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brake bleed tool


Cynic-al
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I've not done this personally but I have seen it done. And I'm assuming here that you have a diesel engine.

Tap into the vacuum line and fit a tee piece, this Tee would be normally blanked off when you're not bleeding your brakes.

For this operation remove the blanking plug and fit a long length of hose (use a fuel line quality hose else it will collapse) to this Tee and going to your bleed bottle, this hose (Vacuum line) goes just into the top screw-on cap of the bottle - and sealed with silicon. The bottle size wants to be about a litre, strong plastic - NOT glass.

The normal brake bleed hose goes deep into the bottle and below the fluid level - as it would normally, again seal it with silicon to make the bottle air tight.

Open the bleed nipple and start your engine and top up the main reservoir as the brake fluid is drawn out of the system.

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easybleed thingies may be better now than the old one I had, but with mine the air pressure had to be very low so the "easy" supply of air was a nuisance 'cos the tyre needed re inflating after.. also even the low pressure air seemed to blow brake fluid about the engine bay every so often.. but millions sold and used etc..

The hand held vacuum ones pull the fluid through and the second you stop squeezing is the instant the fluid stops moving so IMHO its a bit more controlled.

I bought 'er brother a sealy pressure bleeder which was quite a big version of the easy bleed but with a built in hand pump as the air supply, it looked a lot better but he never uses it so I assume its carp.

I've been bleeding brakes for thirty years and still get the odd spurt of fluid where and when I dont expect it - but with this cheapo hand held thing I've yet to drop a spot of fluid. Of course YMMV ;-)

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I use an eezi bleed at a higher pressure without any problems as long as the replacement cap is air tight the rest of the system is under a lot more pressure in normal use. with the vacuum ones surely you need to keep the reservoir topped up more often than an eezi bleed.

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I use an eezi bleed at a higher pressure without any problems as long as the replacement cap is air tight the rest of the system is under a lot more pressure in normal use. with the vacuum ones surely you need to keep the reservoir topped up more often than an eezi bleed.

I'm not saying there is anything wrong with eezy bleed, just I prefer my little vacuum one... and yes the vacuum one doesn’t over fill the reservoir leading to further spillage

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