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S3 Heater control valve - whatspacer for a 200TDi?


Journey Man
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Hi,

I'm trying to replace the heater control valve on my S3. It has a 200TDi conversion, and there is a threaded hexagonal spacer between the engine and the valve. Unfortunately this is not coming off the old valve despite significant persuasion. Does anyone know whether this spacer is a LR part? I'm assuming it's a fix to mate the S3 valve to the TDi, as I can't find it in the manuals I've found online.

Here is the old valve with the spacer:

post-33336-0-11250200-1472803238_thumb.jpeg

This is where it goes into the engine:

post-33336-0-76244500-1472803258_thumb.jpeg

If anyone knows where I can order a suitable alternate, that would be fantastic. It's 40mm, but 45mm or even 50mm would be better. He control valve has a 15mm threaded section, and the spacer has a 10mm threaded male section. I'm not sure of the male and female diameters but I'd hazard a guess at them being M16.

Thanks

Dan

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594622 is the S3 part number, but I can only assume the same part fits a 200TDi, as I have no hands-on experience with those engines. I would expect, coming from a S3, that the threads are BSP.

Other suppliers, or perhaps eBay vendors, are available.

Before even thinking of buying one, especially as the valve is scrap, I would be using heat to break the corrosion hold.

I found it listed in an Optional extras Parts Catalogue, shown for the S3, 2.25 engines.

Regards.

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The cooling system is designed to have the water flowing through the pipe outlet to the heater. Only because a tap fits and you've not had issues does not mean its correct for the engine design

That was my thought when the situation was brought up.

I went looking for a Workshop Manual cooling section that covered the 200TDi, as they often include a text description, plus a line drawing, showing the coolant flow.

I failed to find that detail.

I found a 200TDi supplement in a Defender manual, but it had no coolant flow details.

However, I did find details of the 300TDi in both the Classic Range Rover and the Discovery Series 1.

I had to note that in both instances the engine has a bypass housing, and the flow description with a closed thermostat uses that bypass, with no mention of flow through the heater.

I will qualify that again, I have no hands on experience with either engine, I just read the books.

The other point that needs to be recognised is that in non-standard installations we have to make some allowance that the official manuals might not accurately reflect every detail, so it MIGHT be possible that the cooling can be set up to use the heater as the bypass circuit, in which case having a tap capable of closing of the flow would not be a good idea.

Regards.

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The cooling system is designed to have the water flowing through the pipe outlet to the heater. Only because a tap fits and you've not had issues does not mean its correct for the engine design

It is fine without that flow. Provide some evidence to support your claim. I understand is fine detail how the coolant system and flow paths are arranged. There is no valid reason for there to be a flow from that port. The coolant flows up from the block just below the heater port and will flow through the head to the pump inlet as easily as if that coolant went to the heater.

This is just another old wife's tale with nothing behind it.

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Water won't be circulating around no 4 cylinder correctly as intended and won't be cooling as efficiently. It can quite easily create hot spot around no 4. I also understand cooling systems

There won't be any evidence as engine was never designed with that port blanked off.

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I do not agree. The water flow around the cylinder won't be changed at all. It only makes a slight change to the water flow inside the head around the #4 exhaust port. Flow inside the block is unchanged.

Sure, I have evidence. I've been running a decade with a valve, that is closed all summer and driven very hard over mountains towing a trailer. The head was just off last year and everything is still like new.

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The Defender heater, introduced on the 110 with the 10J engine before the 12J and later 19J and Tdis came along, has a diverter flap so that the incoming air is directed through or around the heater matrix. I always believed that to be for two reasons: a) the airflow has less resistance with cold selected, so a far greater airflow is available for cab cooling in warm conditions, and, b) the water control valve on the SIII engines was a known failure point, often seizing with rust and scale, and even when selected open created a flow restriction which reduced heater matrix performance below what it could be with the valve removed. The valve was removed from 110 2.25 petrol and diesel engines of near identical spec to SIIIs, and the 2.5 versions of those engines well before they started dealing with major revamps and redesigns. I honestly don't think fitting the valve to the Tdi will do any harm.

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