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Anyone brave enough to try?


JeffR
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Land Rover seem to want to look after the "Classic" market, and provide parts for it, but the prices they want to charge seems to show a desire to drive away customers looking for parts for older vehicles. I would have thought that if they were to offer reasonable prices a lots of people would be pleased to buy genuine parts from them. We question the use of Britpart items, but it is not difficult to see why people buy them.

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Could I refer you to a post I've made a number of times regarding UJ's.

The fact that it is made by the same company, does not mean it is the same part!

I bought what was quoted as a 'Genuine' UJ from 5 suppliers including my local main dealer. All were branded GKN. 3 came in Land Rover printed boxes (the one from the main dealer was in a plain white box). 2 had grease nipples - but the design and quality of manufacture of the part from the dealer was significantly better with rollers up to 100% bigger in the cups and was the only one using metal bonded seals.

It may not justify the additional cost - but you cannot assume that something that is claimed to be OEM or Genuine is the same unfortunately. Bitter experience has taught me that the only way to guarantee is to go to your local main dealer.

The others may be fine - but it's a gamble!

Si

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+1. I bought suspension bushes recently. prices ranged from £2 each from britpart, to £20 pounds each from the dealer. I went with the dealer ones, due to experience with cheaper bushes, but it did hurt me to spend it. Whether I suggest to spend 2k on a turbo is debatable, but it is the better solution for sure.

Daan

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What Simon said - OEM's make different grades of gear for different applications. A genuine LR part is likely to be specced for 100,000 miles, be better sealed against crud, etc. etc.

Now, in this case I'd probably trust Garrett to make a decent enough turbo to be worth the risk Vs the ~£2000 saving, not sure I'd risk saving the extra £50-100 on the random cheapies.

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They will be identical. I've yet to see an OEM and Genuine LR part that are different. Certainly in this case they will be the same.

How often do people get to see - and closely inspect two side by side? Almost never.

I was looking for a UJ for a product and needed the best quality at the lowest price - so it was worthwhile. I ended up using a New Holland Tractor part, identical to the LR part and cheaper than the main dealer.

It was just luck that with a UJ it's relatively easy to inspect the differences. A turbo is harder without complete disassembly and measurement kit that I can't afford!

Si

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Land Rover seem to want to look after the "Classic" market, and provide parts for it, but the prices they want to charge seems to show a desire to drive away customers looking for parts for older vehicles. I would have thought that if they were to offer reasonable prices a lots of people would be pleased to buy genuine parts from them. We question the use of Britpart items, but it is not difficult to see why people buy them.

They did try once with the "heritage" market. What was the programme called? It sounded quite promising. Apparently they still had a lot of the old tooling, or knew of businesses that did, so they were going to make parts for old Landies to keep that market supplied with Genuine parts. I seem to remember that after only a couple of years, some new boss came in and cancelled the whole thing. Rovers North in the US reckon they got most of the parts that were being dumped.

It would probably have been a great business if it had been allowed to grow properly. A lot of people would be buying Genuine anything if it was available at a decent price. I bought two viscous fan clutches a few years ago. One aftermarket, one Genuine. They were identical, of course, except the Genuine one was two or more times the price. I've got a Ford Falcon part on the engine instead now!

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I think that Heritage scheme is the new one announced within the last 12, possibly just six months, following the success of the Jaguar Heritage scheme. It did seem a major change of heart for Tata, who announced shortly after their take over of JLR that they would only support vehicles up to ten years old, in other words, only complying with EU law and determined to force owners of older vehicles to scrap them and buy new. It is the auctions of SIs and early RRCs which will have changed their minds; they see the prices they go for and realised they can make good money supporting that market. Perhaps the end of Defender production was also a factor, given how easy they are to rebuild - I suspect the SI factory rebuild scheme may be testing the waters and practicality of having a department rebuild other "classic" vehicles that the enthusiasts want, the rebuild nature circumventing many vehicle standards and emissions regulations, making an easy revenue stream for JLR.

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The S1 factory rebuild scheme has been quoted as saying they will be doing 20 something S1's with an expected price between 60k and 80k. I'll try and find the link as my memory is bad

EDIT:

http://www.autoblog.com/2016/04/06/land-rover-series-1-reborn-restoration/

Just a few months after the last new Defender rolled off the production line in Solihull, England, the familiar boxy shape is back as Land Rover's Classic division has declared 25 examples will be restored into as-new condition and sold to customers under the new Reborn program.

The 25 vehicles have been cherry-picked from amongst restoration candidates to ensure they are as authentic as possible, and they will be stripped down to bare metal for a nut-and-bolt rebuild at a special workshop at the Solihull plant. The lucky buyers get to choose from five period-correct colors and two wheelbases, and there is a chance to follow the restoration work being performed on each vintage 4x4.

Land Rover has already sold an unrestored and scruffy example that had been displayed at the Techno Classica show in Essen, Germany. Prices for completed cars are said to range from £60,000 to £80,000 ($85,000-$110,000) so a factory-backed and warrantied "Reborn" Land Rover will not come cheap but it will be perfect. The thorough work has been estimated to take from six to nine months. After the initial 25-car batch has been completed, the restoration service will be made available for customer vehicles in sore need of sprucing up.

Land Rover's Reborn program announcement comes hot in the heels of Jaguar's XKSS Continuation series. Jaguar will assemble nine XKSS sports cars, which remained unproduced after a fire broke out at the Browns Lane factory in February 1957.

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That's a new one! The programme I remember was at least ten years ago or more. I've still got the CD-ROM from it. Someone was stupidly short-sighted at the time when they scrapped it.

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With genuine prices LR probably factors in some quality control cost + their obvious brand markup for peace of mind.

Here's my experience when I was comparing OEM, Britpart and Genuine with a crank seal http://forums.lr4x4.com/index.php?showtopic=88004

The genuine part had a fault and they sent a new one no questions and told me to bin it, so I tend to believe you're also buying a form of insurance if it's not good quality. With Britpart it would probably have taken ages to get a new replacement.

How often do people get to see - and closely inspect two side by side? Almost never.

I do agree with Simon on this. The typical private owner isn't going to buy two/three of something expensive just to compare, even though buying online you have 14 days cooling off. Therefore they get away with it. I've done some comparisons for curiosity (as above) but mostly with < £15 parts.

A comparison of some universal joints: http://www.landroverexpedition.com/articles/universal-joint-differences/

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With genuine prices LR probably factors in some quality control cost + their obvious brand markup for peace of mind.

Here's my experience when I was comparing OEM, Britpart and Genuine with a crank seal http://forums.lr4x4.com/index.php?showtopic=88004

The genuine part had a fault and they sent a new one no questions and told me to bin it, so I tend to believe you're also buying a form of insurance if it's not good quality. With Britpart it would probably have taken ages to get a new replacement.

Only a problem for customers who don't know the law - the Sales of Goods act means that your contract is with the vendor, and they have to give you a replacement immediately. Dealing with wholesalers and manufacturers is the vendor's problem, not the customer's.

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