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Hehe nice way of testing at your home :D Would also be heck of a way to pi$$ off your neighbor when the wall collapses and your landy ends up in his BBQ :D

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:D That thing is like 'Ultimate Wallfare', standard 4" bricks in front of a 4" concrete wall (might have re-bar?), leans back five degrees and has soil behind it nearly to the top and sandstone bed rock at the bottom. I don't think a D11 would push it back? The previous owners spent a small fortune on that and the garage. I guess it was done to get the work through planning? Because an underground garage is a mad thing to do otherwise?

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I have my new Gwy Lewis HD trailing arms and they are quite substantial. I'm thinking of mounting my rear shock on the top of them about 6" from the back.

Advantage: obvious and many :o)

Disadvantage; cocking around, welding, getting geometry wrong and bending one.

My initial thing is finding some fairly butch U clamp thing to grab the radius arm.

If you have an opinion, chuck it below :D

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You talking about fastening the brackets for the dampers with U bolts? As soon as your radius arm catches something your geometry is out. If you weld some sort of stop then you may as well just weld the bracket to the arm.

If that's the sort of thing you want to persue, why don't you punt your shock mounts on the inside of the chassis upside down?

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Putting the shocks on the trailing arms is going to kill your bushes I'd have thought.

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The inside of the chassis is kind of full of things. There is a lot of rear rad stuff going on. Interesting idea though :)

The rear bush would have a hard time and if I was speed racing it would have to move back. But I think I will get away with it on slow stuff?

If it's a clamp it needs to be very tough. At the moment I am thinking it needs to be billet ally.

Maybe a job for the winter.....

I'm currently making the sliding fairlead slide from the cab. That should save me hard cash in rope damage :D

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Those fancy American builds they use on King of the Hammers seem to be ok with this setup.

dsc_0167x.jpg

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Bit different to a LR trailing arm :)

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Indeed they are; but I was trying to show that the geometry is not unusual :)

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Oh I understand that, I meant that in a 'just look at the engineering' kinda way :)

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Nice set up :) The handy thing is I only want the shock there, the spring can stay as it is.

I suppose if I had been well ahead in thought I could have CNC stamped out a pair of those. But the idea wasn't there untill I saw how much stronger the new arms were.

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Oh I understand that, I meant that in a 'just look at the engineering' kinda way :)

You mean all that dodgy MIG welding ;) (sorry thread hyjack)

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Did I put a link to my jiggly wiggly Syphon?

It was six quid and it works really well :)

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=UrgELwmyKTU

Work at the moment is about straightening the left sill and bracing it underneath with inch box. Also on the go is making the sliding fairlead operate from the cab. This wasn't feasible easily until the winch re-work last year. Now it is a lot easier to pull off. And will save our legs when the going is steep.

If I can I will do a vid of it.

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Full speed ahead on van repairs, and 'full speed' ain't what it used to be 20 years ago :D

The front panel in the box had to go as the 3/8" ply is resin covered and the wood had rotted. Same for the side at the front so the first 4 foot is now 2mm ally.

Luckily Darren at work helped me loads or I would have really struggled and failed as opposed to struggled and won :)

As usual this job has hours of knock-on work from wiring to plumbing.

image_zpsetuewtkf.jpeg

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Real smart! Obviously you won't be able to use when the line is under tension, but perhaps a wiper motor with a bevelgear would allow you to?

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It would, but needing to operate it under load hasn't really been an issue over all these years, as we pretty much know how a pull is going to pan out before we start. Also, I absolutely don't have any train weight left to play with for motors or rams, which is why it has taken so long to do the mod :)

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1935 kg without the ground anchor. 

It went well yesterday. The fairlead mod went well until I bent the winch mount. I also stuffed the door and totalled the rear mudguard, but it's only an MSA - ALRC token gesture anyway. 

image_zpsuqe8ijal.jpeg

 

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I started work on the drivers side because the truck was backed into the garage. It had become time to go for the look of a normal tray back, which isn't that hard because underneath the panel work it's a tray back!

one change has been to cut out the two angle steel 'B' pillars and change them for 40 x 40 box. This is the ally tig work on the left hand side

 

IMG_1261.JPG

Edited by Team Idris

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Doesn’t look like photobucket is coming back?

here’s a very young me driving his new 4x4 build around.

built from a two door 1972 rangy it was finished in 1995.

D9553094-59D5-4048-85DA-1EB331CABE2B.jpeg

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For various reasons I am planning to unbolt the winch-challenge gear and trial it this year.

not sure of the weight saving, but it will become slightly rear-end heavy, as opposed to 30 kg nose heavy.

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