Jump to content

swingaway wheel carrier


Recommended Posts

Hi

Although I haven't actually taken ownership of my landie yet, I've been having a look around and was wondering....

Are swingaway wheel carriers worth fitting? I understand that they help by transferring the weight of the wheel away from the door, but in the real world, UK and Europe, does it matter/make any difference to rear door wear?

Thanks all

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMO it depends on

1. how often you open the rear door,

Open and shut it lots, may increase the likelihood of it causing damage sooner rather than later

2. what you're using you landy for,

Lots of bouncing up and down to the rear of the landy may cause damage to the door quickly

3. have you changed to bigger tyres.

This could weigh more than what the door is designed to hold, therefore causing damage sooner rather than later.

I'm sure there are other reasons but these where the first ones off the top of my head.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It depends on the condition of your door frame mainly and hinges :( . If old a worthwhile investment. :rolleyes: Mine was showing signs on the frame and would needed repairs. With support plates added to the swingaway this seem to strengthen the rear and a peace of mind :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Standard tyres at the moment, and can't see the use extending to lots of off road abuse.

Not sure, but door looks in good condition from pics and the hinges too.

Re fitting, is this a fairly straightforward D I Y job or one for someone who knows what they are doing.

I'm not bad with a spanner

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Certainly with the earlier rear doors this really was an issue and it was very common for the internal steel framework to crack even in the UK (been there, done that) but I am not certain about the latest type of door which has been completely redesigned.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've got a big 265/75 16r BFG KM2 on steel rim on my door and I open and shut the door all the time as I take the dog everywhere. My truck is a 1992 200Tdi Defender and I've not experienced any problems (so far, touch wood) and no need for the carrier. Don't think you'll need it on the TD5 right away.

What they do help with though is making your back door lighter so if you are parked on a slight slope and are trying to keep your door open, it's pretty hard to stop it from swinging shut with a load of weight on it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen many a door frame cracked - due to the spare wheel on the back door - on-road vehicles as well as off-road. I've also seen the carrier themselves cracked as well as broken. Carriers are by far the best option - if only for the peace of mind/added vehicle security with a simple lock. Adding a 3rd hinge to a door that was originally fitted with two does little to help, as the frame is still likely to crack at some point.

Les.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't realise that the carrier added security :o

3rd hinge? That isn't something I would have considered, and this might be a really silly question, but is there a right place to fix this. I mean, with regards to load bearing position, or doesn't it matter, as the mere fact you have one fitted will help due to load spreading?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We lived in a rented cottage for 18 months down the end of a long track, rutted and potholed, but used (cautiously) by ‘ordinary’ cars too. However by the time we there 12 months both the back door of my 110 CSW, and the back door of my late Wife’s 90 were trashed. All or most of the welds failed, and this with standard sized wheel / tyre combinations.

This doesn’t reflect well on Land-Rover, but the solution is to fit a separate Wheel carrier (ideally before your door gets busted) and fit a chequer plate sheet in place of the door card.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We lived in a rented cottage for 18 months down the end of a long track, rutted and potholed, but used (cautiously) by ‘ordinary’ cars too. However by the time we there 12 months both the back door of my 110 CSW, and the back door of my late Wife’s 90 were trashed. All or most of the welds failed, and this with standard sized wheel / tyre combinations.

This doesn’t reflect well on Land-Rover, but the solution is to fit a separate Wheel carrier (ideally before your door gets busted) and fit a chequer plate sheet in place of the door card.

Hi, I don't understand the connection between the door card (on the inside right?) and the swingaway carrier? What am I missing?

Thanks, Andrew.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The connection is that you need to block the holes up from the original wheel carrier. Most swingaways have some form of blanking plate that covers these holes, but may need sealing properly.

Also a chequerplate doorcard screwed into the door, properly, would provide extra torsional rigidity to the door to combat the strain on the door and welds etc.

However if a swingaway is properly installed then keeping the original door card shouldn't be a problem. (my original door card was falling apart so i fixed a mudstuff one to my door)

hope this helps

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Im definately in favour of these. Iv got a 1993 90 and Iv just replaced the door. The old one was cracked, split and in really back nick. I rebuilt the hinges too. Going to get a wheel carrier next. We've had them on Landies before and they are fantastic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Sorry should have been clearer - chequerplate doorcard screwed into the door frame counters the effect of all the busted welds."

What if you think chequerplate is the work of the devil and shouldn't be allowed anywhere near a Land Rover? :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Sorry should have been clearer - chequerplate doorcard screwed into the door frame counters the effect of all the busted welds."

What if you think chequerplate is the work of the devil and shouldn't be allowed anywhere near a Land Rover? :D

Then you get a new door and a wheel carrier. Simples.:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The connection is that you need to block the holes up from the original wheel carrier. Most swingaways have some form of blanking plate that covers these holes, but may need sealing properly.

Also a chequerplate doorcard screwed into the door, properly, would provide extra torsional rigidity to the door to combat the strain on the door and welds etc.

However if a swingaway is properly installed then keeping the original door card shouldn't be a problem. (my original door card was falling apart so i fixed a mudstuff one to my door)

hope this helps

Ah, I see, that makes sense. Cheers, Andrew

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the biggest problem is owners' tendency to slam the back door shut, compounded in many cases by oversize/overweight wheels (including Wolf rims). I have had no trouble in the ten years that my second hand door has been fitted, despite having a 7" 8-spoke and 235/85 on there throughout.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy