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Guess the weight time


sutty_32
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Hi everyone,

Got a chassis which is just about ready to collect for a 107inch series 1, obviously I will need to pick it up on a trailer, but being young I don't have a towing licence, so weight is limited to 3.5 tonnes

Anybody know how much the average 12ft car transporter weighs? Does 500kg sound reasonable?

And for the chassis around 200kg?

So if my guesses are reasonable it should be under 3.5ton behind the 300tdi disco.

Thanks in advance for your help :)

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Technically your towing weight is limited to either the difference between the Disco's kerb weight and 3,500kg or the kerb weight of the Disco if that is the lower number.

So say your Disco weighs 2,000kg kerb weight, you can tow 1,500kg behind it. But if it weighed 1,500kg you could not tow 2,000kg behind it. Only 1,500kg.

Category B vehicles may be coupled with a trailer up to 750kgs MAM (allowing a combined weight up to 4.25 tonnes MAM) or a trailer over 750kgs MAM provided the MAM of the trailer does not exceed the unladen weight of the towing vehicle, and the combination does not exceed 3.5 tonnes MAM.

Remember it's the plated weight of the trailer that counts, not the actual weight. So if it's a 2,000kg MAM trailer then that's the figure you need to use. That's how I interpret the above anyway.

I did read somewhere that there was a case where the opposite was established, and the 'offender' was taken to a weighbridge for checking. But I leave that decision up to you :P

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We've been through all this recently, and I was wrong last time so I'm not going to repeat myself!

However, to answer some of the other questions:

Anybody know how much the average 12ft car transporter weighs? Does 500kg sound reasonable?

I'd have said that was a bit on the light side. My IWT 2000kg 10 ft x 4ft 6 twin axle weighs that, and I'd hope that a 12ft car trailer was a bit more substantial. However, if you go to the IWT site they will give you weights for their various trailers and you can see if there is anything which looks similar to compare with the one you have got.

And for the chassis around 200kg?

I'd have said that was about right.

Nick.

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well, the trailer I have is a homemade car trailer, with no weight stamped on it, any idea how the law stands with that? (the trailer is currently miles away so I can't take it to a weighbridge)

Didn't realise it went on the stamped weight though, that is a bit annoying!

I do plan on doing the test soon though

Thanks for the replies

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While I don't have the same towing restrictions as you - I picked up my 88" chassis on an el-cheapo un plated trailer, so this may be a way round the problem of towing weights perhaps? I would say 175 - 200 kilo's as well.

I didn't think anyone made 107 chassis anymore - out of interest - where did you buy one from?

Les.

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A previous suggestion on this forum (but I can't find the thread) was that if the chassis was fitted with the rear axle and wheels, it would still be under 750kg and could therefore be legally towed without brakes so long as a suitable trailer board, mudguards, towbar etc were attached in an appropriately secure manner.

I've seen worse things on the road....

Nick.

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Its a guy Richards Chassis put me in contact with, can't remember his name but he custom makes series 1 chassis, around a 2 year waiting list and quite a big price tag attached. He has all the dimensions for the series chassis. He is something do with the series 1 owners club too I think.

I don't think the old chassis is re-usable (it has broken into 3 pieces) :P

post-21198-0-11172800-1299619451_thumb.jpg

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Technically your towing weight is limited to either the difference between the Disco's kerb weight and 3,500kg or the kerb weight of the Disco if that is the lower number.

So say your Disco weighs 2,000kg kerb weight, you can tow 1,500kg behind it. But if it weighed 1,500kg you could not tow 2,000kg behind it. Only 1,500kg.

Remember it's the plated weight of the trailer that counts, not the actual weight. So if it's a 2,000kg MAM trailer then that's the figure you need to use. That's how I interpret the above anyway.

I did read somewhere that there was a case where the opposite was established, and the 'offender' was taken to a weighbridge for checking. But I leave that decision up to you :P

It's the MAM of the Disco, not the kerb weight that counts, so take 2,750kg away from 3,500, or for a RRC take 2,500kg from 3,500kg means you can tow a trailer plated at 1,000kg MAM (a small 2 berth caravan).

