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Sump gasket or no sump gasket? 300tdi


Tetsu0san
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Hi all

I have recently found the source of an oil leak on my Disco 1 300tdi engine. It's at the rear of the engine and it's either the sump and/or the rear crank bearing seals (they look like little 'T' shaped thingies and sit either side of the crankshaft main bearing cap).

My query is that my sump appears to have a gasket (although I have not removed the sump to confirm, but there is certainly a gasket type thing in there), and I can't find anywhere that sells a gasket. I am all in favour of using sealant for the sump if I have to but as it looks like it has a gasket then surely I should try to get another gasket.

Any advise will be greatly recieved.

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The 300Tdi engines should not have a gasket - they have always used RTV type sealant. If a gasket is fitted that is probably why its leaking - the design of the mating face on the sump pan is not flat as it is not intended for a gasket. Take it off and clean up both side thoroughly and use sealant to refit. Also check that the sump itself is not distorted as it is only a tin can and sometimes if it has been removed with too much force (and was well stuck on with sealant) then it may be bent along where it seals, which doesn't help! A small hammer and a bit of patience will usually sort it out.

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Had the sump off a 300 Tdi last year and put it back using RTV as Bogmonster advises .

Has been leak free since .

Just be sure to leave it long enough to set before use - in my case I left it 24 hrs.

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Many thanks for your advice. I think that is the only solution, but I am still confused why it would have a gasket in the first place. As Boggy said, perhaps thats the reason why it leaks!

Still, I am discovering new and interesting things all the time, perhaps that why they called it a discovery! 'Oh look, I discovered a new patch of oil on the drive...'

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Because somebody "thought it would be a better idea" - they may well be right in principle (I hate sealant personally - its a pain in the arris to get off and more hassle to put on as well) but the joint has to be the right sort. A front diff is a good example of where changing from sealant to gasket works fine, but the sump joint isn't because a gasket joint needs two flat mating faces to squeeze the gasket together and the sump doesn't have that as you'll see when you get it off.

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  • 8 years later...

L live in Kenya and drive a Tdi300 Landrover defender 1998 model. I had the same problem 4 months back, the mechanic fitted a gasket but the leak started again. Today I removed the gasket and carefully fitted a new one with a generous application of silicone sealant. True the sump is as described by Bogmonster. I was careful not to overly tighten the sump bolts. I have left the silicone to cure over 24 hours.

Will post the results in 7 days. 

Question is, why do the spare parts stores stock the gaskets? 

Who manufactures them and why? 

Am confused. 

Edited by Lumumba
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Each to their own,  sorry boys but I've always used a gasket.  The thin metal sump lip is prone to distortion and flexing so I've always used a gasket, with a smear of blue heat grade silicon either side for good measure and I've also never had an oil leak. 

Lumumba, I dont know where this question arises from,  my original hard copy of the works manual for the Series 1 Discovery clearly states to use a gasket with sealant either side. The gasket itself is a good 1.0 -1.25mm thick and compresses down to around 0.95mm once all the sump bolts are torqued correctly. The CD version of RAVE doesn't make too much mention of it.  If the sump was made of cast alloy with a machined face or had an additional steel flange spot welded as a flange stiffener I'd probably agree that a gasket wasn't required but as the flange easily deforms just on removing it I would always advise using the gasket simply to allow for any distortion. 

 

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On 5/17/2009 at 9:31 PM, Tetsu0san said:

Hi all

I have recently found the source of an oil leak on my Disco 1 300tdi engine. It's at the rear of the engine and it's either the sump and/or the rear crank bearing seals (they look like little 'T' shaped thingies and sit either side of the crankshaft main bearing cap).

My query is that my sump appears to have a gasket (although I have not removed the sump to confirm, but there is certainly a gasket type thing in there), and I can't find anywhere that sells a gasket. I am all in favour of using sealant for the sump if I have to but as it looks like it has a gasket then surely I should try to get another gasket.

Any advise will be greatly recieved.

My guess is your leak is from the infamous "T" seals, they are a total sod to install correctly.  My method, and the only one I've found to be reasonably foolproof  is to use the little metal blocks shown in the works manual, these have a radiused edge to allow the "T" seals to be compressed into the rear bearing block without tearing them. They can be easily made up from two pieces of 10mm thick x 15mm wide steel bar --  a liberal application of Vaseline onto the new "T" seals is is also required to ensure that they slide into the block.   Don't forget to apply a good quantity of Blue grade silicon to the rear face of the bearing block to seal it up to the rear oil seal carrier, Oh, and as I've said elsewhere, use a gasket with a smear of silicon. 

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