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hydraulic cable crimper


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I have had mine about 18 months, in that time I've maybe used it ten times? But at least five of them were oddball uses that hoisted me right out of the ****. A very handy tool to have.

Will.

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I bought one on the back of another thread here - and although it feels cheaply made (there's a reason for that!) It's been surprisingly good and produces better crimps than my much more expensive lever arm crimpers.

Si

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Well just did a buy now on the bat, £38 blue and black one, looked a bit sturdier than the 26 quid ones and only a bit more so hey ho.

Looking forward to tyding up the battery cables now just to make it a bit neater in there ;)

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A cracking investment given the price. i used to use one of these regularly for marine battery cables, big and small and they always gave a good crimp.
As Boydie mentioned, solder as-well if possible and if you want a really pro looking finish, a bit of adhesive heat shrink over the top works a treat

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post-15547-0-00584700-1430684541_thumb.jpg

This is the one I bought, seller only had x3 at this price and this is the last one he had. I just put "Hydraulic cable crimper" in the ebay search. Quite a selection and the 8 ton are pretty reasonable on price I thought?

So for say 32mm sq. battery cable what size adhesive shrink tube should I get?

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Why solder? . Manufacturers of millions of cars don't do it and very rarely do they fail.

A mechanical crimp joint does not need soldering, i've been building looms and modifying looms throughout my career and soldering in my view is to cover a poor crimp, if you want to add anything to a crimp joint then use top quality heatshrink

The soldering process itself can damage other components from heat.
There is a 'spark-gap' condition at large gauge soldered wire connections, where the heat generated by the solder's resistance could be enough to melt the insulation or set it on fire.
Wires tend to flex near soldered joints, increasing the chances of breakage and corrosion, particularly after heating. Heat causes wire embrittlement, strand fatigue and corrosion.

A soldered joint is inferior, where wires are 'stuck' together, while a crimped or welded joint is the equivalent effusing the metal. With a soldered joint, there is only minimal contact between the wires themselves, and the main electrical path is through the solder (which has more resistance than the copper of the wire). Though crimping effectively reduces the cross-section of a wire by about 20 percent, the small resistance added amounts to an essentially unimpeded electric flow across the crimped joint."

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Supaimpy is right!

The main issue around all joints is fatigue where the wire enters the joint (the most flexible bit between the cable insulation & the terminal). You can help this with heat-shrink or even better, glue filled heat-shrink.

We can't help you choose a size of heat shrink as we don't know the size of your cable or terminals - just pick the smallest which will easily fit over the cable and connector post crimping. Good quality (Hellerman, 3M) tends to shrink more than most of the other stuff and has superior UV resistance.

Si

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I bought the yellow/black for £24 , i crimped a 25 CCT to test and the crimp looked good and neat too. I put the terminal in a vice and pulled the cable out quite easily. I got a refund anyway as some dies were missing. Rubbish in my experience.

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Why solder? . Manufacturers of millions of cars don't do it and very rarely do they fail.

A mechanical crimp joint does not need soldering, i've been building looms and modifying looms throughout my career and soldering in my view is to cover a poor crimp, if you want to add anything to a crimp joint then use top quality heatshrink

The soldering process itself can damage other components from heat.

There is a 'spark-gap' condition at large gauge soldered wire connections, where the heat generated by the solder's resistance could be enough to melt the insulation or set it on fire.

Wires tend to flex near soldered joints, increasing the chances of breakage and corrosion, particularly after heating. Heat causes wire embrittlement, strand fatigue and corrosion.

A soldered joint is inferior, where wires are 'stuck' together, while a crimped or welded joint is the equivalent effusing the metal. With a soldered joint, there is only minimal contact between the wires themselves, and the main electrical path is through the solder (which has more resistance than the copper of the wire). Though crimping effectively reduces the cross-section of a wire by about 20 percent, the small resistance added amounts to an essentially unimpeded electric flow across the crimped joint."

To be fair though, as long as the cable is sized accordingly, the slight extra resistance offered by the solder shouldn't be a problem. Especially for an automotive application.

Nothing whatsoever wrong with a well soldered joint on a cable/connector that isn't going to be continually bent/moved around.

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Well the 8T hydraulic crimper has just arrived!... 1st. Impression is it looks and feels sturdy/well made, strong moulded box and a pack of spare O rings.... So out to the shed to give it a try out as i have a bit of battery cable and a terminal spare.... Now ok the terminal was a little big but crimped better than i could have hoped for! No chance of it pulling apart!

And yes it's made in China! But really dont care as it will do a job more than fine, just need to play with it now to get the best results.... The name of it is Zupper, never heard of them but this bit of kit looks like it will last a while ie wont fall to bits in the box.

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Solder vs Crimping.

If, as indicated in the video on page 2 of this thread, the connection and cable are crimped in such a fashion so that the wire strands are hexagonal and there are zero air gaps, then yes, there is no need to solder, if however there are air gaps due to incorrect sized mandrill jaws, poorly made connections or poor application of the tool, connector and or cable then soldering is the only option to ensure a perfect joint. For a good professional finish I would always advise using a heat shrink sleeve over the cable and connection to eliminate the possibility of moisture penetration as well as obvious electrical insulation.

Interesting to note that Boeing don't solder any of their commercial aircraft joints, they are all crimped, they do however test EVERY section of wiring harness a MINIMUM of four times for continuity and heat generation (using mega testing and infer-red spectrums) as the sections of harness are connected to each other before the aircraft is placed into service for it's test flight. A tad more than Land Rover or anyone of us would do.

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