Jump to content
If you value this forum's future please support us
GBMUD

How do I check that an axle is straight?

Recommended Posts

If I were looking at a Salisbury axle, not attached to a vehicle, how would I be able to reliably check it was not bent?

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Put it on axle stands. Look along the length. You'll soon notice a bend. Well we did with te last one I saw bent.

They also tend to throw halfshafts out when bent....

mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stand it upright on the flange on a level lump of plate

Place a straight edge across the top equal overhang each sidfe

Measure from the end of each of the overhangs to the base

they should be equal, if not its bent :(

Do this to check axle bend back to front and up / down

if that makes sense as casings can bend either way

Nige

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stand it upright on the flange on a level lump of plate

Place a straight edge across the top equal overhang each sidfe

Measure from the end of each of the overhangs to the base

they should be equal, if not its bent :(

Do this to check axle bend back to front and up / down

if that makes sense as casings can bend either way

Nige

How about using a builders level on the plate first to get it level, then on the axle flange?

Would this be a quick check or more involved?

Marc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it has wheels and tyres on you could check the tracking with either an old-style tracking bar measuring the distance between the sidewalls front/back and top/bottom, or a proper wheel alignment setup if you can access one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The way the diff places do it here in aussie is to get an old diff centre, pull out the spider gears, and place a long piece of solid bar though the stub shaft through the diff centre and out the other stub shaft. the bar needs to be held securely by the diff centre.

this will show up any distortion in the housing and then the housing can be heated up on the appropiate side to shrink it back.

A bit of mucking around to set up yourself but you could hire it out for others to use? :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maxidrive Mal simply suggested putting the axles in the casing, engaged with the side gears. Move the outer end of the axle in a circle at the limit of the freeplay, around the inside of the housing tube. Unless the diff end splines are trashed, you should not be able to make the outer end of the axle touch the inside of the casing tube in any direction, and if the tube is straight, the axle should maintain the same clearance all the way around. If it's able to get closer to the tube on one side, then it's bent.

Mal also suggested that most Salisbury casings he's ever encountered (and that would be rather a lot) are at least slightly bent from the factory. Howver, this doesn't seem to cause much of a problem, except when fitting Maxidrive lockers.

Straightening a bent Salisbury is pretty easy, and doesn't require much more than brute force, like this:

P4180090Small.jpg

Yes, I know that's a Rover axle, not a Salisbury, but the method is the same. The hydraulic porta power was used to keep tension on the casing whilst the Maxidrive mounting block was being welded on, but straightening the housing is the same setup, with just a few more pumps on the hydraulics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now




×