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Release bearings


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Currently doing some pro-active maintenance on my 90 and changing the clutch as the car has now done 100k in my ownership and there's no record of when it was last done before then. Figured I'd rather do it at a time of my choosing rather than it fail me somewhere inconvenient.

So 'whipped' the engine out and set about removing the various bits. There was some quite bad wear on the clutch plate fingers:

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So probably not a bad thing it's being changed, though seemingly plenty of life in the friction plate. I also noticed the release bearing was a different construction to the new one:

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Old one on the tyre, new one in position in the bellhousing.

Is this a different style of bearing, or is something missing from the old one? I presume they are functionally the same, they seem to be dimensionally the same anyway.

Just want to make sure I don't need to obtain some other type of bearing before putting it all back together again!

Cheers

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Looking at the old bearing I think the inner race is missing which would explain the wear on the spring blades which is far from normal, even for a high milage clutch. Some early release bearing designs had a carbon "race" which would gradually wear away. Perhaps this was such a bearing, I know that Ford used these but I'm not sure about Land Rover, perhaps it's an aftermarket unit.

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The old bearing looks like a Valeo, the new one AP. I think they are different interpretations of the same thing. I have just put in a M& D clutch (by AP) in place of a busted Valeo and the bearings look like those. The Valeo bearing despite being smaller was perfectly serviceable still unlike the clutch plate. I don't think anything is missing from the old bearing, you would have seen it in the bell housing or it would have been rattling on the spigot shaft.

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Looking at the old bearing I think the inner race is missing which would explain the wear on the spring blades which is far from normal,

I disagree, it's common, much more so on people who ride the clutch or leave it depressed for long periods of time. Altho not LR, 110k and only changed as it was heavy, release bearing was fine.

post-30771-0-07219900-1447793831_thumb.jpeg

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Oh dear,

Landy Novice, just think about it for a moment. If the thrust bearing is in good condition the bearing outer race of the bearing will rotate at the same speed at the tangs on the spring (flywheel) when they came into contact with each other and little to no wear would take place. If however the thrust bearing is in worn, or has become dry with no lubrication ( a plague on "sealed for life bearings" :angry2: ) then the bearing outer race will either not spin or will have friction resistance and will spin slower than the flywheel and the tangs will therefore become worn.

Wear of this nature on the tangs IS NOT normal, it indicates that there is a problem with the thrust bearing. The problem may well be, as you said, due to excessive clutch use and therefore causing the bearing to overheat and use up all it's "high temperature grease" lubricant and run dry but in "normal" applications there should be little if any erosion of the spring tangs.

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The mad rabbit may well be right, there are very few traffic jams out my way and I never ride the clutch other than hill starts. In fact Julie and I mutter "bloody traffic" if we so much as see another vehicle during the 6 weeks we get away annually into the desert but it your traffic is that bad, and you are getting that degree of wear then you should be looking to replace your thrust bearings and/or clutch assy on a more regular basis.

I would also be looking long and hard at the make and style and manufacturing quality of the bearing you install and certainly not using one out of a "blue bag".

My Disco has dome well over 180,000 k's on this heavy duty clutch assembly and there is only a trace contact mark on the tines.

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Thanks gents. It's all back together now. New bearing was a Bearmach supplied 'RHP' branded one, not the Britpart cheapo! Seemed good to my untrained eye, though it is less free spinning than the old one. The old bearing had a lot of play side-to-side which can't have been doing it any favours. New clutch is a Valeo item (the 130 spec one that is generally fitted), old one was marked Borg and Beck as well as AP. Also changed the clutch fork and slipper pads for good measure.

Will see how it all works once the vehicle is back together at the end of the week.

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Don't be concerned about it not spinning freely, the bearing is packed with high temperature grease and will give a degree of turning resistance and it's a good sign that there is grease encased in the bearing, once it's installed it will very quickly free up with use.

If it span easily I would be taking it back to the supplier!

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Well it's all working fine I am glad to say.

Amazed how light the clutch is now, I was a bit concerned that using the 130/HD spec friction plate and cover would make the pedal heavier but quite the opposite - it's light as a feather compared to before. And no more creaking from the bellhousing either... happy days :)

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the pressure cover is common to both 200 & 300tdi engines & the older TD, the only part that changes is the friction plate, 130HD has 8 damper springs standard factory fit has 6 damper springs & some non genuine have 4 larger damper springs

just been through the 90/110 parts book ----------

2.5 n/a,TD, 200Tdi & 300Tdi friction plate - factory original fit = FTC2149

Alternative when fitted in 130 models is heavy duty FTC1994 now UQB000130

presuure cover = FTC575 now URB100760 for all the above engines.

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