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spiker3
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V8 on gas!

The TD5 is a great engine but if the D2 V8 comes LPG ready the actual cash costs running are the same.

one note for the future is that these emission zones are springing up everywhere over here, maybe not yet on the island but some cities have already banned diesels pre 2003 on emissions basis.

Besides, nothing better than a V8 rummble to accompany you on any drive :D

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  • 4 weeks later...

Depends if it has an auto or a manual box fitted. The TD5 is a lovely drive, but with auto and without super careful driving, expect 25mpg average. It's a weak engine prone to a large number of issues. The 4.0 Thor is stifled on power due to emissions controls and runs hot (again due to emissions controls). It's not as quick as a standard manual TD5. But it's relatively strong with good servicing and still simple.

Avoid air suspension - it's better than springs and once set up can be reliable. Note the 'can'. There are a number of major design flaws that need to be sorted with retrograde parts to avoid big expense.

ACE is superb but check it well - it's expensive

Door hinges, window seals, leaks, window motors, bearings, chassis rust, more chassis rust, cooling - all rads, air con feed pipes, weak gearboxes (manual and auto)

But I love mine. Between me and the last two owners we have spent enough to buy a five year old D4, but its just such a nice vehicle to drive. Mine's a TD5 Auto ES Premium, with ALL the bells and whistles. It's 'chipped' and had the auto-box optimised to suit the 'chip'. The 'chip' is to produce better mid range and low range response - not high range. It was done by the previous owner to suit his caravan. I've had a top end re-build done by my local engine specialist, with a check for head porosity. The previous owner had a bottom end re-build done after in response to a grumble from the nether regions. It's had a new Auto-box, engine cooling system, radiators, ACE pipes and Pump, air con, oil cooler, rear diff, discs, pads, hubs, shocks, 2x compressors, bags, pipes, intake, fuel pump, window winders X 3, rear door hinges, door seals, CD player, turbo, exhaust manifold, EGR replacement kit, front prop, PS pump and some other stuff I forget. It's now passed 154k miles.

It gets an oil change every 5k without fail, at the same time it gets filters all round. The front prop now has greasable UJ's - all grease is done every 3k. Auto-box filters every 30k, ALL other oils every 15k. It never gets thrashed - herself drives it. It does 70 miles a day during the week; mainly motorway with four people in.

The best I have ever had out of it was 31mpg, the worst was about 19mpg...

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Sorry Honiton hobbit,whilst I agree with some of your observations,I cant agree with others.The v8 is not hot running "due to emissions" That was total carp, published by companies who were selling stuff which gave them an advantage to make those statements.Its easy to disprove,I did it years ago when I was spending plenty of time setting up LPG systems on them.

The TD5 is an excellent engine,capable of withstanding huge amounts of miles and thrashing.What they don't like is cracked heads,or abuse that quickly leads to bent conrods etc. But unlike the 94mm bore v8's they are generally rebuildable.(Within a reasonable budget) The problem with the v8's is that there is 8 of most things to buy or machine,stepped liners being the worst cost.If a TD5 is stopped in time needing a new head for £1200 plus labour, then it might get repaired. A v8 needing a stepped liner short block is way more,most owners just scrap them then.Big shame in my opinion,not what Landrovers are supposed to be about...

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Made I laugh - always one who has to disagree.

Okay so lets put it this way. SOME people believe that the inherent over heating issues with the majority of Rover V8's after the 3.9 and especially those equipped with the Thor set up are due to being set up to run lean, so as to get emission approval in the US of A. SOME don't. I don't really care. I have in my obviously limited experience, that I don't really rate the 4.0ltr engine in the D2 as it is, in my experience somewhat gutless. Whereas the 4.6 fitted in the D2 is much nicer. This judgement was acquired whilst driving D2's for a living. Not fitting LPG kits or running a tuning business. I have driven a 4.2 lump with top hats in a D2. It was nice.

I've also driven the odd TD5 D2 (and Defender) as well as fixing the odd one for a living. I stand by the points I made, although they may need some re-writing to provide better detail.

I didn't mention that I love the D3/D4 V8. It's a hoot. It's not as bad fuel wise as the TDV6 and has such smooth power delivery... A manual would be nice. As a vehicle, it's pig ugly and looks like a Ford Connect on steroids. It has the most appalling service requirements yet devised by LR. My opinions only, not copied from others or from the internet. No doubt someone will fell the need to whinge about it, or point out that the D3 has one design awards or bets towing car in the universe... Again, I am not wearing my caring face.

I would strongly advise that the OP goes out and drives a few, talks to a few independent garages, maybe talks to a few owners - but not on line. Avoid Forums, avoid Facebook! Make a decision without any form of social media...

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Hobbit,maybe I should apologise, maybe not... The OP asked a question,which is best to buy or drive,to which the answer will always be an opinion,I commented on your statement about Rover V8's running hot due to running lean. This is wrong,a fact - not an opinion and if you knew your stuff, you would know that NAS spec engines had different emissions equipment on them anyway and ran different software to control it.

The problem with 94mm bore Rovers is that there simply isn't reliably enough metal to support the liners,plus the quality control of their fitting,(Along with the rest of the engine) left alot to be desired.So it wasn't ever going to be 100% reliable,whatever fuel system it ran.

The lean cruise conditions which were blamed upon LR could only cycle withing a narrow range either side of Lambda an air,fuel ratio of 14.7/1. It could only do this - the same as any other closed loop petrol of the time,because they only had narrow band sensors. Different situation now, the programmers could be as cruel as they like with the wideband sensors in common use now.

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True. My Bro-in-Law lives in Aus. He hired a Harley 1948 last time hew was over. The tank was minute... Something like 1 gallon (not sure really - it was a Harley, I wouldn't even let him leave it on the drive). He was pondering just how the hell Harley would sell the same bike in Aus. It would do just over 100 miles to a tank if ridden steady...

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Dammit, I thought I was going to have to moderate something for a moment, then you had a group hug and made up! :)

FWIW I ran a D2 4.0 V8 for 13 years until a few months ago and as far as I remember it never missed a beat and the only maintenance was a couple of viscous fan couplings and re-sealing the sump a couple of times. In the same time most of the Td5s of a similar age had at least one engine change....

You couldn't do it over there but when I first got the D2 there was only leaded fuel here. After some research I disconnected the oxygen sensors, which forces the EFI system to open-loop fuelling. Ran like a dream and still does.

The replacement 3.2 Shogun is probably quicker than the V8, but illustrates the difference between a 'motor car' and an 'automobile'. There's nothing wrong with it but I won't be keeping it 13 years, and I don't drive it in the rain with the window open and the radio off.

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The V8's are getting their own back on me... I have one TD5 engine in bits for a complete rebuild after cracked head,ran away on its own fuel/oil. Another TD5 in last night with a cracked head on #4 injector.Luckily caught before it ran away and did more damage. Lastly another TD5 with its head gasket leaking coolant all down the left side of the block.

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This thread had me scratching my head, so I did some maths. I worked out what it might cost, here in New Zealand, to run a TD5 or a V8 over 100,000 miles, just in terms of fuel and road tax costs (it's hard to keep track of what the tea leaf readers at motor reg are up to over any sort of time period). I assumed a lot of town running and maybe some off-road, rather than all being at optimal speed on a wide open road. Turns out you could save around $NZ24,000 (~12,000 pounds, give or take) by driving the TD5. That would allow a fair bit for extra servicing etc.!

That saving translates to being able to buy two or three extra Discovery 2s over that period (around four or five years for me). A free car every two years?

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