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mickeyw

Jacking 2014 Range Rover

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A swerve from my normal area of discussion here :)

My MD has damaged a wheel rim on his big RR, and has arranged for a wheel refurb company to repair it. Our van driver is going to ferry the wheel to the repair shop, but first we need to get the wheel off.

So, question of the day is what is the correct procedure for jacking the car, and leaving supported it without a wheel for a day or two?

I am aware that care must be exercised to lift on the correct points, and that the suspension can get confused if one doesn't do things right.

He has no jack, and no spare wheel. What kind of jack do these models have if one is supplied with the car?

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A quick update and some amusement to close this one off.

As it turns out, contrary to what the owner had reported, the car did have a spare, and a full sized one at that. In fact there was everything you need to change a wheel – jack, wheel brace, chocks, locking wheel nut key, and an owner’s manual with comprehensive instructions!

Yes we have taken the tiddle good and proper, like the merciless souls we are, and probably will continue to do so for months to come :rofl:

The 22” alloy with ZR 275/40 tyre is a massive beast to and looked to be a struggle to remove from the boot well. However there is a cleverly designed hoisting strap for helping lift the wheel up and out. If I get another chance I’ll take a photo of this, as I was impressed by its effectiveness and ease of use.

The scissor jack is no show stopper, but does at least look up to the job, as long as you’re on level ground, not that I would ever recommend doing otherwise.

The book said nothing about needing to lock the air suspension in any way, but in the interest of reducing the amount of jack winding we decided to raise the car up to full height first. For the record we had the boot open.

Having driven the car home last night he reported no upsets were caused in the suspension.

We also found that unless the boot and doors were closed we couldn’t raise the suspension height. This all makes good sense really, but always good to have proven a theory.

post-7124-0-17919400-1412770874_thumb.jpg

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I stopped next to a brand new Range Rover the other day, mine has had the air springs swapped for "sports springs", (sic), which are a little lower than norm, but the new R/R was still a good 5 inches higher, maybe 6. Much bigger than the Classic, but when you see the new one without any reference around it, they look a lot smaller. While the Classic looks bigger than it actually is.

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We also found that unless the boot and doors were closed we couldn’t raise the suspension height. This all makes good sense really, but always good to have proven a theory.

That should also be noted in the manual :) It's been that way since the P38, probably the Classic too.

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I stopped next to a brand new Range Rover the other day, mine has had the air springs swapped for "sports springs", (sic), which are a little lower than norm, but the new R/R was still a good 5 inches higher, maybe 6. Much bigger than the Classic, but when you see the new one without any reference around it, they look a lot smaller. While the Classic looks bigger than it actually is.

Today's 'full fat' Range Rover is a truly massive car, even at access height. My Classic is absolutely dwarfed next to it, and even the 110 looks a little intimidated, :lol:

Opening a door is like opening the side of a house!

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