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Top speed / light slope speed dropping


xychix
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Hey I've got a Transit 2.5di (non turbo manual pump) and a series III 109 on 7.50/16R (the standard as far as I know)

Light slopes in middle france pose no problem to the transit at all, only a few longer heavier slopes will require me to gear to 4th or even 3rd.

Hoever my series III 2.25di seems to be dropping speed as soon as it sees a slope.

Top speed on nice long flat road seems ~50 Mph (~80-85 km/h) and up a slope it will drop to ~30 Mph forcing me into 3rd for every light slope.

Is this normal behaviour for a 2.25di? Anything I can do to make it pull better?

It has original oil-airfilter and the brake vacuum valve is in place.

Will replace the brake vacuum with a electric Hella up28 pump (from a volvo) somewhere soon.

I have no need for a higher top speed as te steering (even while tighened up) is crappy and sloppy, it would just be nice not to drop down that much on a silly slope.

It might even be a physical issue that prevents me from fully openeing the throttle..... ?? just a thought.

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Should pull 4000RPM - which for a LWB is about 65 - my 109 would - I didn't keep it there for long but 55 or so was a comfortable cruise wihout overdrive.

Steering should be light and surprisingly positive - even on 235x85x16 tyres. It shouldn't wander or be difficult to get round corners.

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Should pull 4000RPM - which for a LWB is about 65 - my 109 would - I didn't keep it there for long but 55 or so was a comfortable cruise wihout overdrive.

Steering should be light and surprisingly positive - even on 235x85x16 tyres. It shouldn't wander or be difficult to get round corners.

means I have some work then...

the steer play is quite big even after adjusting it to the max (before the wheel starts turning to heavy)

I dont have a RPM counter I believe :) does make some RPM but not in forth!

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Assuming all the simple stuff is good - fuel filter , lift pump , tank breather , throttle linkage is giving fully open ( and the engine stop is fully off ) I'd be advancing

the inj. pump a bit and seeing what it drives like . There are slots in the base of the IP housing and a plate on the side showing rotation direction - from memory

it's anti-clockwise , so turn the body clockwise , loosen the inj. pipes to allow movement . When it's right you will notice the engine should have a slight "diesel knock" on revving up and you may also have a little black smoke out on the road accelerating . Going out of timing is usually due to wear in the skew gear driving

the IP off the camshaft .

hope this helps

Steveb

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Check the realy arms are TIGHT - they often come loose. Relay needs oil - and should be smooth and not sticky when the ball joints are off. They're often siezed and have no oil. Tracking is very important as well. If its out the thing will steer badly.

When I bought my 109 I was so frightened about driving it (MOT was a few days old!) that I abandoned it at home and drove it to my workshop at 6am on Sunday morning. When I sold it the steering was nice, light and true - which was only due to adjustement and lubrication.

Also checking that the hub swivels are free and haven't siezed.

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I had a 109 2.25 diesel and it hit the governor at around 60 m.p.h.. It held that easily, even up a slight slope. A slightly bigger slope would kill it though - they don't produce that much power. Sounds like you are definitely down on power and there's plenty of advice above on what to do. Personally, I'd replace all my filters and check I had full throttle travel before tinkering with the pump and timing, mainly 'cos I'm lazy and don't like making work for myself without good reason!

Is your steering that bad? If you've come from a modern car with rack and pinion, very direct steering, a Land Rover can feel a little vague, plus they do move a little left and right on bumpy roads due to the geometry of the linkages. We all get so used to it that we don't even notice it. Having said that, there are a lot of points at which play can develop (wheel bearings, swivels, tie rod ends, steering relay, drop arm, steering box), making for quite a dance as you go up the road.

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..

Is your steering that bad? If you've come from a modern car with rack and pinion, very direct steering, a Land Rover can feel a little vague, plus they do move a little left and right on bumpy roads due to the geometry of the linkages. We all get so used to it that we don't even notice it. Having said that, there are a lot of points at which play can develop (wheel bearings, swivels, tie rod ends, steering relay, drop arm, steering box), making for quite a dance as you go up the road.

I come from a Ford Transit mk5 2.5di, not exactly a race master. However when I approach a ~3.5 meter wide bridge on a small road I tend to brake to ~40 km/h to make sure I can get it over :im-ok-smiley-emoticon:

With my transit I'd likely keep driving 80 km/h (or whatever I was driving before)

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  • 3 weeks later...

For steering play, check all six rod ends for wear and replace any that have even slight play. Tighten the pinch bolts ont he steering relay arms (both) and check for movement bewteen the swivel arms and swivel housings as someone rocks the steering wheel - the four studs holding the arm to the housing can wear and tin down, allowing motion there. Remove the top swivel pins for inspection and replace if there is any wear, along with their Railko bushes int he chrome housings. Make sure the relay is oiled and secure in the chassis (the bottom collar should be checked for integrity and play). Tighten the steering box only finger tight with the steering straight - any tighter and you'll cause wear or fracture of the rocker. Check the end plates of the steering box are on tight (four bolts each) to ensure there is no endfloat on the steering column.

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