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leaf spring mounts


bluespanner
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Don't think they were ever a separate part if that's what you mean, you may find something suitable from the states as they often sell axle conversion kits & brackets and whatnot. If you know the width of the spring (3" from memory) and the diameter of the axle tube you are away.

You could make them yourself, they're not tricky to do, it's just lining them up & welding them on securely that's the hard part.

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You can buy them in the states. They're 2.5" wide, axletube is 80mm diameter. Other thing you need to look out for is that the hole where the leaf spring centre bolt sits in is the correct size. Fronts are 12mm and rears 16mm IIRC.

I made them myself from 5mm wall box section. Easy as pie.

IMG_7987.jpg

I made them very large to help resist spring wrap. Staying SUA they don't need to be so large.

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cool installation toyroverlander!

I ended up hacking some old mounts off.

Yeah, 300tdi axles under the series 2. All done and dusted, apart from the front prop getting a bit angry with the o/s engine mount under braking. I'm gonna make some mega fabricated shackles (12") to level the diff up and get a better castor angle.

Cheers., Roland

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Thanks!

I'm gonna make some mega fabricated shackles (12") to level the diff up and get a better castor angle.

BAD idea!

I don't know why the front driveshaft gets close to the engine mount.. what did you do? What's your castor angle? When it's set like a coiler the diff points up quite high which might cause that problem.

You're better off compromising the castor angle a bit (increasing it to 6-7 degrees or so). That lowers the nose of the diff.

Making silly long shackles has some serious disadvantages. When viewed from the side the leaf springs will be on an angle (front mount way higher than shackle end of spring). That creates a lot of dive when you hit the brakes. Offroad, when articulating, the side with the drooped wheel will have a big arch in the spring and it tends to bend the spring when power is applied to that axle creating wheel hop. It's not a positive way of putting power to the ground.

The flatter the spring (arch in spring and position of spring under vehicle) the better!

When I had RRC axles under my 109' I had a 10degree castor angle to keep the diff nose down. Clearance between tierod and springs was measured in mm's though. Steering gets heavier that way and when bits like steering joints and such are worse the 'castor slap' (death wobble) becomes a bit of a problem when hitting potholes at low speed.

Comparo1.jpg

That's a before and after shot of my front suspension. The before shot shows the RRC axles and the rear springs up front which are at too big of an angle under the vehicle and gives the problems I described above. I got this angle because the shackle mount wasn't a bush in the chassis but was positioned underneath the chassis combined with one-ton shackles.

After shot shows revised spring position with bush in chassis, nice shackle angle and the Toy axle. Power delivery to the axle is WAY better. No wheelhop, well I do get a bit at max articulation but it's a leaf spring after all. No massive brake dive and unloading on hillclimbs. And no need anymore for a massive slipjoint in the front driveshaft.

With the old situation the axle moved more than 2" in either direction while articulating.

Just saying.....

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Hey thanks for the input. I'm aware of the pro's and cons of putting disc axles on a series... and i'm aiming for a compromise at best.

I have no idea what my castor angle is, but the track rod misses the spring by about 10mm when sitting level. I can't let the axle sit any more level without the track rod fouling then spring, unless i plug and retap the axle tube ends in a different position, which i'm not really capable of atm.

I dont really know what to do apart from make the spring lean back, like in your photo

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How I did it was also a compromise. I needed the front end to come up a fair bit as it was sitting so low compared to the back end (heavy motor, soft springs). But it was a terrible compromise to be honest.

I'll give you an example of one of the bad things. When greenlaning, driving over pot holed dirt roads, the front wheels would constantly kick left to right when going through the potholes and you could feel each and every pothole while it jerked the steering wheel left to right. VERY annoying I can tell you!

Think long and hard about doing that as you will hate how it drives afterwards!

Perhaps the simplest compromise is taller bumpstops so the driveshaft won't hit the engine mount under braking.

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Have a look at the work I'm doing on my 109 - I have been preparing a pair of axles (front from Discovery, rear from 110) to fit to the leaf springs. It has been a slow project, but apart from the odd shaped right inner U-bolt and modified spring plates (they need to be shortened to bring the dampers closer to the axle), they're pretty much ready to go on. It's all documented with photos at nickslandrover.co.uk

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Have a look at the work I'm doing on my 109 - I have been preparing a pair of axles (front from Discovery, rear from 110) to fit to the leaf springs. It has been a slow project, but apart from the odd shaped right inner U-bolt and modified spring plates (they need to be shortened to bring the dampers closer to the axle), they're pretty much ready to go on. It's all documented with photos at nickslandrover.co.uk

That's a good idea, there's great info on there!

Just an FYI, there's no need to modify the spring plates, you can use the rear spring plates of an 88". Gives the exact same result, but without all the effort ;)

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That's a good idea, there's great info on there!

Just an FYI, there's no need to modify the spring plates, you can use the rear spring plates of an 88". Gives the exact same result, but without all the effort ;)

Ah - I had considered that and even located a pair from another forum, but a quick measure-up with the rear plates on my Lightweight suggested that the dampers would foul the axle and that I need plates with damper spigots roughly half way between those on front plates and 88 rears, but I may have mis-measured them. Is that what you did, Koos?

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That's always a good thing ;)

Just found this pic. This is how mine was setup, see the big u-joint angle at the diff? U-joint angle at the t-case was practically zero.... Vibrations anyone?? Didn't notice them in 2wd, but in 4wd it would rattle like mad even at low speeds (25mph).

PICT0593.jpg

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If the prop UJs aren't deflected by the same amount, you will get vibration when 4wd is engaged (or always on the rear prop, which is why cheap "lifts" using 1-ton shackles are a bad idea), but there is a formula for offsetting the rotational positions of the UJs to counter this, just as they did on RRC/Defender front prop shafts. If you can measure the two deflection angles and the distance between them, then Bailey Morris should eb able to tell you how much to rotate the UJs apart at the slip joint, and hopefully the splines will permit a close approximation of that angle.

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