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Seat Box End Section Replacement


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Morning All

Am hoping someone will be able to help. I need to replace both ends of my seatbox as they have corroded through at the back there it bolts to the rear tub.

I know i can get the replacement parts from YRM but my problem is the inability to weld. So was wondering if it was possible to rivit the two bits together. Would use the new section as a template to mark seat box, cut the corroded end off, then use a 2" wide bit of ally bonded and rivited across the underside of the joint.

Anyone with any thoughts, good or bad, please let me know

Cheers

Simon

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I agree with Ralph, I did some seat box repirs in said way. If after replacing the material you think it still feels a bit flimsy, I also bought some angle sections and tatically braced some of the sections (just sealed/rivited the angle against the plate), just always bear in mind where the ends of the rivets will sit, make sure they don't clash with any other bits underneithe the box.

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I think you'll find that the seatbox ends are riveted into place anyway, Why don't you e-mail YRM and ask them how they are fixed to the box? or you could look here-http://www.yrm-metal-solutions.co.uk/fitting-series-underseat-toolboxseatbox-ends-at-lro-show-3-w.asp

ok it is a series seat box but I'm pretty sure that they'd be the same sort of fixings

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I replaced the drivers side with a YRM panel. Easy to do, and fitted very well. The originals are only spot-welds, You have to get a chisel under the front corner after you've drilled out the spot-welds to ease the panel out, that's the spot welded bit IIRC. Once the new panel is in place and pop-riveted, this corner can then be gently tapped back round to re-form the corner, which you can then pop-rivet. Once done, it looks great.

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I replaced both seat box ends of my 1993 NAS D110 with replacements from YRM. I removed the entire box from the vehicle, disassembled it by drilling out the rivets for the battery and tool boxes. Then I cut out the two ends. This step took the longest time and if I had to do again, I would drill out the spot welds. I then matched drilled the ends and rivetted it all back togther with OEM rivets (using some 65-75 rivets). Once painted the box looked as good as new. When I reinstalled it in the vehicles, I made seals from rubber gasket material to go between the seat box end flanges and the sills.

To assist with alignments during the reassembly process, I borrowed a technique from the aircraft industry. I bought about 20 Clecos and a Cleco pliers. Basically, the Clecos allow you to temporaily assemble (it is a clamp that is inserted into a drilled hole). Assembled using clecos, once I was happy with the overall fit quality, I would remove a cleco and rivet, hole by hole.

If using OEM rivets I woukld invest in a heavy duty or air powered rivet tool. It takes several strong pulls on a small hand held rivet gun to seat the OEM rivets. Finally, before reinstalling, I seam sealed all of the seals. I haqve a couple pictures of the entire process if interested.

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I replaced both seat box ends of my 1993 NAS D110 with replacements from YRM. I removed the entire box from the vehicle, disassembled it by drilling out the rivets for the battery and tool boxes. Then I cut out the two ends. This step took the longest time and if I had to do again, I would drill out the spot welds. I then matched drilled the ends and rivetted it all back togther with OEM rivets (using some 65-75 rivets). Once painted the box looked as good as new. When I reinstalled it in the vehicles, I made seals from rubber gasket material to go between the seat box end flanges and the sills.

To assist with alignments during the reassembly process, I borrowed a technique from the aircraft industry. I bought about 20 Clecos and a Cleco pliers. Basically, the Clecos allow you to temporaily assemble (it is a clamp that is inserted into a drilled hole). Assembled using clecos, once I was happy with the overall fit quality, I would remove a cleco and rivet, hole by hole.

If using OEM rivets I woukld invest in a heavy duty or air powered rivet tool. It takes several strong pulls on a small hand held rivet gun to seat the OEM rivets. Finally, before reinstalling, I seam sealed all of the seals. I haqve a couple pictures of the entire process if interested.

Cleco's also know in UK as gripper pins for sheet metal holding/repairs

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