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Series 3 facts

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I was on Wikipedia and i read the following blurb on the Series 3 section

In 1980 the 4-cylinder 2.25 litre engines (both petrol and diesel) were updated with five-bearing crankshafts to increase strength in heavy duty work. At the same time the transmission, axles and wheel hubs were re-designed for increased strength. This was the culmination of a series of updates to the transmission that had been made since the 1960s to combat the all-too-common problem of the rear axle half-shafts breaking in heavy usage. This problem was partly due to the design of the shafts themselves. (6 cylinder + Rover rear end = broken diff, broken axles). Due to the fully-floating design of the rear wheel hubs, the half shafts can be removed very quickly without even having to jack the vehicle off the ground. The tendency for commercial operators to overload their vehicles exacerbated this flaw which blighted the Series Land Rovers in many of their export markets and established a reputation that continues in many markets to the present day. This is despite the 1982 re-design (mainly the changing of the driveshafts from 10 driving-splines to 24 to reduce stress) all but solved the problem.

Is that correct about the 10 spline shafts being upgraded to 24?

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Wiki is not always a reliable source of information. The last of the series 2a's saw the introduction of the all synchro gearbox and Salisbury rear diff in LWB models which were then carried over to the series 3 models with the addition of larger wheel stud and nuts and additional ribbing on the Sals diff casting. Fully floating halfshafts have been a feature of Landrovers since around1958, so nothing new there either. Only the Salisbury had larger 24 spline halfshafts in a much larger completely different hypoid differential. For some reason the LWB model had 24 spline outer shafts on the universally jointed front axles but still retained the weak 10 spline inner shafts.

SWB models retained the old ten spline halfshafts in much the same old spiral bevel differential that over the years saw minor changes that never really addressed the problem of simply being too weak.SWB 2a export axle housings were reinforced with channel section steel welded to the underside of the axle tubes . these reinforcing bars were omitted on series 3's. It was claimed that stronger steel was used in the housings construction, so they didn't require the extra reinforcing.The all synchro gearbox did address the issue of layshafts fatigueing and breaking in half that was the main weakness that earlier boxes were noted for, but introduced a spate of 1st 2nd gear issues such as jumping out of gear on overun or engine braking, poor sychro/ difficult gearchange performance etc. In Australia the 5 bearing crankshaft engine was rarely seen, and then only on the last models ever sold here circa 1982.In some respects the series 3 was inferior to the 2a's due to poor quality Belgium steel used in the chassis and bulkhead leading to premature rust out and fatigue cracking in rough conditions.Also the introduction of the padded dash considerably weakened the bulkhead compared to the all steel open glove compartments of the earlier series. A long time LandRover panel beater I used to know also reckoned the aluminium used on series 3's was not as strong as on 2a's.

Bill.

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Yes the article is correct, they went form 10 driving splines to 24 in approx 1982.

I have 1984 SWB axles and they have 24 spline outers, with 10 spline inners.

Plenty of info on them on the web.

I've given them as much stick as I can with the 2.25d and I haven't broken one yet!

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Yes the article is correct, they went form 10 driving splines to 24 in approx 1982.

I have 1984 SWB axles and they have 24 spline outers, with 10 spline inners.

Plenty of info on them on the web.

I've given them as much stick as I can with the 2.25d and I haven't broken one yet!

Rover often used up obsolete stock on vehicles exported to Australia, so if leaf sprung rear halfshafts were ever made with 24 spline outers and 10 spline inners it would be news to us over here. Like a chain being only as strong as its weakest link there would be no strength advantages in such a halfshaft anyway.

Bill.

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If I remember correctly it was called a 'rationalised' axle, and was used to reduce the number of different parts required as the 90 was now being produced.

Most parts are still interchangeable, I swapped the swivel with a 10 spline axle and also split the drive shaft in the middle to swap half of it over with a better one. (swapped the long part).

It's easy to tell if the axle is the newer type as those little hub caps which go on over the end, are metal on the old ones and plastic with a seal on the new ones.

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It's easy to tell if the axle is the newer type as those little hub caps which go on over the end, are metal on the old ones and plastic with a seal on the new ones.

The 1980+ hubs still used the o-ring and galvanised cone. It was the 90 and 110 hubs that used the plastic cone. The 1980+ hubs were rationalised to use the same bearings and seals as the Range Rover, and were superseded by the 90 and 110 as they entered production.

The late axles did change to 24 splines at the outer ends, but the diffs remained 10 spline. This did not alter strength, only the resistance to spline wear at the drive flanges. The torque strength od the diffs and half shafts was unchanged. The other change that occured on these axles (other than the stub axles, made to match the new bearings) was the rationalisation of brakes to the 11", dual circuit, twin leading shoe (front).

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The 1980+ hubs still used the o-ring and galvanised cone. It was the 90 and 110 hubs that used the plastic cone. The 1980+ hubs were rationalised to use the same bearings and seals as the Range Rover, and were superseded by the 90 and 110 as they entered production.

Mine was a 1984 axle which has the plastic caps as Phil states. You have to drop them in a cup of boiling water to soften them up then push them on. I got funny looks when I last asked for them at the parts shop and ended up having to buy a 90 one, when I got it back it was shorter than the old ones but fitted so I've got one which looks slightly different now

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I was on Wikipedia and i read the following blurb on the Series 3 section

In 1980 the 4-cylinder 2.25 litre engines (both petrol and diesel) were updated with five-bearing crankshafts to increase strength in heavy duty work. At the same time the transmission, axles and wheel hubs were re-designed for increased strength. This was the culmination of a series of updates to the transmission that had been made since the 1960s to combat the all-too-common problem of the rear axle half-shafts breaking in heavy usage. This problem was partly due to the design of the shafts themselves. (6 cylinder + Rover rear end = broken diff, broken axles). Due to the fully-floating design of the rear wheel hubs, the half shafts can be removed very quickly without even having to jack the vehicle off the ground. The tendency for commercial operators to overload their vehicles exacerbated this flaw which blighted the Series Land Rovers in many of their export markets and established a reputation that continues in many markets to the present day. This is despite the 1982 re-design (mainly the changing of the driveshafts from 10 driving-splines to 24 to reduce stress) all but solved the problem.

Is that correct about the 10 spline shafts being upgraded to 24?

I am not sure but I think it is true.

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