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V8 from range rover classic to series 3


sussex-landy
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I have a series 3 1970 with standard gearbox and 3.5 carb V8 which I have blown a hole in the side so i bought and ex classic 3.5 with an auto box on the same carbs, exactly the same engine.

having cleaned it all up and stripped off the auto box and all bits, i have come to fit the old flywheel and spacer washer with the six holes in it before refitting the clutch and to my amzement the end of the crank is longer than the one I took it off so the spacer with the bush doesnt fit and the bolts are too long to fit on their own, besides the bush looks like it needs to support the gearbox snuggly which it wont do without it.

What can be done, please dont tell me I have to revuilg the entire 3.5 with a new crank that has a shorter end for the save of about 5mm !!!!!

i nearly did the john Clees moment to it today with the large stick in my hand.

Anyway any supoprt any can give to help me overcome this issue i would be bery grateful.

Thanks

Robert

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Assuming your Series is an engine swap in the 1st place (not a Stage 1 V8) then there's a chance the original lump is SD1 not Range Rover. Memory is a bit flaky but it may be a question of just grinding a bit off the back of the crank, could be wrong though.

A picture tells a thousand words, post one up if you can.

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Grinding was the first thing that came to mind but trying not to be a bull in a china shop i thought I would post on here. Both engines are identical even down to the flush red filler cap half way down the rocker cover. Seems strange the crank is a few mm longer on the engine from the calssic range rover automatic to the one in my Land rover series 3. The six bolt holes line up identical but I think I would have to grind off a good 5-8mm to make it work, I would prefer to do this as a last resort though.

Thanks

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Nice, it looks like I will have to do the same, was it pretty easy, I see yours is on a stand and stripped, mine is complete and ready for fitting as I didnt realise I was going to have to do this.

Is it critical it is 100% flat to save any balance issues or is it so small it wont matter.

Thanks

Robert

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On a side note, once I get the 3,5 V8 sorted and installed which hopefully now I have some confirmation a bit of grinding wont hurt it, I want to look at a 3.9 or 4.0 replacement which I can buy and fully rebuild.

I am leaning towards a 4.0 as my P38 Rangie has 120,000 on the clock and although its always serviced and runs sweet I know one day its going to need stripping and rebuilding. Is there any considerations for either a 3.9 or 4.0 and same question afain for carbs or efi.

Was the 3.9 fairly straight forward to swap out.

Thanks

Robert

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Do you have the bolt on type spigot bush as part of your V8 conversion kit? If so it was standard practice when fitting these to hacksaw a few mm off the end of the crank.

IMHO its a horrible way of doing it, but its been done that way for years!

Jon

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I would be surprised if it is an SD1 issue as I swapped my P5 V8 for an SD1 V8 without touching the crank other than fitting a new push in bush.

Can't say I have ever heard of the spigot end of the crank being too long before?

Marc.

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Me neither but its way too long for the bits that came off the old V8 fitted to my series 3 so the spigot bush cant fit into the hole.

The flywheel that came off the engine with the auto box had a plate front and back so I guess its thicker coming off a classic range rover with a three speed auto box. I have posted a picture of the conversion kit what was on it which I removed and am selling if anyone is interested.

Grinding down about 5-8mm should do it so it matches the crank that was on the engine that came out.

Thanks

Robert

post-21981-127654941415_thumb.gif

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take it easy with the grinder if the crank is in the engine, don't want to produce too much heat near the crank seal.

It was fairly easy, I managed to get mine pretty flat.

The 3.9 was easy enough to drop into the Series3, I would guess the same as fitting a 3.5. The engine came out of my RRC when I fitted a later "serpentine" engine to it. (still have that engine but the RRC met a sticky end).

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Is it worth taking teh crank seal out and if so does it come out without taking the sump and other items off so it can be easily changed.

Thanks

Robert

Try a hacksaw first, might take a while but will produce less heat.

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Make sure you eat Weatabix beforehand!

Heh, I thought about my response the other day and really couldn't remember if I'd used a hacksaw or the grinder. I would guess it was the grinder now I come to think of it...

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I took your warning and plumbed for the hacksaw last night which took just over two hours turning and sawing to keep it even and eventually I got the bulk of it off but my right arm is now like Arnie !!!

The grinder finished off the last bit and levelled it out nicely and afterwards I did wonder as it stayed pretty cool throughout, still its done now.

Thanks

Robert

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