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metalmad

1960 Austin Gipsy Resurrection

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Hi guys / girls,

Been in negotiations to acquire a 1960 Austin Gipsy pickup...its in a sorry state so will require some serious work to get it back to even "work vehicle" standard. Looking to build something that is driveable on modern roads, that I can use to move stuff around - garden waste, DIY materials etc rather than a car show ornament...

However the 2.2 diesel currently in it is far too slow for my liking (top speed 55 and about a week to get there plus the engine is getting difficult to find parts for), and the current keeper has indicated an interest in the engine and gearbox for a vintage generator project or similar.

So does anyone have any suggestions for a suitable engine/gearbox/transfer case combo?

So far considered

1. Small block chevy / Rover V8 - mated to something like an nv4500 or other suitable box and transfer case (If I was still living in Canada I'd probably go for an NP205/203 - problems - bad mpg, cost of acquisition, positives...power...lots of power..

2. Fiat 1.9 150 diesel (have one in another vehicle so I'm aware of its foibles and have the tools to work on it / tune it) I just have no idea off the top of my head of a gearbox that would mate to it (its usually fitted transeverse and I'd be looking to rotate it so it was longitudinal)

3. Drivetrain out of something like a Frontera - advantage already 4WD, relatively cheap to acquire and parts supply good

4. ?? Suggestions ??

Thanks :)

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200/300tdi, lt77/r380 and lt230 length is variable depending on combo, cheap/plentiful probably same output flanges.

Just my two pence worth.

Mike

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Mike:

Cheers for that, will give you a like when forum software permits me to :)

Might look into a 200/300TDI, heard 200TDIs are simpler to work on, but more maintenance intensive...

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You must be trying to live up to the second part of your forum name . every item on that vehicle must be almost impossible to get ,

they were known for rusting when they were new, be far easier to fiddle about with a landrover. Has it got steel springs or the flexitor suspension? The whole production run was only for a period of about 10 years . Good luck :)

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You must be trying to live up to the second part of your forum name . every item on that vehicle must be almost impossible to get ,

they were known for rusting when they were new, be far easier to fiddle about with a landrover. Has it got steel springs or the flexitor suspension? The whole production run was only for a period of about 10 years . Good luck :)

I am slighly mad to a degree...quite a few bits are still available (shared with other austins of the era...) Not committed yet, looking to do a modernisation rather than a restoration...

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From what I've heard they're very tight for space under the skin, silly long procedures to get the prop shafts out from under the car.

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From what I've heard they're very tight for space under the skin, silly long procedures to get the prop shafts out from under the car.

lol feel at home then...my Daily driver (Saab 9-3) has next to no space under the bonnet, getting stuff off, often involves scraped hands or dismantling vast amounts of stuff...

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Stop raining on his parade! We don't do things because they are easy ;)

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I'm guessing you have flexitor for a 1960 as the leafs didn't come out till after.

I put a P76V8 in mine and limited slip Nissan diffs. It ran the quarter mile in 16 seconds with the original gearbox and transfer case.

For me the biggest problem is the wheels falling off followed closely by the ten inch drums if you do go faster. I never actually had the wheels come off but the setup's quite scary. The rear would be easy to sort out but the front is the problem. I gave up on mine in the end as I couldn't think of a way of keeping some originality and something that worked at the same time.

If you do have a later vehicle with leafs then there's no dramas at all, just fit what you like. The transfer case is really easy to turn into a three stick case where you can disengage either the front or rear drive in high or low to suit the terrain. Very unusual and also very strong and well up to American V8's.

P8220049.jpg

P8220062.jpg

P8220056.jpg

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I'm guessing you have flexitor for a 1960 as the leafs didn't come out till after.

I put a P76V8 in mine and limited slip Nissan diffs. It ran the quarter mile in 16 seconds with the original gearbox and transfer case.

For me the biggest problem is the wheels falling off followed closely by the ten inch drums if you do go faster. I never actually had the wheels come off but the setup's quite scary. The rear would be easy to sort out but the front is the problem. I gave up on mine in the end as I couldn't think of a way of keeping some originality and something that worked at the same time.

If you do have a later vehicle with leafs then there's no dramas at all, just fit what you like. The transfer case is really easy to turn into a three stick case where you can disengage either the front or rear drive in high or low to suit the terrain. Very unusual and also very strong and well up to American V8's.

P8220049.jpg

P8220062.jpg

P8220056.jpg

Hmm thats got me thinking now

I'm tempted to retain the transfer case and swap the gearbox and engine.

Need to do some research to see if the final drive diff ratios differ between the diesel and petrol gipsys (I know my Wrangler YJ had different diff ratios depending on the motor fitted)

Why do it...tax exempt, electrically simple, minimal stuff for the mot tester to look at, plus its....quirky....

Why no landy...well regionally...people want daft cash for stuff thats more holes and rust than solid metal...(still kicking myself I didn't buy that long term garaged Series 3 for £500 that was advertised about 6 years ago locally...)...saw someone asking £2500 for a disco 2 with no mot, bald tyres and a LONG list of work needing done to it...