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The Direct.gov website states otherwise:

Category B vehicles may be coupled with a trailer (....) over 750kgs MAM provided the MAM of the trailer does not exceed the unladen weight of the towing vehicle, and the combination does not exceed 3.5 tonnes MAM.
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Nope, that's what I said, the combination cannot exceed 3,500kg MAM, ie the max loaded mass of the Disco, so take 3,500kg total mass and take away the MAM of the Disco at around 2,750kg (don't remember exactly) leaves very little. Without cat B+E you're better off towing with a RRC as the MAM is lower.

Of course if the trailer MAM exceeds the Disco kerbweight then it is also classed as a large trailer, but realisticaly that's a trailer of around 2,000Kg MAM so a combined mass (or Max Train Weight) of 4,750Kg MAM which clearly is above 3,500Kg limit of cat B in any case.

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Nope, that's what I said, the combination cannot exceed 3,500kg MAM, ie the max loaded mass of the Disco...

A Disco is not 3.5T MAM. It's saying the trailer and vehicle MAMs added together must not exceed 3.5T, the Disco's MAM has nothing to do with the limit, it only affects what else is left over for the trailer.

...so take 3,500kg total mass and take away the MAM of the Disco at around 2,750kg (don't remember exactly) leaves very little

Except you don't take away the MAM of the Disco, you take away the unladen weight. As quoted from the Direct.gov website itself in my post above.

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That's not how I read it. It states:

Category B vehicles may be coupled with a trailer (....) over 750kgs MAM provided the MAM of the trailer does not exceed the unladen weight of the towing vehicle, and the combination does not exceed 3.5 tonnes MAM.

To me, the 'combination' it is referring to is that of the trailer MAM and the towing vehicle's unladen weight. MAM of towing vehicle is not mentioned.

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Nooooooooooooo. **** I concede, just read the rest of the page on the website and it does appear that you are correct....

I think, anyhow. It's not clear cut, but later on it refers to the 'MAM of the combination'. Which I guess is MAM of vehicle plus MAM of trailer.

I'm going to go and do something else now, sorry all :P

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I think the conclusion to this should be, they make it @#$%ing confusing!

I think without B+E:

  • vehicle + 750kg MAM trailer, upto a combined 4.24T MAM...
    If trailer is more than 750kg...
  • Vehicle MAM + Trailer MAM is less than 3.5T
  • Trailer MAM is not more than Vehicle unladed weight

I think..... ?? :huh:

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So do I, I like the idea of hiring a pickup, or I might just go with the home made trailer with no weight stamp, then if they take me to a weigh bridge I'm under the 3.5T limit.

How many coppers do you reckon know the law :P

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I think the conclusion to this should be, they make it @#$%ing confusing!

I think without B+E:

  • vehicle + 750kg MAM trailer, upto a combined 4.24T MAM...
    If trailer is more than 750kg...
  • Vehicle MAM + Trailer MAM is less than 3.5T
  • Trailer MAM is not more than Vehicle unladed weight

I think..... ?? :huh:

I think that covers it yes, and it is a bit confusing. Also stupidly a heavier towcar can't tow as big a trailer as a small car.

.............I might just go with the home made trailer with no weight stamp, then if they take me to a weigh bridge I'm under the 3.5T limit.

How many coppers do you reckon know the law :P

I woudn't like to bet my licence on it! Without the weight stamp how can you prove you are safe? it's your responsibility to ensure that you are safe and legal, ignorance is no defense.

If you built your own trailer with bought-in components they might go off the rated braking weight of the suspension units, but you cannot ignore the C&U regs.

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A trailer made before a certain date (86 I think) does not need to be plated and may be your way around your issues however as said you still need to stick to the C&U regs i.e. if there are no brakes the total weight can only be 750kgs above that it needs working brakes and a brake away cable both trailers need a device to prevent the nose digging into the ground should it become detached and needs the correct lighting and reflectors for it's size and the tyres need to be rated for the weight carried.

Jason.

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