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Just How Much Can a 110 Really Tow ?


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In my case, a 1983 110 V8 station waggon.

The book says a maximum GTW of 3.5 tonnes.

My challenge is to move a small yacht (weight 3.3 tonnes) a couple of miles. Assuming (optimistically ?) that a trailer capable of supporting 3500kg weighs about 500kg, this put me over that limit.

But, setting aside the plated limit, what can a 110 actually tow ?

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it will easily tow 5+ tonnes, have towed a Merc Unimog over 1000km on a towbar, as mentioned the previous post stopping is the problem.....luckily we rigged a pipe to the compressor in the landy for brakes.... had to be careful though, the little compressor could not produce enough air for repeated brake attempts so had to slow right down when the pressure in the mog started dropping... young and stupid..... the things you do

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It'll tow almost anything, as others say the issue is with stopping it all safely & how stable the load is once it's moving. With a good well-maintained and correctly loaded trailer that's up to the job I'd have no qualms (road-legality aside) about towing way over the 3.5 ton limit.

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Thanks all.

It's a couple of miles of Pembrokeshire lanes. Low speed but some steepish hills (up & down). Using a standard braked twin axle trailer rated for 3500kg but in good nick (as is the 110). No coupled or air brakes.

Seems like I either take a (slightly illegal but reasonably safe) punt or find a friend with a flatbed.

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If it's very short, drive it in low-box, no worse for others than being stuck behind a tractor and gives better control (esp. engine braking). If a mate can tail you in a 2nd vehicle to create breathing room it helps too.

Hypothetically, if it were legal, of course.

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In my youthful days of ignorance I towed a 12ft plant trailer full of track ballast with my mother's 90 turbo D.

Two of us loaded it by hand, and I was somewhat oblivious to the potential weight, but it needed low range to get it all moving, and certainly not legal for the 8 mile trip, oops. Fortunately the trip was completed without drama, other than a few rolling low to high range shifts.

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I rescued a stranded, six ton horse truck (TK Bedford) with a standard Series 3 88" many years ago. It needed a hill start too! The basic Land Rover chassis is very robust. The most obvious restriction is, as others mentioned, the brakes. Less obvious is the transmission strain. A random broken half shaft a few weeks later almost certainly was caused by the tow. (It was a bit of an emergency - the truck engine had died on a near blind corner and it was losing brake air pressure. The quick tow was the best call.)

I'm not sure a 110 chassis is any stronger than a Series but the drive train is and the brakes muuuuuch better!

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As you live in the UK - I think it just stops at 3.5 tonnes. Get a truck to do it - just not worth it.

Here, France, we have the option of using different attachments (like mini truck jaws) and air brakes to go to 4.5 or 5 tonnes. However, it is not fun. We have a 4.5 tonne trailer and loaded to 3.5 tonnes, the 300 Tdi really needs to work and stopping on the hills is just not very.... relaxing.

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As previously said by all the others – It’s not the getting it going that is the problem, its keeping the load under control, not letting it get away from you downhill, losing braking, and not letting it push you over on a corner with adverse camber, and so on.

Keep in low box, keep the speed down, get in the right gear before hills (up or down) and so on.

I’ve done this with 3 trucks, an extra on the front to help with the uphill sections, (and keep the nose of the truck pointing in the right direction) and a truck on the back to help with the braking downhill (and keep the trailer rolling in the right direction – by holding it back on the bends)

When I say “I’ve done this” I should clarify that I was drove the rear truck, and very much was the ‘Junior’ member of this team. (I should also say this wasn't in the UK, and they were not Land-Rovers)

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VERY important, learned this from an old greybeard, if you intend on towing in a hilly terrain with a land rover that doesn't have a V8 in (I can hear the ****storm coming now already from this comment!!).... then it is imperative to cut cardboard pieces that cover the front lights and stick them on firmly.

this way your landy cannot see the hill coming and will not slow down in advance...... giving you a better fighting chance on the hills..

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I have (as others my have in agriculture) been involved in a few tows that were a little on the heavy side, one off we had a pull and push tractor. The one in front pulled up hill and the rear one pushed, bumper to bumper with the trailer. Down hill it was the other way around. This requires short tow straps, and much care and attention.

Towing a 3.3 ton boat on a 0.2 ton trailer would be possible but a traiper that light would not be rated to enough. Borrow a tractor if it's a short distance. On a standard b+e, I believe you can tow a total train weight of 24t with a tractor (assuming trailer is properly rated) I could be wrong with this though so double check (I have just got back from the pub after all!)

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I have (as others my have in agriculture) been involved in a few tows that were a little on the heavy side, one off we had a pull and push tractor. The one in front pulled up hill and the rear one pushed, bumper to bumper with the trailer. Down hill it was the other way around. This requires short tow straps, and much care and attention.

Towing a 3.3 ton boat on a 0.2 ton trailer would be possible but a traiper that light would not be rated to enough. Borrow a tractor if it's a short distance. On a standard b+e, I believe you can tow a total train weight of 24t with a tractor (assuming trailer is properly rated) I could be wrong with this though so double check (I have just got back from the pub after all!)

I believe B+E has nothing to do with it when it comes to tractors. The standard tractor category (F?) that everyone with a car license has got includes a tractor and trailer/implement up to 24 tonnes. So no requirement for extra tests.

And that weight limit has recently gone up to 31t! https://www.gov.uk/government/news/farmers-get-62-million-yearly-boost-as-tractor-weight-and-speed-limits-increased

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Tow that weight no trouble , when you get above about 8ton train weight then depending on how good the trailer brakes are you need to allow more stopping distance. Ive towed 54 tonne on a bar with 110v8 csw over a mile and was pulling easy at 30mph in that distance low range start and the truck did the braking into a layby (In australia) . Years ago with a 109 (3.8L Diesel) and tri axle trailer did Dagenham to Oxford at 7.5tonn train . Not pushing the speed thing is the crux of it . JMHO

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Technically, your half shafts will snap pulling 7 Tons (minus vehicle weight and not accounting for roll resistance) up a 1:1 slope (50% more for hardened shafts). Your tow ball will break off at about 40 Tons up a 1:1 slope.

On a more normal say 1:5 (steep hill) it should be able to pull up to about 20 Ton - so say 15 ton accounting for roll resistance & vehicle weight.

Don't try this at home kids!

Si

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