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Alloy corrosion


Anderzander
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You need dissimilar metals and some form of electrolyte between them.

As I understand it, the steel rust inhibitors usually work by creating a layer of iron phosphate on the surface that prevents further oxidation. Aluminium creates a layer of aluminium oxide on its surface when in contact with air which is itself highly resistant to corrosion.

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Alloy corrosion is generally caused by electrolytic action when moisture is present when alloy and steel are in contact, the moisture being the electrolyte connection between the two. In the 1960's when I worked at Aston Martin in Newport Pagnell the alloy hand formed panels of the DB5's and later the DB6 were separated from the stainless steel frame by a greased bandage, the existing forms of silastic were simply were not on the market in those bygone days and the slightest contact between the two metals would eventually cause corrosion on the inside of the (very expensive) panels.

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