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ejparrott

Radically altered vehicles - lost points

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Yes, if pulled it's down to the owner to prove they did the conversions before 1998

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I went with a friend to get his kit car (Lotus 7 style kit not Land Rover but the test is the same) SVA'ed a few years ago and it was pretty simple provided you though about things as you built it, He failed on a couple of minor items which were fixed in and hour then retested that day.

In my opinion the test is a good thing for radically altered vehicles, most people will build things well and if mostly standard or well made components are used and a bit of though used in the cab you should have no problems. Most issues are likely to be due to sharp angles on things which can be removed or covered with a bit of though. Once you have passed you have the peace of mind of an independantly tested vehicle which if somehting nasty does happen you can stand up in court and say all work was done to a good standard and most importantly then checked by and independent tester and you have the paperwork to prove it.

What it will catch is some of the abortions going round with "tray back" bodies that look like they are about to fall off and are quite likely to be down right dangerous in and accident, badly welded shortened chassis and bodged up steering and braking systems. Since some of these will claim to be "classic" vehicles they won't get caught by and MOT as depending on how old they claim to be they might not need one. I hope know one on here has anything that would match that description but I bet a lot of people have seen them about and on ebay.

I'm not the only one who has taken their vehicle for independent professional inspection and certification after making an alteration (did it for the rebuild and then the subsequent engine swap, axles and brakes upgrade and finally the steering change). It cost a little, but is well worth while. Sadly, those who chose not to bother with such checks and the notification and documentation to insurers and authorities are also often the type who will ignore IVA regs and ring a botched hybrid, thinking they're clever for cheating the system and full of misplaced arrogance over the standard of their work. Sadly, IVAs generally only catch the minor errors of the conscientious and not the horrors of the unscrupulous.

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We're back to 'getting out of it'. Please tell me why you want to go to this hassle to turn an illegal car into, well an illegal car. Just man up and do the test, probably less hassle than what you are describing here.

Daan

Just out of curiosity, yours is an 88 coiler? Are you on a Q plate and what did it take to get it through an IVA?

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This includes receipts for most of the parts and pictures of the entire build.

Now it's these two things that I think are maybe why some people don't bother.

Because if you don't have pics... what are you meant to do? Start again from the beginning?

And if you are building a coiler hybrid, chances are you won't be using new parts. In fact apart from things like gaskets and consumables, you may not use any new parts.

As per my post above, I'd love to know a little more about yours. Thanks.

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Read this:

http://forums.lr4x4/index.php?showtopic=31872&hl=%2Banother+%2Bsuccesfull

It was a commercial SVA in 2008. Although SVA is now called IVA, I have not come across any major differences with regards to the commercial test. For the personal vehicle test however, a few things have changed I believe. The difference between the commercial and personal vehicle test is significant, as the story will show.

Receipts of parts does not mean they need to be new. Also, if you have a v5 from a donor car, that is acceptable. No pictures of a project is not a good idea full stop.

edit: I cant cut and paste a link at my work PC for some reason, can someone have a go? Or search for 'another successful SVA test'.

Daan

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Thanks. So just to clarify Daan, yours is now on a Q plate?

Having detailed photo's still seems like an issue to me. As you simply might not have them or only some, depending on who did the work exactly and when.

Also, when you went for an SVA, what sort of emissions and safety standards apply? Is the same true of the IVA today? As in, surely you don't need to have Cats fitted and does standard Series bodywork and bumpers meet the regs?

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Yes, it is a Q plate. I always build it with the sva in mind, although I did run it on a series 3 registration for a while. You need to show manufacturer data of the engine emissions, which in my case meant a workshop manual for a discovery. I don't think that has changed.

No cats, no EGR, just a basic 300 tdi. the engine was a new, crated 300 repowering unit which has no EGR, which is not quite the same as a discovery. However, the engine number matched to what the disco workshop manual said.

As mentioned in my write up, the commercial sva/iva does not include external projections, and a whole host of other regulations. it takes the manual down from 250 pages to around 10 pages, and a doddle to pass.

This means that a series body can pass, with a winch, snorkel, and junglewires. Also, the 35" simex tyres are no problem, as long as they don't stick out of the bodywork. No changes were made to the car to pass the test, as opposed to what forum specialists, who believe all the kit needs removing. Complete b*****s, and mainly from people who never did the test.

The paperwork is a bit longwinded, but the test was really a glorified MOT. I know people shy away from this, but think about whether you would want to drive a car that does not pass the test. I just stopped reading all the forum chat and read the manual instead. This showed me that it really is a simple thing to do, and it was.

Road tax is £230 per year, insurance is £275 from memory with flux.

Daan

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I put this through the passenger vehicle sva in around 06.

free2.jpeg

free1.jpeg

And I'm currently building this to pass iva in a year or so.

IMAG1476.jpg

Have a read through the iva manual you clearly haven't. You will see it's not that hard to meet the regs with a little thought.

Mike

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Knowing Mike I knew it would be mini based. Not see one of those before though. Looks like a lot of fun!

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It was a lot of fun but it was also my only/every day car at the time. Winter was chilly.

Mike

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I can imagine! Just like driving my 90 to work :lol:

To be fair Ross, the last time you drove your 90 was during the last ice age was it not? :P

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Oh dear, Will Warne the second! :):hysterical::ph34r:

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To be fair Ross, the last time you drove your 90 was during the last ice age was it not? :P

It felt like it.... driving to work in -7C! Wearing my usual shorts and t-shirt. Although I did add a hoodie and two pairs of gloves :P

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Who did what sort of inspection Nick?

Nothing fancy, Ed, just the boss of an MoT approved garage and his tester going over the mods with a fine tooth comb looking for weaknesses, geometry problems and the safe and secure routing of wiring, hoses and such, plus an emissions check (not legally required, but just to give an idea of the engine condition) on that installation and an extended brake efficiency test, with lots of repetition for confirmation and someone watching the brackets and suspension for the torque reaction effects (making sure the axle mounts and such were sound) before writing a report on company headed paper. It cost me about £50 a time, but apart from making sure I was legally covered and the insurers had less wriggle room for any claim, It more importantly verified the work was done to a decent, safe standard. I trust my ideas and my workmanship, but I'm still not going to jeopardise anyone's safety for the sake of £50, and anyone can have a bad day in their garage or driveway.

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