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Cambelt change


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I think I have to change the cambelt this summer on my 98 mod Defender 300tdi, last time was in 2004 and it has gone about 60000km since then. I`m planning to do this my self and have read different links about it, is it necessary to change the crankshaft gear and seal, or is it ok just to change the cambelt and idler/tensioner? It will be the first time I do it, any special tips to make it easier? I`m planning to buy the parts from paddockspares.com are they ok? :)

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When I took mine in recently for a cambelt change, they told me they had fitted a new part (cant remember the name) that has a shoulder on it to stop the belt slipping off.

Dont know if that makes sense, but something for you to consider.

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http://www.difflock.com/servicing/300tdi-timingbelt/index.shtml

The above link is also a very good one for replacing the belt, just ignore the bit about it being a Disco and not a Defender as the mechanics are exactly the same. This is the one I followed when doing my 300TDi Defender last year.

My own preferene was to buy the Difflock timing-pin kit & crankshaft locking tool, the latter allows you to remove the pully in a controlled way and also torque it up correctly on reassembly. The only other special tools you may not already own could be a viscous fan spanner and a pair of torque wrenches (deflection & micrometer). I already owned two of these three items but none are expensive and you recoupe the money many times over if you do the job again. Even if you bought all the tools and the cambelt kit in one go they would still be less than going to a non-franchised dealer to get them to do the job for you.

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I've just done this, and I had a struggle to pull the crankshaft sprocket off - had to fashion a puller, it seems water had seeped between crank & both the crank pulley & this, and caused a bit of rusting inside. When(if) you come to put it back after replacing the seal and O ring behind I used a spacer and the bolt in the crank to make sure it had gone all the way back onto the crank, otherwise if it's slightly out of line, you'll set the belt tension slightly wrong. I ended up having to take the radiator and grille out to tighten the crank bolt up, and as I'd drained most of the coolant took the opportunity to give it all a good flush, and though a lot of muck had come out while it was in, once out a considerable amount more came out. For what it's worth next time I'd take it out to start with, gives you a lot more room to work.

Regards

Nigel

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Personally I would always remove the rad as it give much better access and gives you a chance to clean out the cooling system, for the sake of a few minutes work why struggle and make life more awkward for yourself? Also use the opertunity to flush out the intercooler as well.

My cranksft bolt came undone easily enough using the locking tool and the timing kit includes a HD puller for the pully.

I had to wait for a new aux belt tensioner to arrive before finally completing the job but used the time & space to clean & underseal the front crossmember, flush out the cooling system etc but I think that using all the correct tools the job is easily done DIY in about 4-hours.

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Litch has mentioned it already, but getting the crank bolt undone is relativley easy (esp if you use the starter motor trick). Torquing it up whilst holding the engine in gear on the handbrake is probably not reliable in my opinion - i'd have thought at the torque necessary for that bolt, you could slip the clutch before acheiving the torque required. The crank locking tool (i made my own) allows you to both undo AND torque up the bolt correctly. All of the timing pins can be bought on ebay for about £40 - a fraction of the cost of the job a garage would charge.

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Thanks for advise. Is it necessary to change the crankshaft sprocket if its not worn, or if it is no leak from the seal? Was it hard to remove the crankshaft bolt, or did you just flick the starter trick? :rolleyes:

I think the thing is 'if it's not worn'. You won't know till you get in there. I think my belt was overdue for changing as bits were starting to come off at the shoulders. The crank sprocket was quite worn on the shoulder on one side, at least it had had a really good polishing - on the other side, I've seen cleaner. I'd be a little wary of leaving it for another 60k. It's quite thin on the shoulders so once you try to pry it off - it's worn. The seal was already leaking a little - have a peer up the wading hole to see if it's oily. Mine was, so I knew I had to do the seal. The bolt came undone first go with the starter trick. For retightening I have an epicyclic multiplier, and I tightened the bolt to 80Nm then marked it and the pulley with paint spots so I could gauge 90 deg. Even with the multiplier it took a colossal series of heaves to do it up. I had it in 4th gear high as that is direct - if you put it in low etc you are encouraging it to move. I'd say do it once, do it right. The seals are a couple of quid each, I think the pulley is 17.50ish. I made a timing pin - drilled and tapped a wading plug, and inserted a 6mm bolt, and it held the engine fine while I was changing the belt. Otherwise I pretty much followed Mr Henson's excellent advice, plus when getting the pulley off I made a puller as per his suggestion, but left one end too long, and it came in handy to hit a bit to help it loosen.

Regards

Nigel

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just done my timing belt this morning.

you can leave the rad connected. i just took the grill off the front and then removed the top arms that hold the rad frame in place then took the top section of the frame off. you can then lift the rad independently of the intercooler with the pipes still connected up enough to get a windy gun with extension onto the crank bolt.

i used a crank puller to get the crank pulley off in the end, despite the fact it was off 500miles ago!

i also have the crank locking tool from difflock as being an auto and with no slot in the flywheel is a pain trying to use the starter ring to lock it in place. the tool bolts to the pulley leaving access to the crank bolt through the middle of the tool. the tool arm then rests on the chassis rails.

what you need to change depends which kit if fitted to the engine.

some of them (early 300tdis) had a shoulder on the tensioner and no shoulder on the crank sprocket.

the later ones and what you get with a mod kit is a new tensioner with no shoulder and a shoulder on the crank sprocket plus a new idler.

Note there are two idlers one for each different tensioner design. plus you will need the allen bolt/screws/slotted head washer etc depending on which tensioner and idler partnership you go for.

have you tried Exeter 4x4 for parts i am sure they would send it across.

i dont use Paddocks after the quoted me one price on the phone and billed me something different!

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