you pump the pedal twice then a hard pedal occurs before it gets to the secondary circuit. I've been using the correct methods of bleeding in the correct order (furthest from reservoir first)

I can't see it being the master cylinder as the pedal doesn't creep down under constant pressure. I've replaced the 90 distribution valve for the range rover pressure reduction valve.

It has to be air somewhere.

If fluid is leaking out of the nipple threads when bleeding will this affect the bleeding process? This is all that i can think of now. I might try the back bleeding method. I've been using a pressure bleeder that pumps fluid into the reservoir and pushes it through the pipes. Its costing me a bloody fortune in fluid, onto my second five litre tin now.

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Hi, thanks for all the replies. I've now flushed 5 litres of fluid through the system whilst bleeding them. I've replaced the seals in the master cylinder also. There are no leaks. I cannot get the back brakes to work at all although fluid pumps from the bleed nipples on the rear callipers when bleeding. The pedal travels down to the secondary circuit plunger and then gets a good hard pedal. if you pump the pedal twice then a hard pedal occurs before it gets to the secondary circuit. I've been using the correct methods of bleeding in the correct order (furthest from reservoir first)

I can't see it being the master cylinder as the pedal doesn't creep down under constant pressure. I've replaced the 90 distribution valve for the range rover pressure reduction valve.

It has to be air somewhere.

If fluid is leaking out of the nipple threads when bleeding will this affect the bleeding process? This is all that i can think of now. I might try the back bleeding method. I've been using a pressure bleeder that pumps fluid into the reservoir and pushes it through the pipes. Its costing me a bloody fortune in fluid, onto my second five litre tin now.

Forget assistant pushing the pedal whilst you catch the fluid with a cup, forget the pressure in the reservoir types, forget gravity and get one of these:

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Sealey-Tools-VS020

Link does not work but plenty of Sealey brake bleeder kits on the old ebaySorry cannot do a clicky

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Had a similar problem on the rangie (but near side front), almost spent £100 on a professional Gunson Vacuum unit until the guy in the shop recommended the Gunson Easibleed at £18.

I'll admit I was sceptical but five minutes after getting home the problem was sorted. :i-m_so_happy:

HTH's

Mick.

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I use a one way valve & a bit of clear tubing, always worked for me.

i think if the fliud is also coming out around the threads then air will leak back into the system once your foot is off the brake pedal -if using a one way valve. with gravity method or pressure bleeding it shouldn't matter if leaks around thread. is there a different way to bleed the master cylinder- but youve probably done this after replacing seals.

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Only a thought, are you sure your sequence correct? Your post says you are doing farthest from reservoir first, but the attachment from Ralph states to do the "front caliper, drivers side first".

Regards,

Dave.

In one book I read Heynes... :unsure: , it says, " Bleed Back Left, Back Right Front Right and finally Front Left" , in that sequence but in my case I fixed the caliper wrong :blink::blink::blink: . I found this out after the first drive.. no car was involved. The car mentioned is a defender 99 model 110 ;)

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if you can beg/borrow/buy a flexi brake hose clamp or even 2 , clamp the front hoses & bleed the rear brakes, once air free fluid issues from the bleed screw, tighten, then move to one of the front brakes, do each in turn, the check operation with clamps removed. don't know what else to suggest.

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if you can beg/borrow/buy a flexi brake hose clamp or even 2 , clamp the front hoses & bleed the rear brakes, once air free fluid issues from the bleed screw, tighten, then move to one of the front brakes, do each in turn, the check operation with clamps removed. don't know what else to suggest.

Hi, the front brakes work well, just no pedal at the rear. Pedal travells to half way and operated secondary circuit (front). I'm goimg to bleed master cylinder again and work my way back to the rear axle whilst someone pumps brakes. Its got to be air somewhere.

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Crack open the brake lines on the rear calipers in turn & let the fluid come out while your assistant presses the pedal down, hold the pedal down & tighten the pipes then do other side, reckon there's a gob of air still in there.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Only a thought but if the calipers are on the wrong side of the axle - they are handed - the bleed nipples are in an incorrect postion to allow the air to bleed properly - Do not ask me how I know this!!

I'm a bloody idiot, this is exactly what i'd done swapped them round and bled straight away. Thanks for the help.

Max

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