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Camel trophy modifications and videos


Fern
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Maybe this forum has answers for these questions but could not find:(

1) Where can I find a modification list of camel trophy prepared Disco?

2) Where can I find videos to download? I've searched torrents but found only several, '92 and '95 and the whole overview of camel trophy.

Thanks

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Maybe this forum has answers for these questions but could not find:(

1) Where can I find a modification list of camel trophy prepared Disco?

2) Where can I find videos to download? I've searched torrents but found only several, '92 and '95 and the whole overview of camel trophy.

Thanks

This any good http://www.discoweb.org/martingeveke/cameldisco.htm

http://www.cameltrophyvehicles.com/vehicles.htm

kalimantan96050.jpg

10.jpg

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From what i remember i thought they had a heavierr rated spring to cope with the extra weight and the "camel cut" performed on the wheelarches to allow for the taller tyres, i dont recall them having any transmission upgrades. maybe raised breathers?

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Thanks.

And the tires size was something like 235x85x16? "7.00 R 16 Michelin" explains me nothing.

The tyres were 7.00R16 ... that's the tyre size and they were mainly Michelin XCLs what else did you need to know? :huh:

The last of the line ones used (I think) 225/75R16 BFGs on alloys but only in the last year (1997 I think)

Edit: the vehicle in that photo actually has Michelin XZLs on so according to this must have been in 1996

http://www.landrovernet.com/forum/showthread.php?p=770722

and according to that link the BFGs were 245/75R16 not 225s

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  • 6 years later...

Having seen one (my local spare parts guy owns one) I can tell you that on close inspection the roll cage is installed prior to the roof going on. Holes are drilled in the roof panel (40mm diameter) to correspond to where the six carry points go through the roof from the roll cage to support the roof rack -- fitting the lining can only be done as the roof panel is pressed down, as there is simply no room to install it afterwards as the roll cage is hard up against the roof.

The roll cage also has a bar which passes through the dash board to connect to the two "A" pillar risers, a secondary brace goes above the rear door to space the two "D" pillars.

The A, B. C and D loops pass through the floor pan and are bracketed to the chassis rails. B&C loops are cross braced. B left to right and C right to left, a horizontal bar connects A - D to support the roof rack.

It would seem to be fabricated from seamless chrome moly pipe.

In short, it's a superb work of art and fabrication, my guess would be that to fabricate one, and have it installed would cost in the vicinity of AUD$25,000.00

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As standard the roll cage isn't bolted to the chassis it only bolts to the body, which was never properly re-enforced. A lot of the disco camels have suffered with the body bushes/mounts collapsing due to the extra added weight. The roll cage comes out quite easily... so doubt they are put in during body fabrication.

http://www.safetydevices.com/expedition/products/roll-cage/Land+Rover+Discovery+1+-1989-1998-5-door-post+1995+dash+change/252/1111/

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Maverik, I'll take a couple of photos of the chassis brackets the next time I see this Camel Disco, the cage comes through the floor (all 4 hoops) and are bolted to brackets welded to the external face of the chassis. The roof rack is carried by the roll cage - not the roof. All penetrations by the roll cage are sealed by large rubber grummets (floor & roof) so that the body is "floating" on the original rubber mounting pads.

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Hey Iain, I'd be interested to see the fittings for sure, but it doesn't sounds standard camel spec out the box. The roof racks does fit as you say with a spacer tube keeping the main part of the rack off the roof and sitting on the internal cage except two brackets at the back which bolt through/sandwich the roof panel, the load guard behind the rear seats also fixes to the roll cage which then fixes to a shelf all a bit tricky to make fully independent, the racks are incredibly heavy items, I was thinking of trying to copy the design using aluminium tube to try cut down some of the weight.

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When at the dunsfold open day a vehicle write up eluded to ' camel discovery ' spec axles which I assumed maybe means they had 4 pin diffs in them?

Will.

Will, I've never been into a camel diff as yet, but I've never heard of such a modification talking to other camel owners. I'd also question it, as land rover where big on selling the point that the vehicles where still a standard "off the shelf" product although enhanced with a roof rack and a few other bolt on bits. I'll have a poke around see if there's anything in it.

Edit: after a few googles a few other references allude to such a thing to, interesting... all I can say is if it was a lr standard part on any model then anything goes... you do find a fair few defender bits here and there...

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I meant to ask on the camel stand but my anorak was already in overdrive looking at 90 and 110s. You can tell by looking through the filler plug hole usually.

As they were standard on V8 90s it would make sense to fit them I would say.

Will.

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What am I looking for when I look in the filler hole? I'll have a look when I get the chance - the club is a great source of info on the CT, but unless you get the right person technical questions about quite "mechanical" subjects probably wouldn't get answered. It's quite exciting a new CT LR90 had recently come back to the UK and the camel club, Not very many of them about at all.

If any CT vehicles had transmission modifications it would be the discovery, they where so utterly overloaded weight wise, they needed all the help they could get but keeping the mods under the "land rover" production blanket.

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You will see the machined carrier for the 4 planet gears as opposed to the normal open carrier and ring gear flange . It's pretty obvious if it is a

4 planet . I always thought the trans. was std on CT vehicles to emphasise the out of the crate abilities , but I may be wrong .

Blashford-Snell could have done with them in the 2dr RRC's on the Darien Gap expedition for sure

cheers

Steveb

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Maverik, the weight difference between seamless chrome moly pipe and alloy is miniscule and the moly pipe is far, far stronger. Alloy roll cages were banned here in Australia by CAMS (Confederation of Australian Motor Sports) years ago because they were lacking in strength and were prone to collapse in a roll-over. I rolled my Daihatsu Charade rally car 6 times at well over 140kph during the Canberra rally in 1997, 3 times end to end and 3 times side to side, the only "straight" panel was the fuel filler lid :blush: - when Daihatsu put the car on the alignment rack it was only 3mm out of true - due to the fact that the moly roll cage was fully braced to all points inside the car. The car cost me $AUD10,000 new, the roll cage cost me $AUD13,000 - cheap life insurance. ^_^

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If any CT vehicles had transmission modifications it would be the discovery, they where so utterly overloaded weight wise, they needed all the help they could get but keeping the mods under the "land rover" production blanket.

TBH all the Camels are quite overloaded, I've been round a few of various vintages and aside from protection and a few oddities there was nothing about the base vehicle you couldn't get off the LR production line, so there is no secret "camel-spec" diff or halfshaft etc.

What you don't see on the videos is the overnight air-drops of spare parts and the huge crew of engineers fixing the cars while the crews sleep, remember the event was fundamentally a PR exercise!

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I was thinking aluminium just for the roof rack, not the roll cage itself, the rack is rediculously heavy built for what they carried.

There are some great event photos I've seen of some of the repairs taking place, like the axle changes and gearbox changes. As most of the support vehicles where driven by Brits,they where mostly right hand drives so there are a lot of them in the UK, I known of at least 5 workshop vehicles that where pretty kitted out.

There are lists of the spares that where taken out there, and they pretty much had a handful of trucks packed up in component form in the back of hi-caps. It'd ridiculous when you think about it.

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