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I wonder what if anything would stop someone getting rid of the flextor, and fitting coil springs and shocks..., should just be a matter of welding on suitable mounts and measuring to make sure the geometry isn't too far off...would open up a few possibilities...

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Anything's possible if you chuck enough time and money at it.

Keeping the end result within the rules for modified vehicles might be a bit more of a challenge though.

Engine wise, why go for a tiny diesel, seems some of us here have had success with 3 litre offerings from Mercedes and BMW, I'd be looking there and getting something with good potential for power/torque and usability.

Add in that six cylinders have to be better than four, and you can only conclude you should do it.

As for the body rot? Brush up on your sheet metalwork, and invest in a Plasma cutter.

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Mike:

Cheers for that, will give you a like when forum software permits me to :)

Might look into a 200/300TDI, heard 200TDIs are simpler to work on, but more maintenance intensive...

to be honest, theres nothing between them despite what poeple say. all i would say is the 200 in general (but not always) runs a little rougher than the 300.

the serpentine belt system and the fact that you don't have to break into the coolant system to replace the timing belt IMO are a bonus on the 300 engine. the 200 supposedly has a "stronger" head less likely to blow the gasket and overheat but i can't see why the 300 is any different. it is effectively almost identical in terms of major component design.

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But the mian reason for 200/300 popularity is it's an easy drop-in conversion for many 4-cyl Land Rovers - otherwise it's an obsolete engine, all of the available ones being quite long in the tooth now. If you're not starting with a 4cyl land rover it may not make much sense compared to any number of other engines out there.

The Isuzu 2.8 is IMHO nicer than a 2/300TDi (and pokier) whilst being very compact. The Merc OM606 Dirtydiesel's putting in in another thread has a lot going for it. I'd like to see someone use the TD4 from a freelander, that's a great lump used in many BMW/Rover and in the FL it gains a VNT. You wouldn't want one in a full size RR (think Disco MPi) but in something of similar weight to a FL (~1600kg) it should be lovely. A lot will be dictated by the size & shape of the engine bay, no point suggesting a straight 6 if it's more suited to a Subaru flat-4.

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..... the 200 supposedly has a "stronger" head less likely to blow the gasket and overheat but i can't see why the 300 is any different. it is effectively almost identical in terms of major component design.

A 300 is more likely to overheat as the water pump is higher so the coolant level has to drop less before the pump is dry and then it overheats, perhaps people just jump to the conclusion it's the head that causes them to overheat more?

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Mods to my gipsy. A 1966 LWB SE G15.

Originally petrol. Have used for 35 years. Now completely rebuilt and regular use in north devon.

Mods :- Daihatsu 2.8 TDI using Daihatsu intercooler, modified. Nice smooth old tech diesel.

Brakes are 11 inch std drums. However split circuit with LR S3 pedal box and 7 inch servo.

BMW 5 series ZF steering box rotated 90 degrees and drop arm now straightened. Lovely steering now.

Parabolic springs and std Gipsy axles. Handbrake now uses LR Defender brake cable.

Stainless exhaust.

Looks entirely std from outside.

Tows really well

Have LR Defender only 50k. Damn gearbox broke, lay shaft snapped I think. Not doing anything tough.

LR should have cured their box weakness after 60 years but seems not. You will not break a Gipsy good and transfer box.

Boza

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Interesting Project !

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You must be trying to live up to the second part of your forum name . every item on that vehicle must be almost impossible to get ,

they were known for rusting when they were new, be far easier to fiddle about with a landrover. Has it got steel springs or the flexitor suspension? The whole production run was only for a period of about 10 years . Good luck :)

And the reason production stopped in 1968 was that Leyland (I.e. Land Rover) took over BMC and immediately stopped the Gipsy production. Not a thing was learned from the Gipsy. Take for example the gear box and transfer box, far superiors and virtually up breakable. Compare with my TD5 Defender of just 50 k - major gear box failure and major hole in pocket. The Gipsy transfer box has rear wheel drive, front wheel drive, four wheel drive, high and low ratio plus PTO, All can be engaged and disengaged on the move as clutch less change. Also PTO on main gearbox for hydraulic or air pump.

Add to this a more rust resistant chassis, and beam axle articulation on the later series IV models that gives 19 inches rise and fall per wheel. LWB HAS TURNING CIRCLE ONLY 1 foot bigger than modern SWB Defender. Steering that is direct and accurate too. No wonder LR stopped it it was gaining on them fast.

Boza

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Nice Boza, got any pictures?

Go to tractorstories4children.co.uk. Pictures there.

Boza

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I had a break down truck Gypsy petrol never let me down missed it many times, there was a few in te scrappers at the time I ad it early 80's nice drive and unusual even then, is there a owners forum etc ? good luck nice to be different.

 

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OM 605 would be nice - hard as nails loads of grunt, very fuel efficient, not too long

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