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Tools to get


ob1
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Good day

Starting to collect all the nessecary tools to do as much as possible maintenance and repairs myself. Do not believe it if you hear that labour in Africa is cheap.

Still quite a novice, will start doing all oils and filters, hopefully after few years overhaul the engine myself... With all your help of course

At this stage I have the proper Land Rover maintenance/ overhaul manuel; a set of spanners (12position grip ring and spanner combination) from 8-19; a Vice grip; light-medium hammer, screw drivers, pliers, wire etc.

Where would I find a proper shopping list of all needed tools on the web?

Your comments on specialized tools like torque wrench?

Any other advice welcome

Vehicle '97 110 300 Tdi Hard Top

Many ThankS!

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I think you have three options.

1. Add to your existing kit as you need to for specific jobs (cheapest in the short term)

2. Buy one of these full blown set of tools, in the UK you can get a lot of medium quality tools in a cabinet for about £400

post-784-1238011679_thumb.jpg

3. Go mad and buy everything you could need.

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to be honest, i would just buy tools when you find you need them.

its worked for me so far, that way what you have in your toolbox/chest/shed/whatever is necessary. at least you wont waste your money on stuff, you think you may need, but never find a use for!

jase :)

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a range of hammers, angle grinders and a few rolls of Duct tape :lol: :lol: :lol:

seriously a good start would be as above with a good socket set, good torque wrench, breaker bar, large adjustable spanner, molegrips range of screwdrivers, allen keys and a swear box

Steve

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seriously a good start would be as above with a good socket set, good torque wrench, breaker bar, large adjustable spanner, molegrips range of screwdrivers, allen keys and a swear box

Steve

Thanks. I wish I could get all at once, but life is life. I'll probably get it in bits. I wonder how S.W.A.M.B.O. is going t feel about that....

You mentioned good torque wrench second. how important is it to have correct torque?

One side of argument is that it is only important in stuff like cylinder head replace etc. Other side says EVERYTHING most be torqued correctly.

How about fitting a good newton pulling scale at the end of a breaker bar? ;)

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when i got my 90 i went and bought a halfords professional socket/spanner set. Cost about £60. never broken a single bit of it and has stood up to extraordinary abuse.

on top of that i got a long breaker bar, torque wrench, hub nut spanner and a range of hammers (from heavy to sledge) and a good range of screwdrivers.

never had cause to need any other tools, as all the above seem to cover most eventualities. If i get something they wont handle - out comes the grinder.

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Thanks forthe input.

The wise decision is to get it when I need it. I'll have an excuse every time, and I can justify to my dear SWAMBO that "it will pay for itself on what we save on labour, dear"

Did quite a bit of looking around. We have good brands available in S.A. Of course they are quite pricy. Had a look at Amazon.com and ebay, the prices are way cheaper than local, including import tax, exchange rates, deliviry etc. Example, can get on internet a torque wrench, full socket set with breaker bar and extentions delivered for the same price as a torque wrench purchase down the road.

Problem is I do not know the brands. Any reccomendations? What should I avoid? What size should the drive be (1/2" 3/8")

Thank Cheers for now

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make sure of a range of sockets of 30mm + sizes too IIRC 30/32/34 should suffice.

Halfords stuff is good, but do they have a Halfrauds in SA??

Nope. We have Gedore AFAIN the better quality. Ampro with lifetime warranty, few others too expensive to consider. Then there are what some one described as OK quality middle range tools. Unfortumately there are horrible quality stuff as well, not even suited for fixing a bicycle.

The 150000km servige coming up. Basic service, with oil filter change, I'll flush the radiator.I'll get the sockets for now, proper ones. Grease gun too.

Next one is 160k km, will get the torque wrench for the cambelt change

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If your first job is going to be the service then get yourself an oil filter wrench.

They feature either a strap or a chain and work a bit like a tourniquet, the tighter you turn the tighter it grips.

When you fit the new filter put a smear of oil on the rubber seal and only tighten by hand.

Steve

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You mentioned good torque wrench second. how important is it to have correct torque?

One side of argument is that it is only important in stuff like cylinder head replace etc. Other side says EVERYTHING most be torqued correctly.

Personally I think it's essential. For one, I wouldn't want to drive around in a vehicle if the wheel nuts weren't torqued up correctly, having a wheel come off while driving is not fun.

There are lots of cases on an LR where Torque settings are essential, and also times when it will cost you more in the long run if you don't. Drive flange nuts are a common example. Overtighten them and they'll keep coming undone. You can get away with buying new bolts but if it's done often enough you'll eventually you'll have to buy a new hub. All suspension bushes should be torqued up to correct amount to work correctly etc etc

Steve

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I have gathered enough from local boys, will gt proper torque wrench first, borrow proper sockets from the dad inlaw (luckily he is a cool guy).

I used to know a fellow that when he undo a filter, just stabbed a flatpoint screw driver trouht the cylender, used that as leverage. His argument is that the filter gets disposed of annyway.

Any toughts o that?

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your hand gets covered in hot oil which then runs up your sleeve , if the filter is really tight the screwdriver rips open the thin case and you are left with a jagged sharp stump which you cannot grip with the proper wrench that you have just had to buy anyway, and you end up gingerly tapping the rim around with a chisel trying not to damage the filter mounting [thats if you can get at it] ob1 dont do it!!

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I have gathered enough from local boys, will gt proper torque wrench first, borrow proper sockets from the dad inlaw (luckily he is a cool guy).

I used to know a fellow that when he undo a filter, just stabbed a flatpoint screw driver trouht the cylender, used that as leverage. His argument is that the filter gets disposed of annyway.

Any toughts o that?

this for me is a good way of doing it ONLY as a last resort. but its one of those last resorts thats a ditch atempt that never fails.

REMEMBER: if you did the last one it should never be so tight that you need to use this method. as already said when you put the new one on, put some oil around the seal, and tighten it hand tight.

regards from rainy england

Rob

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